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Laurie M. Tisch Center for Food, Education & Policy

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School Gardens are More Than Just a Trendy Fad

According to a recent study by Tisch Food Center researcher, Kate Gardener Burt, school gardens have a 150 year history stemming from the coining of the term kindergarten, German for “children’s garden.” 

In mid 1800s Europe, the connection between young children’s budding intelligence and their work in gardens blossomed. Not long after, the movement spread to New York City and school gardens began to work in tandem with timely educational objectives. Throughout the years, support for school gardening has ebbed and flowed in direct correlation to historical events. Depression, wartime, and modern technology all influenced society’s view of school gardens. Currently, as sustainable living has become a hot topic, school gardens have resurfaced as a way to address health, environmental, and social justice issues. 

The Tisch Food Center recently released the GREEN (Garden Resources, Education, and Environment Nexus) Tool - a practical, flexible, evidence-based tool designed to help gardens grow deep roots in schools. The GREEN Tool enables advocates, educators, and policymakers identify strategies and resources to sustain school gardens over the long term.

Explore The GREEN Tool Research Brief, featuring the visual GREEN Tool Map illustrating pathways to establish, integrate, and sustain school gardens, school garden case studies, and policy recommendations.

Published Monday, Nov. 21, 2016

School Gardens are More Than Just a Trendy Fad

In mid 1800s Europe, the connection between young children’s budding intelligence and their work in gardens blossomed. Not long after, the movement spread to New York City and school gardens began to work in tandem with timely educational objectives. Throughout the years, support for school gardening has ebbed and flowed in direct correlation to historical events. Depression, wartime, and modern technology all influenced society’s view of school gardens. Currently, as sustainable living has become a hot topic, school gardens have resurfaced as a way to address health, environmental, and social justice issues. 

The Tisch Food Center recently released the GREEN (Garden Resources, Education, and Environment Nexus) Tool - a practical, flexible, evidence-based tool designed to help gardens grow deep roots in schools. The GREEN Tool enables advocates, educators, and policymakers identify strategies and resources to sustain school gardens over the long term.

Explore The GREEN Tool Research Brief, featuring the visual GREEN Tool Map illustrating pathways to establish, integrate, and sustain school gardens, school garden case studies, and policy recommendations.
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