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Principals’ Perception of Universal Free Lunch: A Survey Analysis

A new report by the Tisch Food Center's Renata Peralta highlights principal support for New York City's universal free lunch program for middle schoolers. This report comes at a time when advocates are pressing the Mayor and City Council to expand this program to elementary and high schools. 

Mayor Bill de Blasio, working closely with the New York City Council, passed a budget on June 19, 2014 that included $6.25 million to provide free school lunch to middle school students during the 2014-15 school year. The specific policy took advantage of the federal Community Eligibility Provision, which states that any school (or group of schools) that has a certain proportion of high-needs students can use federal reimbursements to serve all students a free lunch. 

Because of initial concerns around implementation, and to determine early impacts of universal free lunch on schools, researchers at the Laurie M. Tisch Center for Food, Education & Policy in the Program in Nutrition, Teachers College, Columbia University distributed an online survey to all principals in standalone middle schools to determine any challenges or successes occurring in the first year. 

Read the key findings and details of the 2016 report Principals’ Perceptions of Universal Free Lunch: A Survey Analysis

 

Published Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016

Principals’ Perception of Universal Free Lunch: A Survey Analysis

Mayor Bill de Blasio, working closely with the New York City Council, passed a budget on June 19, 2014 that included $6.25 million to provide free school lunch to middle school students during the 2014-15 school year. The specific policy took advantage of the federal Community Eligibility Provision, which states that any school (or group of schools) that has a certain proportion of high-needs students can use federal reimbursements to serve all students a free lunch. 

Because of initial concerns around implementation, and to determine early impacts of universal free lunch on schools, researchers at the Laurie M. Tisch Center for Food, Education & Policy in the Program in Nutrition, Teachers College, Columbia University distributed an online survey to all principals in standalone middle schools to determine any challenges or successes occurring in the first year. 

Read the key findings and details of the 2016 report Principals’ Perceptions of Universal Free Lunch: A Survey Analysis

 

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