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Teachers College EdLab and Dr. Peter Coleman Collaborate on Intractable Conflict Videos

With the help of Ed Lab at Teachers College, Peter Coleman has created four short videos about intractable conflicts. These videos are creative, engaging and explain complex theories through real-life situations. Click here to watch the videos: http://icccr.pressible.org/videos
Some problems never go away. Experts estimate that about 5% of our more difficult conflicts become intractable – highly destructive, never-ending and virtually impossible to solve. They happen in families, with old friends, at work, between neighbors, and in the broader community and geopolitical arenas. These types of conflicts are not just harmful and exhausting, but they tend to spread and get worse over time and rarely just go away. And despite all the progress that’s been made in understanding and negotiating most types of conflict, there has been little offered to help with these more unworkable ones. However, a new perspective and current research coming out of complexity science and psychology has opened up a novel set of ideas and tools for addressing these problems.  Check out these videos to learn more about the 5% Problem:http://icccr.pressible.org/videos

Published Monday, Oct. 11, 2010

Teachers College EdLab and Dr. Peter Coleman Collaborate on Intractable Conflict Videos

Some problems never go away. Experts estimate that about 5% of our more difficult conflicts become intractable – highly destructive, never-ending and virtually impossible to solve. They happen in families, with old friends, at work, between neighbors, and in the broader community and geopolitical arenas. These types of conflicts are not just harmful and exhausting, but they tend to spread and get worse over time and rarely just go away. And despite all the progress that’s been made in understanding and negotiating most types of conflict, there has been little offered to help with these more unworkable ones. However, a new perspective and current research coming out of complexity science and psychology has opened up a novel set of ideas and tools for addressing these problems.  Check out these videos to learn more about the 5% Problem:http://icccr.pressible.org/videos
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