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Education Researchers and Policy Makers Still Not in Sync, Scholars Say

Education researchers have begun to do more work that is relevant to policy makers, and policy makers have begun to pay more intelligent attention to education research.

Education researchers have begun to do more work that is relevant to policy makers, and policy makers have begun to pay more intelligent attention to education research -- but there is still a long way to go on both fronts, scholars said on Monday during a conference here at the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank.

The field of education research should develop a prestigious, high-quality flagship journal, argued several speakers. Mr. Goldhaber said that a flagship journal would make it easier for policy makers and the news media to quickly assess the quality of controversial education studies. Jeffrey Henig, a professor of political science at Columbia University and a professor of education at its Teachers College, agreed that such a journal is needed, but worried that no association or university was in a position to make it happen. "Who has the incentive to create such a thing?" he asked.

This article appeared in the May 22, 2007 edition of the Chronicle.

http://chronicle.com/daily/2007/05/2007052203n.htm

Published Thursday, May. 24, 2007

Education Researchers and Policy Makers Still Not in Sync, Scholars Say

Education researchers have begun to do more work that is relevant to policy makers, and policy makers have begun to pay more intelligent attention to education research -- but there is still a long way to go on both fronts, scholars said on Monday during a conference here at the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank.

The field of education research should develop a prestigious, high-quality flagship journal, argued several speakers. Mr. Goldhaber said that a flagship journal would make it easier for policy makers and the news media to quickly assess the quality of controversial education studies. Jeffrey Henig, a professor of political science at Columbia University and a professor of education at its Teachers College, agreed that such a journal is needed, but worried that no association or university was in a position to make it happen. "Who has the incentive to create such a thing?" he asked.

This article appeared in the May 22, 2007 edition of the Chronicle.

http://chronicle.com/daily/2007/05/2007052203n.htm

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