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Academic Catalog 2018-2019

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Applied Sciences of Learning and Special Education

Department of - Health & Behavior Studies

Contact Information

(212) 678-3880
(212) 678-8259
R. Douglas Greer, Laudan Jahromi, Ye Wang

Program Description

Applied Sciences of Learning and Special Education

The title of our cluster Applied Sciences of Learning and Special Education (changed from Special Education in 2012) more accurately reflects our epistemological perspective and expertise in teaching children with native disabilities, as well as our strong presence in the development of inclusive general education classrooms and teacher expertise. 

Along with fellow faculty in the Department of Health and Behavior Studies, we are committed to science-based approaches. We see the department as consisting of much of the expertise that is needed to promote effective educational outcomes for students: health and well-being, emotional stability, adequate nutrition, addiction prevention, and optimal teaching. Our particular contribution is the teaching, learning, and behavior development expertise.

Faculty in the Applied Sciences of Learning and Special Education are committed to the study of students who are academically or socially delayed, deaf or hard of hearing, literacy-challenged, economically disenfranchised, those who perform at or above the level of their peers, and culturally diverse children and adolescents, especially those from high-need urban and suburban schools.

We provide master's-level teacher preparation and doctoral-level programs designed to provide all children and adolescents with scientifically based, differentiated, and measurably effective instruction. Our programs build upon a century-old tradition of leading the field of special education in policy, practice, and research for individuals with disabilities across the age span.

Students who earn M.A., Ed.M., Ed.D., and Ph.D. degrees from Teachers College assume leadership and scholarly positions at all levels of professional activity including public and private schools, community and national service agencies, hospital and rehabilitation programs, colleges and universities, research centers, and local, state, and federal education agencies.

The programs in the Applied Sciences of Learning and Special Education cluster maintain close working relationships with a wide network of public and private schools, agencies, and clinical facilities, as well as centers here at Teachers College.

Degree Summary

APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS
Program Director: Professor R. Douglas Greer
Degrees Offered: Master of Arts (M.A.), Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES ON CAMPUS & DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES ONLINE
Program Director: Professor Laudan Jahromi
Degree Offered: Master of Arts (M.A.)

INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY/AUTISM
Program Director: Professor Laudan Jahromi
Degrees Offered: Master of Arts (M.A.), Master of Education (Ed.M.), Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING PROGRAM 
Program Director: Professor Ye Wang 
Degrees Offered: Master of Arts (M.A.), Master of Education (Ed.M.), Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

SEVERE OR MULTIPLE DISABILITIES- ANNOTATION 
Program Coordinator: Professor Laudan Jahromi
Degree Offered: Master of Arts (M.A.)

For a complete listing of degree requirements, please click the "Degrees" tab above

For a complete listing of degree requirements, please continue on to this program's "Degrees" section in this document

Degree Requirements

General Masters Information

Master’s Degree General Information

The M.A. and Ed.M. programs are designed to prepare students for positions as teachers and clinicians who serve individuals with a full range of abilities and disabilities in a wide array of settings based in schools, communities, and agencies. They specialize in serving individuals with the above-mentioned disabilities and those without disabilities at specific age levels.

Candidates for the degrees must complete supervised practica requirements (see specific program description for more information). They also must complete an integrative project or, in the case of the Intellectual Disability/Autism Programs, complete a comprehensive examination in addition to the integrative project prior to award of the degree. In designated dual certification programs, Master’s degree coursework also fulfills the requirements for New York State Certification as a General Education Teacher, Teacher of Students with Disabilities, Teacher of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and/or Licensed Behavior Analyst at a specific age level.

Masters Degree's Specialization Areas:

  • Applied Behavior Analysis
  • Deaf and Hard of Hearing 
  • Developmental Disabilities
  • Intellectual Disability/Autism 
  • Severe or Multiple Disabilities


Applied Behavior Analysis (M.A.)

Master of Arts in the Program in Teaching as Applied Behavior Analysis

Our program is recognized for its excellence in training teachers in using scientific tools to bridge the educational gap and accelerate learning for all children (Greer, 2007). It is also internationally recognized for training teachers, researchers, and leaders in early educational and language developmental interventions for children with autism spectrum disorders (ages 2-5) and effective inclusion practices. Our graduates are expert in identifying missing verbal developmental stages (Greer & Du, 2015; Greer & Keohane, 2007, 2009; Greer & Ross, 2008—see cabasschools.org for a complete list of publications ) and providing interventions that result in children attaining developmental stages when they are missing.

The objective of our M.A. program is to prepare teachers and teacher trainers to use measurably effective instructional practices to accelerate all children’s educational progress, including measurable increases in enjoying learning and schooling, academic literacy, problem solving, and self-management. A key to doing this is the acceleration of children’s language development, which appears to be the root problem faced by English language learners, minority children from economically disenfranchised families, and children with autism spectrum diagnoses. Recent research findings provide exciting new ways to do this. Moreover, accelerated instruction is needed for children from well-to-do-families, if we are to assume international leadership in education. In order to meet these objectives, we provide instructional experiences to teach our graduate-student teacher trainees the following aspects of effective teaching:

  • Utilize research-based procedures for all aspects and subject areas of teaching preschool and elementary-age children.
  • Manage classrooms and schools such that children are well behaved and motivated to learn, using positive and non-coercive practices.
  • Master the existing science of learning and teaching as it is applied to the varied needs of children.
  • Master protocols to identify and induce missing language developmental cusps and capabilities that result in children learning to learn material they could not learn before and how to learn in new ways (e.g., by observation and incidental experiences).
  • Master how to use key educational standards and how to match existing tested curricula and tested teaching practices to categories of students and individual students in order to ensure that the standards are achieved.
  • Master how to continuously and directly measure all students’ progress in achieving standards and new developmental stages and use that measurement to drive instructional practice, including the selection of alternative scientific practices when initial best practices are not successful with children.
  • Master how to scientifically analyze the source of student learning problems and inadequate teaching.
  • Learn to draw on evidence from cognitive learning and developmental research and reading/writing literacy research implemented through procedures from teaching as applied behavior analysis.
  • Master how to teach children to be self-learners.

The Teaching as Applied Behavior Analysis Program is an approach to teacher training in which all instruction used by teachers is based on scientific evidence and the use of scientific procedures to fit the appropriate science-based practices to individual students’ varied learning and language developmental needs. The program prepares graduates to be dually certified to teach students from birth to Grade 6.  Students may also apply for certification in other states according to state-specific processes and inter-state reciprocal agreements. The program is also a Behavior Analyst Certification Board Verified Course Sequence, providing coursework and experience hours required to sit for the Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) exam upon successful completion of the program.  During the two-year MA program, students complete student teaching requirements and full-time internships in schools and classrooms that practice teaching as applied behavior analysis, under the mentorship of PhD students or graduates who are certified teachers. The training of teachers is also based on scientifically tested procedures (i.e., we teach our graduate students until they demonstrate mastery of using scientific practices). Teacher trainees are taught until they master the science and its application with all children from 2 years to grade 6.

All of the training is done in classrooms that practice the CABAS® or CABAS® Accelerated Independent Learner Model (AIL). Students are trained in paid internship positions, under the supervision of experienced scientist-practitioners in the school placements, and attend classes in the evening. What is done with the children in the classrooms is the content of the nine core graduate courses--scientific findings and teaching procedures.  What is taught in the core courses and the related courses is placed into practice daily. The effectiveness of the numerous procedures is well documented in the literature. Recent evidence concerning the outcomes for the children in the classes in which our trainees are taught show that the children perform from two to four levels above their current grade level on standardized tests across reading, language, and mathematics. These children include those who receive free or reduced-price lunch, minority children, English language learners, children with learning delay diagnoses, and upper middle-class children. Teachers and teacher assistants collect direct measures of all the children’s responses to instruction and the achievement of state standards. The model classrooms where our M.A. and Ph.D. graduate students are trained include the Fred S. Keller Preschool (children with and without diagnoses from 18 months to age 5), the Morristown AIL classes Pre-K to 6, and Rockland BOCES elementary district-based classes. Our full-time and adjunct faculty members are onsite in the schools on a regular basis and are accountable for outcomes for our teacher trainees and the children they teach.

All of the work in the classroom and school settings is tied to the ten core courses in Teaching as Applied Behavior Analysis that are devoted to classroom management, curriculum design, effective pedagogical practices, and the advancement of a science of teaching. The other classes in the program are devoted to various scientific approaches to instruction, learning, and development. M.A. students rotate placements across different types of students and ages until they achieve minimal mastery of the relevant scientifically based teaching repertoires. The M.A. program lasts for two years, and the Ph.D. requires three to four years of additional training.    

Successful applicants will present evidence of excellent undergraduate academic performance in liberal arts degrees or degrees with strong liberal arts requirements, strong recommendations, and a passion for working with children whose future prognosis depends on highly effective instructional interventions. The program is academically rigorous, and the applied component is demanding. Graduates of the program are highly sought after by public schools and graduate programs. Between 15 and 25 applicants are accepted annually.

There are other approaches to teaching and the training of teachers and some who wish to become teachers will find those approaches more in keeping with their goals. But for those who are interested in a measurably effective and scientific approach and who are committed to bridging the educational gap and high quality education for all children, we invite you to join us in what we find to be exceptionally exciting and rewarding work.

Specialization Requirements, Applied Behavior Analysis:

  • HBSE 4015     Applied behavior analysis I: Pedagogy, Curriculum, and Management
  • HBSE 4016     Applied behavior analysis II: Pedagogy, Curriculum, and Management
  • HBSE 4017     Applied behavior analysis III: Pedagogy, Curriculum, and Management:
  • HBSE 4044     Curricular and pedagogical foundations for teaching pre-listening through early academic literacy
  • HBSE 4045     Curricular and pedagogical operations for teaching the foundations of functional academic literacy
  • HBSE 4046     Curricular and pedagogical operations for teaching advanced functional academic literacy (4th grade through early middle school)
  • HBSE 4048     Working with Families of Children with Autism
  • HBSE 4049     Professional and ethical issues in behavior analysis 
  • HBSE 4704     Observation and student teaching in special education: Applied behavioral analysis and behavioral disorders (4 terms)
  • HBSE 4047     Record-Keeping in Applied Behavior Analysis (required for NYS licensure in ABA)

Breadth Requirement:

For the list of required cognate courses that provide breadth scholarship and practice, contact the program coordinator or the special education secretary. In order to broaden the student’s background in education, three Teachers College courses outside the Teachers College major program (in this case, a course is defined as one for which at least two points are earned) must be completed.

  • HBSK 4072: Theory and Techniques of Assessment and Intervention in Reading
  • HUDK 4027: Development of Mathematical Thinking
  • HBSK 4074: Reading and Comprehension Strategies and Study Skills

(Alternately, students may take HBSK 5099: Writing Interventions Theory and Practice in lieu of one of the reading courses if scheduling conflicts exist)


Deaf and Hard of Hearing (M.A./Ed.M.)

Master of Arts/ Master of Education options in the Program in the Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (M.A./Ed.M.)

The Master of Arts (M.A.) with certification is a 40-credit program leading to New York State (NYS) initial certification as Teacher of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.

The Master of Arts (M.A.) without certification is a 32 to 40-credit program leading to a Masters Degree in Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. This program does not lead to New York State (NYS) ceritifcation as Teacher of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.

The Master of Education (Ed.M.) is a 60-credit program leading to dual New York State (NYS) initial certification as Teacher of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing as well as certification in one of the following areas: Early Childhood Teacher, Elementary Education Teacher, Secondary Teacher in a particular subject area (English, Math, Science, or Social Studies) or Reading Specialist.

All programs noted above also lead to Council on the Education of the Deaf (CED) certification. 

Specialization Requirements, Deaf and Hard of Hearing:

  • HBSE 4070     Psychosocial and cultural aspects of people who are Deaf 
or hard of hearing
  • HBSE 4071     Language and literacy for the Deaf and hard of hearing (two terms)
  • HBSE 4072     Development of language of individuals who are Deaf or hard of hearing
  • HBSE 4073     Listening and spoken language/ Audiological principles (two terms)
  • HBSE 4079     Language development and habilitation: The foundations/ Auditing Verbal Therapy
  • HBSE 4300     Practicum in assessment and evaluation of individuals with exceptionalities
  • HBSE 4707     Observation and student teaching in special education - 
Deaf and hard of hearing (two terms)
  • HBSE 4871     American Sign Language I
  • HBSE 4872     American Sign Language II
  • Area specialization courses in Deaf and Hard of hearing (15+ points)

Breadth Requirements:

In order to broaden the student’s background in education, three Teachers College courses outside the Teachers College major department must be completed (in this case, a course is defined as one for which at least two points are earned). These courses should be selected from the following areas:

  • Age-appropriate developmental psychology course
  • Educational foundations/or multicultural course
  • Health requirement
  • Technology requirement


New York State Education Department (NYSED) has teacher certification requirements that are needed for program completion and graduation which are listed in the Office of Teacher Education section of the catalog.


Developmental Disabilities (M.A.)

Master of Arts: Developmental Disabilities (ON CAMPUS or ONLINE)

The M.A. in Developmental Disabilities On Campus and M.A. in Developmental Disabilities Online programs do not lead to New York State teacher certification, and are available to interested students with a broad range of career goals. This program is designed to provide multidisciplinary training in the study of individuals with developmental disabilities. Students will engage in multidisciplinary coursework in special education and across other disiciplines (e.g., psychology, health, and/or leadership), gain specialized preparation for working with individuals with developmental disabilities, such as autism and/or intellectual disabilities, and gain expertise in designing effective programming for individuals with the full range of learning and behavior characteristics.

Required Department Courses:

  • HBSE 4000     Introduction to special education
  • HBSE 4002     Instruction and curriculum for students with and without disabilities
  • HBSE 4005     Computer applications in special education
  • HBSE 4006     Working with families of children with disabilities
  • HBSE 4010     Nature and needs of persons with intellectual disability/autism
  • HBSE 4011     Education of persons with intellectual disability/autism
  • HBSE 4082     Assessment and evaluation of infants, children, and youth with exceptionalities
  • HBSE 4880     Opportunities and outcomes for people with disabilities

Breadth Requirements:

In addition to required courses, students will select a sub-specialization area in which they will take interdisciplinary coursework outside of special education (e.g., psychology, health, policy, and/or leadership). The sub-specialization area will be selected from a rich array of offerings at Teachers College in light of the student's background and career goals.


Intellectual Disability/Autism (M.A. and Ed.M.)

Master of Arts options in Intellectual Disability/Autism (M.A. and Ed.M.)

These programs are designed for individuals who do not already hold New York State initial or professional certification as a teacher of students with disabilities.  All programs prepare pre-service teachers to work with students with disabilities in inclusive and specialized settings. Through coursework and practicum experiences, the programs foster the acquisition of the broad-based knowledge and skills needed to provide effective educational programs for students with the full range of learning and behavior characteristics. In addition, the programs provide specialized preparation in working with children with intellectual disability and/or Autism Spectrum Disorder at specific age levels. This is accomplished through required coursework in general education content areas and psychology as well as a special education core including coursework and a variety of fieldwork experiences. In addition, specialized coursework and practicum experiences are provided that focus on students with intellectual disability and Autism Spectrum Disorder. The programs are fully aligned with the New York State Learning Standards.

  • Master of Education (M.Ed.) Degree Program in Intellectual Disability/Autism: Early Childhood (ITDE-DUAL) - for individuals who seek NYS dual certification in Early Childhood and Students with Disabilities (birth through grade 2). This 60-point full-time program typically requires two years to complete.
  • Master of Arts (MA) Degree Program in Intellectual Disability/Autism:  Childhood (grades 1-6)  (ITDS-DUAL) - for individuals who seek NYS dual certification in Childhood and Students with Disabilities (grades 1-6). This 43-point full-time program typically requires one and a half years to complete.
  • Master of Arts (MA) Degree in Teaching Students with Intellectual Disability/Autism: Adolescent Generalist (grades 7-12) (ITDA-INIT) - for individuals who seek NYS initial certification in Students with Disabilities - generalist (grades 7-12). This 38-point full-time program typically requires one and a half years to complete.
  • Master of Arts (MA) in Intellectual Disability/Autism (grades 1-6) (ITDC-TRAN - Peace Corps Fellow Program): This MA program is restricted to students who have been admitted to the Peace Corps Fellows Program and requires participation in the pre-service summer component and other activities associated with that program. The program leads to NYS transitional-B certification at the childhood (grades 1-6) level.  This 36-point program typically requires two years to complete.

Specialization Requirements, Intellectual Disability/Autism:

  • HBSE 4000     Introduction to special education
  • HBSE 4002     Instruction and curriculum for students with and without disabilities
  • HBSE 4005     Computer applications in special education
  • HBSE 4006     Working with families of children with disabilities
  • HBSE 4010     Nature and needs of persons with intellectual disability/autism
  • HBSE 4011     Education of persons with intellectual disability/autism
  • HBSE 4015     Applied behavior analysis I
  • HBSE 4079     Language development and habilitation
  • HBSE 4082     Assessment and evaluation of infants, children, and youth with exceptionalities
  • HBSE 4300     Practicum in assessment and evaluation of individuals with exceptionalities
  • HBSE 4700     Field observation in special education: Pre-student teaching
  • HBSE 4701     Observation and student teaching in special education: Intellectual disability/autism (two terms)
  • HBSE 4880     Opportunities and outcomes for people with disabilities  

Breadth Requirements:

In order to broaden the student’s background in education, three Teachers College courses outside the Teachers College major department must be completed (in this case, a course is defined as one for which at least two points are earned). These courses should be selected from the following areas:

  • Age-appropriate developmental psychology course
  • Educational foundations course
  • Health requirement
  • Technology requirement
  • Reading course


New York State Education Department (NYSED) has teacher certification requirements that are needed for program completion and graduation which are listed in the Office of Teacher Education section of the catalog.


Severe or Multiple Disabilities (M.A.)

Master of Arts: Severe or Multiple Disabilities

The MA Degree Program in Teaching Students with Multiple or Severe Disabilities approved teacher prepation progrm is designed for individuals who already hold a valid New York State base certificate in any of the following titles: Students with Disabilities, Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Speech and Language Disabilities, and Blind and Visually Impaired.  Graduates who meet all requirements of the program, and who complete all state requirements, will be recommended to New York State for an Annotation in the Teaching of Students with Multiple/Severe Disabilities in recognition of additional pedagogical knowledge, skills, and experiences in the teaching of students with severe/multiple disabilities.  The Severe or Multiple Annotation certificate type will depend on the aforementioned valid NYS-base certificate title and certificate type that the candidate holds at the time of the institutional recommendation for certificatation as the Annotation is an extension to the existing certificate. 

This program prepares teachers to work with students with severe or multiple disabilities in inclusive and specialized settings. Through coursework and practicum experiences, the program fosters the acquisition of the specialized knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to provide effective educational programs for students with severe and multiple disabilities. This 32-point program typically takes one year to complete (Fall through Summer).

Required Department Courses:

  • HBSE 4005     Computer applications in special education
  • HBSE 4006     Working with families of children with disabilities
  • HBSE 4010     Nature and needs of persons with intellectual disability/autism
  • HBSE 4011     Education of persons with intellectual disability/autism
  • HBSE 4015     Applied behavior analysis I
  • HBSE 4071     Language and Literacy for Deaf/Hard of Hearing
  • HBSE 4082     Assessment and evaluation of infants, children, and youth with exceptionalities
  • HBSE 4701     Observation and student teaching in special education: Intellectual disability/autism
  • HBSE 4880     Opportunities and outcomes for people with disabilities

 Breadth Requirements:

  • Students choose breadth coursework (6 credits total) outside the major program in line with their professional goals.

New York State Education Department (NYSED) has teacher certification requirements that are needed for program completion and graduation which are listed in the Office of Teacher Education section of the catalog.


Doctor of Philosophy

Doctor of Philosophy Exceptionality Focus Areas:

  • Applied Behavior Analysis
  • Intellectual Disability/Autism
  • Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Research and Evaluation Emphasis:

Students with excellent potential as researchers and theoreticians who are interested in scholarly careers in special education, education, and related social sciences may apply for the Ph.D. degree program, which represents the highest level of achievement in the Arts and Sciences. This degree program is administered jointly by Teachers College and the graduate faculty of Columbia University. Prospective students may obtain information on program offerings by contacting the program office.

 Ph.D. Program in Teaching as Applied Behavior Analysis

The Teaching as Applied Behavior Analysis M.A. and Ph.D. programs incorporate an approach to teacher training in which all instruction used by teachers is based on scientific evidence and the use of scientific procedures to fit the appropriate science-based practices to individual students’ varied learning and language developmental needs. The M.A. program prepares graduates to be dually certified from birth to grade 6 in New York State and reciprocal states. Students accepted in the program are placed in paid teacher assistant positions (M.A. students and Ph.D. students taking the M.A. core) or paid teacher positions (Ph.D. students who have completed at least 3 semesters of the M.A. core) in schools and classrooms that practice teaching as applied behavior analysis. The training of teachers is also based on scientifically tested procedures.  Teacher trainees are taught until they master the science and its application with all children from 2 years through grade 5.

Research is a central component of the training—both the applications of research using science-based tactics and measurement and the generation of new research. The focus of the M.A. program is in the application of scientific procedures in classrooms, while Ph.D. students engage in research throughout their program, building on their research training in the M.A. and culminating in a dissertation that identifies and investigates a topic related to our mission. Dissertations must make contributions to both the applied and basic science. The faculty and the students generate a substantial body of research leading to publications and presentations at international scientific conferences each year, and this is a key component of the Ph.D. training. Programmatic research is conducted in the following areas: effective classroom practices, language/verbal development interventions that result in children learning to learn in different ways, observational learning, and systems-wide scientific approaches to education.

Students who already hold M.A. degrees from other institutions must take the ten M.A. core courses, because the core prepares them with the means to be successful in completing milestone Ph.D. requirements. Ph.D. students also need to be dually certified in New York State for teaching children from birth to grade 6. The teaching placement is a critical part of the program, because it provides the opportunities to train M.A. students and to be involved in cutting-edge research.  In that role Ph.D. students are critical instructors for the first- and second-year M.A. students, an experience that prepares the doctoral candidate to teach and mentor graduate-level students. Our Ph.D. candidate teachers play a significant role in our record of providing measurably superior instruction and bridging the educational gap.  For more information please see the Teaching as Applied Behavior Analysis M.A. program description.

Department Courses Required for All Student Majors in Degree Program

Core Requirements for all Ph.D. Special Education Majors

  • HBSE 5010     Study of the philosophic foundations of special education
  • HBSE 6001     Research in special education: Research/experimental design
  • HBSE 6005     Research in special education: Single-case design
  • HBSE 6010     Advanced study of problems and issues in special education
  • HBSE 7500     Dissertation seminar in special education
  • HBSE 8900-8910     Dissertation advisement in special education

Non-Department Courses Required for All Student Majors in Degree Program

  • HUDM 4122     Probability and statistical inference
  • HUDM 5122     Applied regression analysis

Specialization Requirements, Applied Behavior Analysis:

  • HBSE 5304     Advanced practica in special education: Behavioral disorders
  • HBSE 5904     Problems in special education: Behavioral disorders
  • HBSE 5915     Supervision and administration of special education and human resources agencies through organizational behavior analysis
  • HBSE 6008     Behaviorism
  • HBSE 6015     The verbal behavior model: Individual educational programming
  • HBSE 6031     Single-case experimental design in education, medicine, and therapy
  • HBSE 6504     Advanced seminar in special education: Applied behavior analysis and behavioral disorders

Ph.D. Program in the Education of the Deaf/Hard of Hearing 

The Ph.D. doctoral program is divided into several areas of study including 1) advanced study in general special education, the philosophy of science, and theory building; 2) advanced study in a minimum of two paradigms of research; 3) advanced study in the education of the deaf and hard of hearing, including advanced study in linguistics, psycholinguistics, and developmental psycholinguistics; and 4) a professional spe­cialization. 

The Ph.D. in Deaf and Hard of Hearing is administered and awarded through the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Columbia University and requires the equivalent of an undergraduate liberal arts degree. The degree requires a minimum of 54 credits beyond the master’s degree and presumes a background in and/or direct professional experience in working with individuals who are Deaf or hard of hearing.

Core Requirements for all Ph.D. Special Education majors (15):

  • HBSE 5010     Study of the philosophic foundations of special education (3)
  • HBSE 6001 & 6005 Research in special education (6 total)
  • HBSE 6010     Advanced study of problems and issues in special education (3)
  • HBSE 7500     Dissertation seminar in special education (3)
  • HBSE 8907     Dissertation advisement in special education: Deaf and hard of hearing (0)

Research Requirement (15)

  • HUDM 4122     Probability and statistical inference (3)
  • HUDM 5122     Applied regression analysis (3)
  • HUDM 5123     Linear Models (3)

Advanced Statistics/Research/Evaluation/Measurements Courses (examples listed below)

  • HUDM 5059     Psychological Measurement (3)
  • HUDM 6122     Multivariate Analysis I (3)

Area of Concentration: Deaf and Hard of Hearing  (18):

Deaf and Hard of Hearing (6)

  • HBSE 5907     Problems in special education: Deaf and hard of hearing (3)
  • HBSE 6507     Advanced seminar in special education: Deaf and hard of hearing (3)

Depending upon the student’s background, the student is expected to choose 12 credit hours of study in a specialization area determined through advisement.

Ph.D. Program in Intellectual Disability/Autism

Intellectual Disability/Autism is one of the exceptionality focus areas that may be selected by applicants to the Ph.D. Programs in Special Education. Individuals who are interested in careers as researchers and scholars in the field of developmental disabilities or special education, inclusive education, and related social sciences may apply for the Ph.D. degree program (84 credits), which represents the highest level of achievement in the Arts and Sciences.

The doctoral program in Intellectual Disability/Autism is a research-intensive program designed to prepare graduates for a variety of academic and professional roles in the field of developmental disabilities. Given our program’s strong research emphasis, all doctoral students will take rigorous statistics and research methods coursework. In addition, we practice a research-apprenticeship model of student mentorship and training, thus all students will engage in research activities with faculty members. Doctoral students may orient their preparation towards careers as college and university professors, researchers, program directors, or curriculum and instructional evaluators.

Successful doctoral candidates will pass a doctoral certification examination in general special education and will complete a doctoral certification project in their area of specialization. Upon achieving official status as a doctoral candidate, students will be eligible to select a faculty committee and begin work on their doctoral dissertation research.

Procedures for admission to the Ph.D. program in Special Education in the Department of Health and Behavior Studies at Teachers College are administered jointly by the Office of Admission and the Department. Applicants are evaluated according to the following criteria:

1. Strong academic record and potential,
2. GRE scores,
3. Two to three years of successful teaching experience in special education and/or evidence of strong applied or basic research experience in a related field (e.g., empirical Master’s thesis, conference presentations, and/or peer-reviewed publications).
4. Scholarly and professional promise,
5. Appropriate fit with faculty research,
6. Appropriate career objectives,
7. English proficiency (TOEFL score of at least 600), if applicable,
8. Non-academic attributes which demonstrate ability to meet the challenges of working with people with developmental disabilities and conducting research with this population,
9. Academic or professional writing sample.


Course requirements in each of the following categories must be satisfied in order to complete the 84-credit Ph.D. program:

Master’s-level courses in Intellectual Disability/Autism (30 credits total):

Core Coursework in the Applied Sciences of Learning and Special Education (24)

  • HBSE 5010     Study of the philosophic foundations of special education (3)
  • HBSE 6010     Advanced study of problems and issues in special education (3)
  • HBSE 5901     Problems in Special Education – Intellectual Disability/autism (3)
  • HBSE 6501-I  Advanced seminar in Intellectual Disability/autism (3)
  • HBSE 6501-II Advanced seminar in Intellectual Disability/autism or Seminar in Deaf/Hard of Hearing or Seminar in School Psychology (3)
  • HBSE 6001     Research in Special Education: Group Design (3)
  • HBSE 6005     Research in Special Education: Single Case Design (3)
  • HBSE 7500     Dissertation Seminar (3)

Coursework in Statistics and Research Methodology (15)

  • HUDM 4122     Probability & Statistical Inference (3)
  • HUDM 5122     Applied Regression Analysis (3)
  • HUDM 5123     Linear Models and Experimental Design (3)
  • Advanced Statistics, Research Methods, Evaluation, or Measurement Course (3)
  • Advanced Statistics, Research Methods, Evaluation, or Measurement Course (3)

Specialization Electives (15)

  • Elective Coursework (15)

Areas of specialization include:
Health, Neuroscience, Movement, or Communication Sciences
Developmental, Counseling, or School Psychology
Educational Policy or Organization & Leadership
Diversity & Multicultural Studies
Research Methodology


Application Information

All applicants: Interviews are required for applicants to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing and Intellectual Disability/Autism programs. Other program coordinators may arrange for applicants to have an admissions interview.

M.A. applicants: Experience in special education is not a prerequisite for acceptance.

Doctoral applicants: Submit an academic or professional writing sample.

 

Major Codes and Degrees

APPLIED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS (ABAS)
Program Director: R. Douglas Greer
Degrees Offered: Master of Arts (M.A.), Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES (MA-DDIS) & DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES ONLINE (DDID)
Program Director: Professor Laudan Jahromi
Degree Offered: Master of Arts (M.A.)

INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY/AUTISM
Program Director: Professor Laudan Jahromi
Degrees Offered:

  • Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.): Intellectual disability/autism (ITDS)
  • Master of Arts (M.A.)
    • Intellectual disability/autism dual certification (ITDS-DUAL)
    • Intellectual disability/autism at the adolescence level-initial certification (ITDA-INIT)
    • Intellectual disability/autism and childhood education-transitional B certification (ITDC-DUAL)
  • Master of Education (Ed.M.)
    • Intellectual disability/autism and early childhood education-initial dual certification (ITDE-DUAL)

DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING PROGRAM 
Program Director: Professor Ye Wang 
Degrees Offered:

  • Deaf and Hard of hearing (M.A.) DHEA
  • Deaf and Hard of hearing and early childhood education (Ed.M.) DHEI-DUAL
  • Deaf and Hard of hearing and childhood education (Ed.M.) DHCI-DUAL
  • Deaf and Hard of hearing and reading specialist  (Ed.M.) DHRI-DUAL
  • Deaf and Hard of hearing and adolescence education (Ed.M.) DHAE-DUAL
  • Deaf and Hard of hearing (Ph.D.) DHEA

SEVERE OR MULTIPLE DISABILITIES- ANNOTATION
Program Director: Professor Laudan Jahromi
Degree Offered: Master of Arts (M.A.)

  • Master of Arts (MA) Degree Program in Severe/Multiple Disabilities leading to an Annotation in Severe/Multiple Disabilities (MULT-ANOT)

Faculty List

Faculty

Lecturers

Visiting Faculty

Adjunct

Full-Time Instructors

Instructors

Adjunct Assistant Professor
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Adjunct Associate Professor
Adjunct Associate Professor
Associate Professor of Applied Behavior Analysis
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Professor of Psychology and Education
Lecturer
Associate Professor of Psychology & Education
Instructor
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Research Assistant
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Associate Professor of Deaf and Hard of Hearing

For up to date information about course offerings including faculty information, please visit the online course schedule.

Course List

HBSE 4000 Introduction to special education

Emphasis is placed on the identification of characteristics of individuals with disabilities and the impact of the characteristics on the learner and family members of the learner. The course is a study of the nature, psychosocial, and educational needs of individuals across the lifespan with physical, mental, emotional, or sensory impairments. Particular attention is placed on the way these special education programs fit, or should fit, into ongoing work in schools.

HBSE 4001 Teaching students with disabilities in the general education classroom

This course addresses problems of educational assessment, curriculum and teaching, organization, and guidance of students with physical, cognitive, affective, and sensory disabilities.

HBSE 4005 Applications of technology in special education

This course is intended to provide preservice and in-service special education teachers with basic information on assistive and instructional technology appropriate for use with infants, children, and youths who require special education and related services.

HBSE 4006 Working with families of children with disabilities

Current and historical perspectives on parent involvement in the special education and empowerment of infants, children, and youth with exceptionalities and their families. Emphasis on strategies and materials to facilitate a continuum of parent and family participation to strengthen the relationships between home, school, and the community. Students are trained in conflict resolution. Students in ID/Autism programs must perform a minimum of 14 hours of support to a family with a child with an exceptionality.

HBSE 4010 Nature and needs of persons with intellectual disability/autism

Characteristics of persons manifesting different degrees of intellectual disability/autism and other developmental disabilities from early childhood through adolescence. The course emphasizes implications for educational programming, curriculum, and instruction. 

HBSE 4011 Education of persons with intellectual disability/autism

Curriculum development and research-validated methods of instructing students with intellectual disability/autism and other developmental disabilities from early childhood through adolescence across ability levels.

HBSE 4015 Applied behavior analysis I
Basic applications for learners without reading or writing repertoires. Strategic applications of the science of behavior to instruction, management, curriculum-based assessment, isolation of locus of learning/behavior problems, and measurably effective instructional practices.
HBSE 4016 Applied behavior analysis II

Prerequisite: HBSE 4015. Advanced applications to learners with writing, reading, and self-editing repertoires. Teaching operations and curricula designed to teach academic literacy, self-management, and problem solving. Data-based applications required.

HBSE 4017 Applied behavior analysis III: School-wide systems applications
Applications of behavior analysis to the schooling system that incorporates educating and working with families, providing classroom and school leadership, coordinating support personnel efforts across the school and home, and the development of learner independence through advanced scientifically based pedagogy and functional curriculum design, including computer-based instruction.
HBSE 4044 Curricular and pedagogical foundations for teaching pre-listening through early academic literacy

Pedagogical and curricular design repertoires for realizing state educational objectives for children from pre-listener to early reader skills (NYSED Standards, English Excellence in Education Standards, and CABAS® Standards Preschool through Kindergarten).

HBSE 4045 Curricular and pedagogical operations for teaching the foundations of functional academic literacy

Pedagogical and curricular repertoires for realizing state educational objectives for children with early to advanced self-editing and self-management repertoires (grades 1 through 3).

HBSE 4046 Curricular and pedagogical operations for teaching advanced functional academic literacy

Pedagogical and curricular repertoires for realizing state educational objectives for children with early to advanced self-editing and self-management repertoires (grades 4 through middle school).

HBSE 4070 Psychosocial and cultural aspects of people who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing

Introduction to the education of children, youth, and adults who are deaf or hard of hearing; historical development; psychosocial and cultural aspects; problems and issues of the field.

HBSE 4071 Language and Literacy I: Reading & Writing for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Study of special methods of teaching in programs for children and youth who are deaf or hard of hearing at preschool, elementary, and secondary levels, with particular attention to the development of reading and writing.

HBSE 4071 Language and Literacy II: Content Areas for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Study of special methods of teaching in programs for children and youth who are deaf or hard of hearing at preschool, elementary, and secondary levels, with particular attention to the development of language within the content areas.

HBSE 4072 Language development for the deaf and hard of hearing

Language development of hearing and deaf or hard of hearing individuals at different maturational levels.

HBSE 4073 Teaching Speech, Language/Audiological Principles

Course addresses audiological principles necessary to enable teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students to best support these student in their educational settings. The course also covers various communication approaches in deaf education, phonetics, and techniques to develop speech, language, listening, and functional communication skills. The course provides study of theory, research, and practical audiological information as well as hands-on experiences with the most current audiological equipment.

HBSE 4079 Language Development and Rehabilitation
Depending on the section offered, the course may focus on either of the two areas below:
 
The Foundations I
A review of the functions of language and communication, the nature and characteristics of language acquisition of typical language learners, the characteristics of language development in special populations, and assessment, curricular and intervention issues. 
 
The Foundations/Auditory Verbal Therapy II
Explores the underpinnings for audition and spoken language acquisition through Auditory Verbal/Auditory Oral approaches using evidence-based research. Specific techniques, strategies, and teaching behaviors to (re)habilitate and develop listening and spoken language in young children and adolescents with varying degrees of hearing loss will be practiced.
HBSE 4082 Assessment and evaluation of infants, children, and youth with exceptionalities

Enrollment limited to 20 per term. An in-depth study of theoretical principles of measurement, assessment, and evaluation necessary for appropriate identification of needs as related to implementation of educational plans for infants, children, and youth with disabilities. Applications of assessment data in instructional programs for children with disabilities. Students complete approximately 50 hours of assessments and evaluations of infants, children, youths, and young adults with disabilities, as part of the course, through work in the Dean Hope Center and the Harlem Tutoring Program. Special fee: $150 (for on campus course only). Students participate in an additional, weekly lab session.

HBSE 4092 Introduction to foundations of special education opportunity

Theory and practice in the rehabilitation and redress of human relationships affecting people with disabilities across the lifespan.

HBSE 4300 Practicum in assessment and evaluation of individuals with exceptionalities

Supervisors affiliated with the Dean Hope Center. Permission required. Permission required. Participation in interdisciplinary, psychoeducational assessment of deaf and hard of hearing children. Analysis of observational and test data; formulation of educational programs for deaf and hard of hearing learners. Conducted in the Dean Hope Center or in appropriate community facilities. Course meets the equivalent of one full day a week. Focus of course is on deaf/hard of hearing.

HBSE 4700 Observation and student teaching in special education: Pre-student teaching
Permission required. Course requires 3-5 days a week for participation in community, school, and agency programs and a weekly seminar on campus.
HBSE 4701 Observation and student teaching in special education: Intellectual disability/autism
Permission required. Course requires 3-5 days a week for participation in community, school, and agency programs and a weekly seminar on campus.
HBSE 4704 Observation and student teaching in special education: Applied behavioral analysis and behavioral disorders
Permission required. Course requires 3-5 days a week for participation in community, school, and agency programs and a weekly seminar on campus.
HBSE 4707 II: Observation and student teaching in special education: Deaf and hard of hearing

Permission required. Course requires 5 days a week for participation in community, school, and agency programs and a weekly seminar on campus.

HBSE 4863 Introduction to cued speech

Course provides students with a background in Cued Speech, including its history; research studies; and application of the system for deaf and hearing individuals in the classroom, home, and community. Students will learn the mechanics of the cueing system and know how to apply it as an educational and communication tool. Through an interactive approach, this course will assist teachers, administrators, consultants, interpreters and other personnel in the field of deaf and/or special education and speech-language pathology in understanding how they can apply the Cued Speech system to their respective fields.

HBSE 4871 American Sign Language I

A course designed to develop beginning receptive and expressive skills in American Sign Language.

HBSE 4872 American Sign Language II
A course designed to develop intermediate receptive and expressive skills in American Sign Language.
HBSE 4880 Opportunities and outcomes for people with disabilities

Transition planning and opportunities after K-12 school.  The course covers the planning, instruction, and organization of community-based opportunities for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and autism.  The full range of opportunities including college, employment, and increased independence to provide the supports for best outcomes for individuals with disabilities are covered in the course.

HBSE 4901 Research and independent study: Special Education
Permission required.
HBSE 5010 Study of the philosophic foundations of special education

Permission required. Required of all doctoral students in the Applied Sciences of Learning and Special Education programs in the Department of Health and Behavior Studies. Overview of major theoretical and methodological orientation within social sciences and special education.

HBSE 5301 Advanced practica in special education: Intellectual disability/autism
Guided experiences in selected special education programs for advanced students. Weekly seminar meetings. Supervised group field visits. Preservice internships arranged. Students submit reports analyzing experiences.
HBSE 5304 Advanced practica in special education: Behavioral disorders
Guided experiences in selected special education programs for advanced students. Weekly seminar meetings. Supervised group field visits. Preservice internships arranged. Students submit reports analyzing experiences.
HBSE 5307 Advanced practica in special education: Deaf and hard of hearing
Guided experiences in selected special education programs for advanced students. Weekly seminar meetings. Supervised group field visits. Preservice internships arranged. Students submit reports analyzing experiences.
HBSE 5309 Advanced practica in special education: Rehabilitation of persons with developmental disabilities
Guided experiences in selected special education programs for advanced students. Weekly seminar meetings. Supervised group field visits. Preservice internships arranged. Students submit reports analyzing experiences.
HBSE 5901 Problems in special education: Intellectual disability/autism
Qualified students work individually or in small groups under guidance on practical research problems. Proposed work must be outlined prior to registration; final written report required.
HBSE 5904 Problems in special education: Applied behavioral analysis and behavioral disorders
Qualified students work individually or in small groups under guidance on practical research problems. Proposed work must be outlined prior to registration; final written report required.
HBSE 5907 Problems in special education: Deaf and hard of hearing
Qualified students work individually or in small groups under guidance on practical research problems. Proposed work must be outlined prior to registration; final written report required.
HBSE 5909 Problems in special education: Guidance, rehabilitation, and career education
Qualified students work individually or in small groups under guidance on practical research problems. Proposed work must be outlined prior to registration; final written report required.
HBSE 6001 Research in special education

Permission required. Prerequisites: HUDM 4122 and additional statistics course work. Instruction in the development, conduct, and reporting of research. Student research studies. Required of all doctoral students in Applied Sciences of Learning and Special Education programs in the department of Health and Behavior Studies.

HBSE 6005 Research in special education: single-subject design I

Permission required. Prerequisites: HUDM 4122 and other statistics course work. Instruction in the development, conduct, and reporting of single-case design research. Student research studies. Required of all doctoral students in the Applied Sciences of Learning and Special Education programs in the department of Health and Behavior Studies.

HBSE 6008 Behaviorism and the science of behavior
Permission required (for Ph.D. students in Applied Behavior Analysis and Behavior Disorders). A survey comparing and contrasting the various behaviorisms including: methodological behaviorism, paradigmatic behaviorism, interbehaviorism, social behaviorism, radical behaviorism, behavior selection, and the relationship of these to pragmatism, natural selection, positivism, and their historical roots of behavior selection and natural selection in the Scottish enlightenment.
HBSE 6010 Advanced study of problems and issues in special education

Permission required. Required of all doctoral students in Applied Sciences of Learning and Special Education programs in the department of Health and Behavior Studies. Instruction in the current practices and policies in the education of exceptional children with emphases on language and literacy development.

HBSE 6015 The verbal behavior model: Individual educational programming

Prerequisites: HBSE 4015 and HBSE 4043. Students will master Skinner's model of communicative behavior, the associated literature, and major theoretical papers. Research and data-based schooling applications of the model will be made to pedagogy and curriculum.

HBSE 6031 Research methods in special education: single-subject design II

Permission required. Course covers inter-subject and intrasubject designs, repeated measurement, generality, direct and systematic replication, and selection of group or single-case designs.

HBSE 6401 Advanced internships in special education: Intellectual disability/autism

Permission required. Post-masters level. Intensive in-service internship at agency chosen to meet individual students needs. Students submit reports analyzing experiences.

HBSE 6501 Advanced seminars in special education: Intellectual disability/autism
For doctoral students in special education and related fields. Recent developments in theory and research as related to the specialization from psychological, educational, sociological, and/or medical sources.
HBSE 6504 Advanced seminars in special education: Applied behavior analysis and behavioral disorders
For doctoral students in special education and related fields. Recent developments in theory and research as related to the specialization from psychological, educational, sociological, and/or medical sources.
HBSE 7500 Dissertation seminar in special education

Permission required. Only advanced doctoral students in special education programs are eligible. Prerequisites: HBSE 5010, 6001, 6003, 6005, 6031 and 6010. Development of doctoral dissertations and presentation of plans for approval.

HBSE 8901 Dissertation advisement in special education: Intellectual disability/autism
Advisement on doctoral dissertations. Fee to equal 3 points at current tuition rate for each term. For requirements, see catalog on continuous registration for Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.
HBSE 8903 Dissertation advisement in special education: Physical disabilities
Advisement on doctoral dissertations. Fee to equal 3 points at current tuition rate for each term. For requirements, see catalog on continuous registration for Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.
HBSE 8904 Dissertation advisement in special education: Behavioral disorders
Advisement on doctoral dissertations. Fee to equal 3 points at current tuition rate for each term. For requirements, see catalog on continuous registration for Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.
HBSE 8907 Dissertation advisement in special education: Deaf and hard of hearing
Advisement on doctoral dissertations. Fee to equal 3 points at current tuition rate for each term. For requirements, see catalog on continuous registration for Ed.D./Ph.D. degrees.
HBSK 4072 Theory and Techniques of Assessment and Intervention in Reading

Provides an overview of theories and research pertaining to reading acquisition and assessment and intervention techniques for reading across the lifespan.  Content is organized according to four major themes: the psychology of reading development, language structures, assessment, and intervention.  Materials fee: $25.

HBSS 4116 Health Education for Teachers

This course reviews the critical health issues that affect the well-being of youths today, emphasizing the practical aspects of health education in the classroom. The course will provide training in various aspects of child health that are mandated for teaching certification, including the following: reporting child abuse; preventing school violence; and, promoting respect and dignity for all students. Students who take an online section of this course must also take an additional three-hour in-person workshop to meet the Dignity For All Students Act (DASA) requirement for teacher certification.