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NYT's David Brooks Features Lisa Miller Book, The Spiritual Child

A new book by TC’s Lisa Miller is featured in an op-ed by columnist David Brooks in the May 22 edition of The New York Times. Miller is Professor of Psychology and Education and Director of Clinical Psychology in the Department of Counseling and Clinical Psychology, and Director of TC’s Spirituality Mind Body Institute

In an op-ed about the importance of nurturing spiritual development in children, Brooks writes that Miller’s book, The Spiritual Child: The New Science on Parenting for Health and Lifelong Thriving, argues that “spiritual awareness is innate and that it is an important component in human development. An implication of her work is that if you care about social mobility, graduation rates, resilience, achievement and family formation, you can’t ignore the spiritual resources of the people you are trying to help.”

For more than two decades, Miller has led scientific research in the field of spiritual awareness in children, adolescents and mothers as well as spirituality in mental health. She published an excerpt from her book in the Huffington Post, One Of The Most Important Things Kids Need Is Something They Are Actually Born With, about how to parent in a way that encourages and nurtures children’s innate spirituality.

Here is a story about Lisa Miller, Blazing a Spiritual Path, in Brainstorm, a series on the TC website about the work of faculty members.

The New York Times: Building Spiritual Capital

Miller discusses her research on spirituality and the brain on the Today Show.

New York Magazine featured Miller’s work in “The Science of Us” column: Why Kids Need Spirituality.

 

The views expressed in the previous article are solely those of the speakers to whom they are attributed. They do not necessarily reflect the views of the faculty, administration, or staff either of Teachers College or of Columbia University.

Published Tuesday, May. 26, 2015

NYT's David Brooks Features Lisa Miller Book, The Spiritual Child

A new book by TC’s Lisa Miller is featured in an op-ed by columnist David Brooks in the May 22 edition of The New York Times. Miller is Professor of Psychology and Education and Director of Clinical Psychology in the Department of Counseling and Clinical Psychology, and Director of TC’s Spirituality Mind Body Institute

In an op-ed about the importance of nurturing spiritual development in children, Brooks writes that Miller’s book, The Spiritual Child: The New Science on Parenting for Health and Lifelong Thriving, argues that “spiritual awareness is innate and that it is an important component in human development. An implication of her work is that if you care about social mobility, graduation rates, resilience, achievement and family formation, you can’t ignore the spiritual resources of the people you are trying to help.”

For more than two decades, Miller has led scientific research in the field of spiritual awareness in children, adolescents and mothers as well as spirituality in mental health. She published an excerpt from her book in the Huffington Post, One Of The Most Important Things Kids Need Is Something They Are Actually Born With, about how to parent in a way that encourages and nurtures children’s innate spirituality.

Here is a story about Lisa Miller, Blazing a Spiritual Path, in Brainstorm, a series on the TC website about the work of faculty members.

The New York Times: Building Spiritual Capital

Miller discusses her research on spirituality and the brain on the Today Show.

New York Magazine featured Miller’s work in “The Science of Us” column: Why Kids Need Spirituality.

 

The views expressed in the previous article are solely those of the speakers to whom they are attributed. They do not necessarily reflect the views of the faculty, administration, or staff either of Teachers College or of Columbia University.

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