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States Not Meeting National Math Standards

Getting all elementary and high school students proficient in math and reading simply isn't possible yet. That's the conclusion of a series of reports being presented this week at Columbia University's Teachers College. The federal No Child Left Behind Law requires all students to be proficient by 2014 or states risk losing federal dollars. But a slew of researchers have found some states are setting the bar too low, raising doubts about test results.

Getting all elementary and high school students proficient in math and reading simply isn't possible yet. That's the conclusion of a series of reports being presented this week at Columbia University's Teachers College.  The federal No Child Left Behind Law requires all students to be proficient by 2014 or states risk losing federal dollars. But a slew of researchers have found some states are setting the bar too low, raising doubts about test results. 

Michael Rebell, executive director of the new Campaign for Educational Equity at Teachers College, applauds the goals of the No Child Left Behind Law, but says it's time to set realistic goals that can help kids learn.

This article appeared in the November 14, 2006 edition of the New York Public Radio.

http://www.wnyc.org/news/articles/68999

Published Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2006

States Not Meeting National Math Standards

Getting all elementary and high school students proficient in math and reading simply isn't possible yet. That's the conclusion of a series of reports being presented this week at Columbia University's Teachers College.  The federal No Child Left Behind Law requires all students to be proficient by 2014 or states risk losing federal dollars. But a slew of researchers have found some states are setting the bar too low, raising doubts about test results. 

Michael Rebell, executive director of the new Campaign for Educational Equity at Teachers College, applauds the goals of the No Child Left Behind Law, but says it's time to set realistic goals that can help kids learn.

This article appeared in the November 14, 2006 edition of the New York Public Radio.

http://www.wnyc.org/news/articles/68999

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