Students no longer to be overwhelmed by new GRE | Teachers College Columbia University

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
Teachers College Newsroom

Teachers College Newsroom

Skip to content Skip to content

Students no longer to be overwhelmed by new GRE

College students nationwide heaved a collective sigh at the news that plans for the new Graduate Record Examination (GRE) has been officially scrapped. The sudden change is surprising to many, because in February the Educational Testing Service (ETS) promised that the new version would be up and running in September.
College students nationwide heaved a collective sigh at the news that plans for the new Graduate Record Examination (GRE) has been officially scrapped. The sudden change is surprising to many, because in February the Educational Testing Service (ETS) promised that the new version would be up and running in September.
 
"Many graduate admission professionals were looking at alternate means of evaluation to be sure that all applicants were applying to our institutions with a level playing field," said Thomas P. Rock, director of admission at Teachers College of Columbia University. "By limiting access to the GRE examination, a segment of our population was cut off from this standard for admission at many institutions. Had ETS gone ahead with this launch, I think we would have seen more schools opting out of the GRE as a measure of evaluation."
 
This article appeared in the April 20, 2007 edition of the Observer Online.
 

http://observer.case.edu/Archives/Volume_39/Issue_25/Story_1712/ 

 

Published Monday, Apr. 30, 2007

Students no longer to be overwhelmed by new GRE

College students nationwide heaved a collective sigh at the news that plans for the new Graduate Record Examination (GRE) has been officially scrapped. The sudden change is surprising to many, because in February the Educational Testing Service (ETS) promised that the new version would be up and running in September.
 
"Many graduate admission professionals were looking at alternate means of evaluation to be sure that all applicants were applying to our institutions with a level playing field," said Thomas P. Rock, director of admission at Teachers College of Columbia University. "By limiting access to the GRE examination, a segment of our population was cut off from this standard for admission at many institutions. Had ETS gone ahead with this launch, I think we would have seen more schools opting out of the GRE as a measure of evaluation."
 
This article appeared in the April 20, 2007 edition of the Observer Online.
 

http://observer.case.edu/Archives/Volume_39/Issue_25/Story_1712/ 

 

How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends