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Software for kindergarten Beethovens

Child prodigies are rare in any artistic pursuit, but new music composition software is making it easier for parents and teachers to raise a little Beethoven.

Sibelius, a well-known maker of software that's used by musicians as well as composers on Hollywood films like Casino Royale, last week released the latest in a line of music software designed for children ages five to 11.

"Most salient is that you're connecting the home lives of students, many of whom are comfortable in the computer environment, by using a vehicle like technology to teach any subject with great graphics, sounds and user friendliness," said James Frankel, a professor of music at Columbia University's Teachers College.

"It involves some critical thinking because it includes notation. Students can see what that music looks like, unlike the shapes that walk by in the graphical interface. It's the perfect software to bridge the gap between a fun game-like experience into a more traditional notation and music education," Frankel said. "It will hopefully inspire them to compose in the traditional way."

This article appeared in the May 12, 2007 edition of the Cnet News.com.

http://news.com.com/Software+for+kindergarten+Beethovens/2009-1027_3-6183340.html

Published Thursday, May. 17, 2007

Software for kindergarten Beethovens

Sibelius, a well-known maker of software that's used by musicians as well as composers on Hollywood films like Casino Royale, last week released the latest in a line of music software designed for children ages five to 11.

"Most salient is that you're connecting the home lives of students, many of whom are comfortable in the computer environment, by using a vehicle like technology to teach any subject with great graphics, sounds and user friendliness," said James Frankel, a professor of music at Columbia University's Teachers College.

"It involves some critical thinking because it includes notation. Students can see what that music looks like, unlike the shapes that walk by in the graphical interface. It's the perfect software to bridge the gap between a fun game-like experience into a more traditional notation and music education," Frankel said. "It will hopefully inspire them to compose in the traditional way."

This article appeared in the May 12, 2007 edition of the Cnet News.com.

http://news.com.com/Software+for+kindergarten+Beethovens/2009-1027_3-6183340.html

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