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Rethinking Intractable Conflict

Intractable conflicts are those that are highly destructive and endure by perpetuating the very conditions of misery and hate that contributed to them in the first place. Certainly the most visible causes of such conflicts -- competition for scarce resources; ideological differences -- are important. But in a paper in American Psychologist, TC's Peter Coleman and colleagues argue for a paradigm shift in addressing such problems -- a dynamical systems approach that stresses the role of more basic dynamics and considers three strategies for changing systems of thoughts, beliefs and memories in enduring conflicts. Click here to visit the publication's Website and access the current issue and article text: http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/amp/
Intractable Conflict

Intractable conflicts are those that are highly destructive and endure by perpetuating the very conditions of misery and hate that contributed to them in the first place. Certainly the most visible causes of such conflicts – competition for scarce resources; ideological differences – are important. But in a paper in American Psychologist, TC’s Peter Coleman and colleagues argue for a paradigm shift in addressing such problems – a dynamical systems approach that stresses the role of more basic dynamics and considers three strategies for changing systems of thoughts, beliefs and memories in enduring conflicts. Click here to visit the publication’s Website and access the current issue and article text: http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/amp/

Coleman also guest-edited a recent issue of Peace and Conflict: The Journal of Peace Psychology (http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~db=all~content=g921838226)
and published an article in Harvard’s Negotiation Journal on the same topic.

Published Thursday, Jun. 10, 2010

Rethinking Intractable Conflict

Intractable Conflict

Intractable conflicts are those that are highly destructive and endure by perpetuating the very conditions of misery and hate that contributed to them in the first place. Certainly the most visible causes of such conflicts – competition for scarce resources; ideological differences – are important. But in a paper in American Psychologist, TC’s Peter Coleman and colleagues argue for a paradigm shift in addressing such problems – a dynamical systems approach that stresses the role of more basic dynamics and considers three strategies for changing systems of thoughts, beliefs and memories in enduring conflicts. Click here to visit the publication’s Website and access the current issue and article text: http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/amp/

Coleman also guest-edited a recent issue of Peace and Conflict: The Journal of Peace Psychology (http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~db=all~content=g921838226)
and published an article in Harvard’s Negotiation Journal on the same topic.
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