NYC4CNR August 2015 Newsletter | Teachers College Columbia University

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NYC4CNR August 2015 Newsletter

The August newsletter for NYC4CNR, the policy coalition we co-convene.

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 
   

NYC4CNR Website

Action Alerts

21 Organizations Left to Go! Help us Get to 100!

We are still shy of our goal of 100 organizations signed on to the NYC4CNR policy platform.  We need to be ready to send our message to Congress now, while the 2015 CNR bill is being drafted in the Senate.  

 

Please do two things to help us reach our goal of 100 organizational supporters NOW:

  1. Sign it: click here to add your organization’s name to the list of supporters, and

  2. Share it: ask your partners to sign on as well.  We are asking every group aligned with NYC4CNR to send the organizational sign-on invitation email below to 5 other organizations.  Please share through social media as well, by using the suggested tweetsbelow.

Organizational Sign-on Invitation Email Link  

Organizational Sign-on Suggested Tweets

 

Next NYC4CNR General Meeting August 25, 2015 1:00-2:30 PM

The next general NYC4CNR meeting will be held at City Harvest on August 25.  We will update the Alliance on the progress of the Communications Plan, including Congressional Recess elected official visits, planning for the start of the NYC school year, Alliance member campaigns, among other topics.  Please send any agenda requests to David DeVaughn (ddevaughn@cityharvest.org) or Claire Uno (cu2155@tc.columbia.edu). While Congress is drafting the 2015 CNR, we are encouraging Alliance members, partners, and any others involved with child nutrition programs to share their CNR story on Twitter.  Tweet your story and a photo, using hashtag #CNR2015


Senator Gillibrand Visits Summer Meals Sites in NYC

On August 11, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand joined children at Sunset Park Recreation Center summer meals program in Brooklyn to highlight the need for healthy meal standards and to provide more children with quality, nutritious food throughout the summer. She was joined by New York State Assemblyman Felix OrtizCity Councilmember Carlos Menchaca, and numerous hunger advocates, including City HarvestNYCCAH, and Wellness in the Schools. This followed a similar press conference on August 10 at the Walter Crowley Intermediate School in Queens. Read more here.

Councilmember Rafael Espinal Jr. Hosting Summer Meals Week in Brooklyn through 8/14 
See details here.

Other Events:

If you or your organization know of any events related to the National School Lunch Program, theSchool Breakfast Program, the Summer Food Service Program, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), and/or the Child and Adult Care Food Program, please let us know so that we can advertise it to the Alliance.  Email David DeVaughn (ddevaughn@cityharvest.org) or Claire Uno (cu2155@tc.columbia.edu) with event information.

Legislative Update

Child Nutrition Act Progress

 

Boozman Marker BillThe new marker bill on summer meals, "Hunger Free Summer for Kids Act of 2015, S. 1966" would allow states to choose between non-congregate, summer EBT, and traditional congregate summer meals depending on needs.  The bill would allow non-congregate food service in areas that meet one of five criteria: 1) in communities not eligible to operate open summer meal sites, 2) in rural communities, 3) in cases of extreme weather or public safety concerns, 4) when sites are only open for one meal a day, and 5) when sites are open four days a week so that two meals can be sent home for the days the site is not open. The bill would also provide for summer EBT using the WIC EBT infrastructure, and would provide up to $30 per child per month.  Only children not served by the SFSP program would be eligible for the summer EBT benefits.  The bill is supported by Feeding America and Share Our Strength.

 

Some advocates have concerns about provisions in S. 1966, and are instead supporting the Summer Meals Act of 2015 and the Stop Child Summer Hunger Act of 2015, which provide different approaches to address summer hunger.  The Summer Meals Act of 2015 would provide for additional opportunities to use non-congregate food service in situations when it would increase participation.  The Summer Meals Act additionally includes the “seamless summer” provision, which would decrease the administrative burden on programs currently running both the Child and Adult Care Food Program and the Summer Food Service Program.  The Summer Meals Act would also expand SFSP to allow sponsors to serve up to three meals per day, or two meals and one snack, and would expand area eligibility, changing the requirement from 50% to 40% to allow more districts to participate in the program.  The Stop Child Summer Hunger Act would provide summer EBT benefits ($150 for each child for the summer) using the SNAP EBT infrastructure to families with children who qualify for free and reduced price meals during the school year.   FRAC supports the Summer Meals Act and the Stop Child Summer Hunger Act.

 

 

Some advocates have expressed concern that using WIC EBT infrastructure, as in S. 1966, would limit access for families living in states where WIC EBT infrastructure is not yet established.  Additionally, advocates have expressed concern that the WIC food package is more limited, and that WIC benefits are accepted at fewer stores than SNAP benefits.  There is also concern that opening up non-congregate food service opportunities to all SFAs is a risk to program integrity, and may result in some sponsors cutting programming at congregate food service sites.

WICInfant formula companies are out lobbying to limit WIC eligibility.  There is automatic WIC benefit eligibility (adjunctive) for people already on certain programs, like Medicaid, whose rolls have increased with the Affordable Care Act.  The rebate system for infant formula has companies claiming they are losing money on WIC, because fewer families are buying formula at full price. Many organizations are fighting back against this by saying that adjunctive eligibility was put in place to streamline and it is working it works.

 

CNR CHATTER

Ellen Teller at FRAC has shared three reasons why advocates would not support a Child Nutrition Act once the 2015 bill is drafted: 1) nutrition standards issues; 2) offsets with cuts to other programs that address hunger; and 3) the infant formula lobby successfully taking out the adjunctive eligibility for WIC.

Legislative Update

USDA Program Offering Free Fruits and Veggies Pays Off

According to a recent study from the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture, elementary schools across the state of Arkansas that participated in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP) experienced a significant drop in obesity rates. Specifically, the study found that obesity rates in schoolchildren declined from 20 percent to 17 percent following the incorporation of the program.

News Update

 

 - NYC4CNR Background -

 

What is the Alliance?
The NYC Alliance for CNR is a group of diverse stakeholders working together for a strong Child Nutrition Act.

What is the Child Nutrition Act?
The Child Nutrition Act governs the School Lunch and Breakfast Programs, WIC, and other federal programs that provide food and nutrition education to children and families.  Congress authorizes the legislation every 5 years.  The current bill expires on October 1, 2015.

Why is this bill important?
This is a once in a five year opportunity to make improvements to programs that feed and educate millions of children from infancy through adolescence.  In New York State alone, over 1.8 million children eat school lunch every day, and nearly half of those meals are eaten in NYC public schools. We are leading an action campaign for New Yorkers to engage in this debate.

   
     

Published Monday, Aug. 17, 2015

NYC4CNR August 2015 Newsletter

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 
   

NYC4CNR Website

Action Alerts

21 Organizations Left to Go! Help us Get to 100!

We are still shy of our goal of 100 organizations signed on to the NYC4CNR policy platform.  We need to be ready to send our message to Congress now, while the 2015 CNR bill is being drafted in the Senate.  

 

Please do two things to help us reach our goal of 100 organizational supporters NOW:

  1. Sign it: click here to add your organization’s name to the list of supporters, and

  2. Share it: ask your partners to sign on as well.  We are asking every group aligned with NYC4CNR to send the organizational sign-on invitation email below to 5 other organizations.  Please share through social media as well, by using the suggested tweetsbelow.

Organizational Sign-on Invitation Email Link  

Organizational Sign-on Suggested Tweets

 

Next NYC4CNR General Meeting August 25, 2015 1:00-2:30 PM

The next general NYC4CNR meeting will be held at City Harvest on August 25.  We will update the Alliance on the progress of the Communications Plan, including Congressional Recess elected official visits, planning for the start of the NYC school year, Alliance member campaigns, among other topics.  Please send any agenda requests to David DeVaughn (ddevaughn@cityharvest.org) or Claire Uno (cu2155@tc.columbia.edu). While Congress is drafting the 2015 CNR, we are encouraging Alliance members, partners, and any others involved with child nutrition programs to share their CNR story on Twitter.  Tweet your story and a photo, using hashtag #CNR2015


Senator Gillibrand Visits Summer Meals Sites in NYC

On August 11, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand joined children at Sunset Park Recreation Center summer meals program in Brooklyn to highlight the need for healthy meal standards and to provide more children with quality, nutritious food throughout the summer. She was joined by New York State Assemblyman Felix OrtizCity Councilmember Carlos Menchaca, and numerous hunger advocates, including City HarvestNYCCAH, and Wellness in the Schools. This followed a similar press conference on August 10 at the Walter Crowley Intermediate School in Queens. Read more here.

Councilmember Rafael Espinal Jr. Hosting Summer Meals Week in Brooklyn through 8/14 
See details here.

Other Events:

If you or your organization know of any events related to the National School Lunch Program, theSchool Breakfast Program, the Summer Food Service Program, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), and/or the Child and Adult Care Food Program, please let us know so that we can advertise it to the Alliance.  Email David DeVaughn (ddevaughn@cityharvest.org) or Claire Uno (cu2155@tc.columbia.edu) with event information.

Legislative Update

Child Nutrition Act Progress

 

Boozman Marker BillThe new marker bill on summer meals, "Hunger Free Summer for Kids Act of 2015, S. 1966" would allow states to choose between non-congregate, summer EBT, and traditional congregate summer meals depending on needs.  The bill would allow non-congregate food service in areas that meet one of five criteria: 1) in communities not eligible to operate open summer meal sites, 2) in rural communities, 3) in cases of extreme weather or public safety concerns, 4) when sites are only open for one meal a day, and 5) when sites are open four days a week so that two meals can be sent home for the days the site is not open. The bill would also provide for summer EBT using the WIC EBT infrastructure, and would provide up to $30 per child per month.  Only children not served by the SFSP program would be eligible for the summer EBT benefits.  The bill is supported by Feeding America and Share Our Strength.

 

Some advocates have concerns about provisions in S. 1966, and are instead supporting the Summer Meals Act of 2015 and the Stop Child Summer Hunger Act of 2015, which provide different approaches to address summer hunger.  The Summer Meals Act of 2015 would provide for additional opportunities to use non-congregate food service in situations when it would increase participation.  The Summer Meals Act additionally includes the “seamless summer” provision, which would decrease the administrative burden on programs currently running both the Child and Adult Care Food Program and the Summer Food Service Program.  The Summer Meals Act would also expand SFSP to allow sponsors to serve up to three meals per day, or two meals and one snack, and would expand area eligibility, changing the requirement from 50% to 40% to allow more districts to participate in the program.  The Stop Child Summer Hunger Act would provide summer EBT benefits ($150 for each child for the summer) using the SNAP EBT infrastructure to families with children who qualify for free and reduced price meals during the school year.   FRAC supports the Summer Meals Act and the Stop Child Summer Hunger Act.

 

 

Some advocates have expressed concern that using WIC EBT infrastructure, as in S. 1966, would limit access for families living in states where WIC EBT infrastructure is not yet established.  Additionally, advocates have expressed concern that the WIC food package is more limited, and that WIC benefits are accepted at fewer stores than SNAP benefits.  There is also concern that opening up non-congregate food service opportunities to all SFAs is a risk to program integrity, and may result in some sponsors cutting programming at congregate food service sites.

WICInfant formula companies are out lobbying to limit WIC eligibility.  There is automatic WIC benefit eligibility (adjunctive) for people already on certain programs, like Medicaid, whose rolls have increased with the Affordable Care Act.  The rebate system for infant formula has companies claiming they are losing money on WIC, because fewer families are buying formula at full price. Many organizations are fighting back against this by saying that adjunctive eligibility was put in place to streamline and it is working it works.

 

CNR CHATTER

Ellen Teller at FRAC has shared three reasons why advocates would not support a Child Nutrition Act once the 2015 bill is drafted: 1) nutrition standards issues; 2) offsets with cuts to other programs that address hunger; and 3) the infant formula lobby successfully taking out the adjunctive eligibility for WIC.

Legislative Update

USDA Program Offering Free Fruits and Veggies Pays Off

According to a recent study from the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture, elementary schools across the state of Arkansas that participated in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP) experienced a significant drop in obesity rates. Specifically, the study found that obesity rates in schoolchildren declined from 20 percent to 17 percent following the incorporation of the program.

News Update

 

 - NYC4CNR Background -

 

What is the Alliance?
The NYC Alliance for CNR is a group of diverse stakeholders working together for a strong Child Nutrition Act.

What is the Child Nutrition Act?
The Child Nutrition Act governs the School Lunch and Breakfast Programs, WIC, and other federal programs that provide food and nutrition education to children and families.  Congress authorizes the legislation every 5 years.  The current bill expires on October 1, 2015.

Why is this bill important?
This is a once in a five year opportunity to make improvements to programs that feed and educate millions of children from infancy through adolescence.  In New York State alone, over 1.8 million children eat school lunch every day, and nearly half of those meals are eaten in NYC public schools. We are leading an action campaign for New Yorkers to engage in this debate.

   
     
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