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Storyteller delights crowd at African festival

Wayne Charles recalled that when he was a child in White Plains, there were not many activities or events that acknowledged African heritage and culture.

SPRING VALLEY - Wayne Charles recalled that when he was a child in White Plains, there were not many activities or events that acknowledged African heritage and culture.

"If you are a minority, a less privileged group in a society, it's easy for you to conclude that you are inferior, that you are less important because the dominant culture doesn't cover your history," said Edmund Gordon, a professor at the Teachers College at Columbia University. "Since the schools have not done as much as they could, it's important for us to do that."

The festival not only showcased the traditions of the African culture, but the talent of the community, said Gordon, who is one of the founders of the CEJJES Institute.

"I'm always delighted to see how much talent and enthusiasm young people have," he said. "And to see it directed towards positive events."

This article appeared in the July 15, 2007 edition of the Journal News.

http://www.nynews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070715/NEWS03/707150379 

Published Wednesday, Jul. 18, 2007

Storyteller delights crowd at African festival

SPRING VALLEY - Wayne Charles recalled that when he was a child in White Plains, there were not many activities or events that acknowledged African heritage and culture.

"If you are a minority, a less privileged group in a society, it's easy for you to conclude that you are inferior, that you are less important because the dominant culture doesn't cover your history," said Edmund Gordon, a professor at the Teachers College at Columbia University. "Since the schools have not done as much as they could, it's important for us to do that."

The festival not only showcased the traditions of the African culture, but the talent of the community, said Gordon, who is one of the founders of the CEJJES Institute.

"I'm always delighted to see how much talent and enthusiasm young people have," he said. "And to see it directed towards positive events."

This article appeared in the July 15, 2007 edition of the Journal News.

http://www.nynews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070715/NEWS03/707150379 

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