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The 100% Solution

In its manifesto arguing for what is called weighted-student funding, which its leaders dub the "100 percent solution," the group, comprised of former top education officials and superintendents say the method differs from prevailing budget practices that often shift resources away from the schools that need them most.

In its manifesto arguing for what is called weighted-student funding, which its leaders dub the "100 percent solution," the group, comprised of former top education officials and superintendents say the method differs from prevailing budget practices that often shift resources away from the schools that need them most.

A New York City lawyer fighting to increase state spending on schools agreed that while the weighted-student funding formula does address schools' need to be adequately funded, it fails to explain exactly how it would improve student achievement.

"What we're concerned about is that people are going to talk about this as the panacea," said Michael A. Rebell, the director of the Campaign for Educational Equity at Teachers College, Columbia University. "It's a step backward because it's so convinced of what the answers are."

This article appeared in the July 13th, 2006 publication of Education Week.

Published Sunday, Jul. 16, 2006

The 100% Solution

In its manifesto arguing for what is called weighted-student funding, which its leaders dub the "100 percent solution," the group, comprised of former top education officials and superintendents say the method differs from prevailing budget practices that often shift resources away from the schools that need them most.

A New York City lawyer fighting to increase state spending on schools agreed that while the weighted-student funding formula does address schools' need to be adequately funded, it fails to explain exactly how it would improve student achievement.

"What we're concerned about is that people are going to talk about this as the panacea," said Michael A. Rebell, the director of the Campaign for Educational Equity at Teachers College, Columbia University. "It's a step backward because it's so convinced of what the answers are."

This article appeared in the July 13th, 2006 publication of Education Week.

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