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Pam Koch in the NYTimes: As Americans change their eating habits, Big Food is struggling to keep up

In the November 6, 2015, New York Times Sunday Review, Pamela Koch, Executive Director of TC’s Laurie M. Tisch Center for Food, Education & Policy, writes that big food manufacturers will need to make some big changes in order to meet the demands of today’s consumers. Read the op-ed here.

As a growing number of consumers walk away from America’s most iconic food brands, big food manufacturers are cleaning up their ingredient labels, acquiring healthier brands and coming out with a prodigious array of new products. But if Big Food is to survive changes in eating habits, warns Koch and co-author Hans Taparia, an assistant professor at the New York University Stern School of Business, it must ultimately look to the perimeter of stores, where shoppers are increasingly turning for raw produce, meats, bakery items and fresh prepared foods. It's an effort that may well require companies to overhaul their supply chains and organizational structures, not to mention make billion-dollar investments—but those who don't may soon find that the cupboard is bare.

Link: A Seismic Shift in How People Eat

The views expressed in the previous article are solely those of the speakers to whom they are attributed. They do not necessarily reflect the views of the faculty, administration, or staff either of Teachers College or of Columbia University.

Published Saturday, Nov. 7, 2015

Pam Koch in the NYTimes: As Americans change their eating habits, Big Food is struggling to keep up

In the November 6, 2015, New York Times Sunday Review, Pamela Koch, Executive Director of TC’s Laurie M. Tisch Center for Food, Education & Policy, writes that big food manufacturers will need to make some big changes in order to meet the demands of today’s consumers. Read the op-ed here.

As a growing number of consumers walk away from America’s most iconic food brands, big food manufacturers are cleaning up their ingredient labels, acquiring healthier brands and coming out with a prodigious array of new products. But if Big Food is to survive changes in eating habits, warns Koch and co-author Hans Taparia, an assistant professor at the New York University Stern School of Business, it must ultimately look to the perimeter of stores, where shoppers are increasingly turning for raw produce, meats, bakery items and fresh prepared foods. It's an effort that may well require companies to overhaul their supply chains and organizational structures, not to mention make billion-dollar investments—but those who don't may soon find that the cupboard is bare.

Link: A Seismic Shift in How People Eat

The views expressed in the previous article are solely those of the speakers to whom they are attributed. They do not necessarily reflect the views of the faculty, administration, or staff either of Teachers College or of Columbia University.

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