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Laurie M. Tisch Center for Food, Education & Policy

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Exploring the Relationship Between Teacher Interest and Student Success in Nutrition Education

A recent study in Prevention Science by Dr. Marissa Burgermaster and the Tisch Food Center team highlights the important role teachers play in classroom nutrition education programs.

Their findings support the idea that one of the best ways to improve classroom nutrition education is to have teachers who are excited and invested in the curriculum. Teacher interest and ability to engage students are perhaps more impactful than strictly adhering to curriculum guidelines. Additionally, students liking and being able to list core messages taught was correlated with adopting more healthy and fewer unhealthy behaviors.

With the ultimate goal of having great nutrition education for all students, teachers can really be allies in this effort. It is crucial to think about how we are supporting teachers as nutrition educators through professional development and policy. Examples could include nutrition education for pre-service teachers, strong state and local nutrition education standards, and supports for schools to integrate nutrition education from the classroom to the cafeteria.

 

This research was part of the Food, Health and Choices study, funded by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Grant no. 2010-85215-20661 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Human Nutrition and Obesity.

 

Published Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017

Exploring the Relationship Between Teacher Interest and Student Success in Nutrition Education

Their findings support the idea that one of the best ways to improve classroom nutrition education is to have teachers who are excited and invested in the curriculum. Teacher interest and ability to engage students are perhaps more impactful than strictly adhering to curriculum guidelines. Additionally, students liking and being able to list core messages taught was correlated with adopting more healthy and fewer unhealthy behaviors.

With the ultimate goal of having great nutrition education for all students, teachers can really be allies in this effort. It is crucial to think about how we are supporting teachers as nutrition educators through professional development and policy. Examples could include nutrition education for pre-service teachers, strong state and local nutrition education standards, and supports for schools to integrate nutrition education from the classroom to the cafeteria.

 

This research was part of the Food, Health and Choices study, funded by Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Grant no. 2010-85215-20661 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Human Nutrition and Obesity.

 

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