NYC's Gifted and Talented Programs Still Inequitable | Teachers College Columbia University

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NYC's Gifted and Talented Programs Still Inequitable

In an op-ed piece in the New York Daily News on February 14, Professor James Borland, who is also coordinator of programs in gifted education at TC, writes that, despite New York City's revamp of its gifted and talented program, it's a safe bet that wealthier kids - mostly white and Asian - will again dominate in this year's contest for entry, with poorer children of color increasingly excluded.
In an op-ed piece in the New York Daily News on February 14, Professor James Borland, who is also coordinator of programs in gifted education at TC, writes that, despite New York City's revamp of its gifted and talented program, it's a safe bet that wealthier kids - mostly white and Asian - will again dominate in this year's contest for entry, with poorer children of color increasingly excluded.

"Last week marked the close of registration for admissions testing for next year's public Gifted and Talented (G&T) programs in New York City schools. While parents won't learn for months how their children performed, it's a safe bet that wealthier kids - mostly white and Asian - will again be the big winners, with poorer children of color increasingly excluded."

The article "Gifted kids deserve better: Time to fix the city's failed G&T plan" was published on February 14th, 2009 in the "New York Times" http://www.nydailynews.com/opinions/2009/02/16/2009-02-16_gifted_kids_deserve_better_time_to_fix_t.html

Published Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2009

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NYC's Gifted and Talented Programs Still Inequitable

In an op-ed piece in the New York Daily News on February 14, Professor James Borland, who is also coordinator of programs in gifted education at TC, writes that, despite New York City's revamp of its gifted and talented program, it's a safe bet that wealthier kids - mostly white and Asian - will again dominate in this year's contest for entry, with poorer children of color increasingly excluded.

"Last week marked the close of registration for admissions testing for next year's public Gifted and Talented (G&T) programs in New York City schools. While parents won't learn for months how their children performed, it's a safe bet that wealthier kids - mostly white and Asian - will again be the big winners, with poorer children of color increasingly excluded."

The article "Gifted kids deserve better: Time to fix the city's failed G&T plan" was published on February 14th, 2009 in the "New York Times" http://www.nydailynews.com/opinions/2009/02/16/2009-02-16_gifted_kids_deserve_better_time_to_fix_t.html
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