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Educational Equity for Undocumented Students: Legislators to Discuss Dream Act for New York State on April 10 at TC

Senator Bill Perkins and State Representative Guillermo Linares will speak in Milbank Chapel April 10, followed by faculty panel discussion.
MEDIA ADVISORY

New York State “Dream Act”: Educational Equity for Undocumented New Yorkers

New York Sen. Bill Perkins and Assemblyman Guillermo Linares will discuss a state “Dream Act” at Teachers College, Columbia University April 10

WHO:    New York State Senator Bill Perkins, Assemblyman Guillermo Linares, and a panel of Teachers College experts, including Regina Cortina, Associate Professor of Education;  Kevin Dougherty, Associate Professor of Higher Education; Ernest Morrell, Professor of English Education; and Kenny Nienhusser, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Higher Education

WHAT:    Panel to discuss the introduction and possible implications of the New York State Dream Act, which aims to increase access to higher education for undocumented students.

WHEN:    Tuesday, April 10, 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

WHERE:    Milbank Chapel, Teachers College, Columbia University, 120th and Broadway, New York City

BACKGROUND:  Since 2001, Congress has considered and failed to pass various forms of the federal Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors, or “Dream Act.” The bill currently under discussion in Washington would allow undocumented immigrants to apply for permanent residency if they complete two years of a four-year college degree program or two years of U.S. military service. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla) is reportedly preparing another version.

Not wishing to wait for Washington to act, some states, including New York, have passed their own legislation qualifying undocumented students for lower, in-state tuition rates. But only three – Texas, New Mexico and California – allow them to receive government tuition aid. In New York State, Perkins and Linares have introduced a bill that would allow undocumented students to apply for the state’s Tuition Assistance Program or for assistance with private funds.

The two legislators will discuss why they think New York should help undocumented residents – many of whom were born here or brought as young children – get an affordable education, and panelists will respond.
 
This event is sponsored by the Latina/o and Latin American Faculty Working Group and the Institute for Urban and Minority Education at Teachers College, Columbia University.



Published Monday, Apr. 9, 2012

Educational Equity for Undocumented Students: Legislators to Discuss Dream Act for New York State on April 10 at TC

MEDIA ADVISORY

New York State “Dream Act”: Educational Equity for Undocumented New Yorkers

New York Sen. Bill Perkins and Assemblyman Guillermo Linares will discuss a state “Dream Act” at Teachers College, Columbia University April 10

WHO:    New York State Senator Bill Perkins, Assemblyman Guillermo Linares, and a panel of Teachers College experts, including Regina Cortina, Associate Professor of Education;  Kevin Dougherty, Associate Professor of Higher Education; Ernest Morrell, Professor of English Education; and Kenny Nienhusser, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Higher Education

WHAT:    Panel to discuss the introduction and possible implications of the New York State Dream Act, which aims to increase access to higher education for undocumented students.

WHEN:    Tuesday, April 10, 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

WHERE:    Milbank Chapel, Teachers College, Columbia University, 120th and Broadway, New York City

BACKGROUND:  Since 2001, Congress has considered and failed to pass various forms of the federal Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors, or “Dream Act.” The bill currently under discussion in Washington would allow undocumented immigrants to apply for permanent residency if they complete two years of a four-year college degree program or two years of U.S. military service. Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla) is reportedly preparing another version.

Not wishing to wait for Washington to act, some states, including New York, have passed their own legislation qualifying undocumented students for lower, in-state tuition rates. But only three – Texas, New Mexico and California – allow them to receive government tuition aid. In New York State, Perkins and Linares have introduced a bill that would allow undocumented students to apply for the state’s Tuition Assistance Program or for assistance with private funds.

The two legislators will discuss why they think New York should help undocumented residents – many of whom were born here or brought as young children – get an affordable education, and panelists will respond.
 
This event is sponsored by the Latina/o and Latin American Faculty Working Group and the Institute for Urban and Minority Education at Teachers College, Columbia University.



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