Psychology Professor Offers Insights on Teenage Drug Use | Teachers College Columbia University

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Psychology Professor Offers Insights on Teenage Drug Use

Suniya Luthar, a professor of elemental and clinical psychology at Columbia University's Teachers College, spoke at a forum May 13 sponsored by the Greenwich Coalition to Prevent Underage Drinking and Liberation Programs, a community group dedicated to preventing substance abuse.
Suniya Luthar, a professor of elemental and clinical psychology at Columbia University's Teachers College, spoke at a forum May 13 sponsored by the Greenwich Coalition to Prevent Underage Drinking and Liberation Programs, a community group dedicated to preventing substance abuse.

Dr. Luthar entitled her presentation "Privileged But Pressured? Affluence and the Teenage Reality" and admitted while she didn't have all the answers, researchers like herself had some insights.

She said drinking and drug problems are worse in suburban, wealthy communities than in inner cities, where kids live in abject poverty and violence is a daily reality. She said the problems are particularly bad for teenage girls in suburban environments.

This article, written by Ken Borsuk, appeared in the May 18th, 2006 publication of The Greenwich Post.

Published Friday, May. 19, 2006

Psychology Professor Offers Insights on Teenage Drug Use

Suniya Luthar, a professor of elemental and clinical psychology at Columbia University's Teachers College, spoke at a forum May 13 sponsored by the Greenwich Coalition to Prevent Underage Drinking and Liberation Programs, a community group dedicated to preventing substance abuse.

Dr. Luthar entitled her presentation "Privileged But Pressured? Affluence and the Teenage Reality" and admitted while she didn't have all the answers, researchers like herself had some insights.

She said drinking and drug problems are worse in suburban, wealthy communities than in inner cities, where kids live in abject poverty and violence is a daily reality. She said the problems are particularly bad for teenage girls in suburban environments.

This article, written by Ken Borsuk, appeared in the May 18th, 2006 publication of The Greenwich Post.

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