RESI 2022 Schedule with Descriptions

RESI 2022 Schedule with Descriptions

All times are listed in Eastern Daylight Time (UTC−04:00). Click the session title below to learn more.

 

MONDAY, JULY 11TH

Monday’s Theme: Why Reimagining?

10AM-11:45AM — Monday Morning Opening Plenary

11:45AM-12:30PM — Break/Lunch

12:30PM-1:45PM — Community Dialogue Sessions

2PM-3PM — Monday Live Workshops

3:15PM-5PM — Monday Afternoon Keynote Plenary

5:15PM-6PM — Monday After Hours Reception

TUESDAY, JULY 12TH

Tuesday’s Theme: Racial and Cultural Literacy

10AM-11:45AM — Tuesday Morning Plenary

11:45AM-12:30PM — Break/Lunch

12:30PM-1:45PM — Community Dialogue Sessions

2PM-3PM — Tuesday Live Workshops

3:15PM-5PM — Tuesday Afternoon Plenary

5:15PM-6PM — Tuesday After Hours

WEDNESDAY, JULY 13TH

Wednesday’s Theme: Equity Pedagogy

10AM-11:45AM — Wednesday Morning Plenary

11:45AM-12:30PM — Break/Lunch

12:30PM-1:45PM — Community Dialogue Sessions

2PM-3PM — Wednesday Live Workshops

3:15PM-5PM — Wednesday Afternoon Plenary

5:15PM-6PM — Wednesday After Hours

THURSDAY, JULY 14TH

Thursday’s Theme: Culturally Responsive Leadership

10AM-11:45AM — Thursday Morning Plenary

11:45AM-12:30PM — Break/Lunch

12:30PM-1:45PM — Community Dialogue Sessions

2PM-3PM — Thursday Live Workshops

3:15PM-5PM — Thursday Afternoon Plenary

5:15PM-6PM — Thursday After Hours Reception

FRIDAY, JULY 15TH (OPTIONAL)

Friday’s Theme: Reimagining Policy

10AM-11:00AM — Friday Live Workshops

11:00AM-12:30PM — Policy Roundtable

Asynchronous content available through August 1st.

 

MONDAY, JULY 11TH

Monday’s Theme: Why Reimagining?

The knowledge of our field enables us to achieve real integration and enhanced learning for all students IF we can reimagine the transformative promise of education.

 

10AM-11:45AM — Monday Morning Opening Plenary

This opening plenary will begin with a warm welcome from Teachers College’s President Tom Bailey and an overview of the week from Amy Stuart Wells and Charlyn Henderson, the RESI 2022 Executive and Associate Directors. 

 

The focus of this Plenary is to orient RESI participants to the work of addressing issues of race and education at this moment in U.S. history – Why are we Reimagining what education is and could be? How are we healing ourselves and our students to support their academic, social, and emotional development and their mental health? 

  • “Opening and Welcome” — Thomas Bailey, President of Teachers College
  • “Introduction” — Amy Stuart Wells and Charlyn Henderson, RESI Leadership
  • “Way-Making Hope Amid Hopelessness” — Jamila Lyiscott, University of Massachusetts 
  • “Our Past, Our Present, and Our Unity: Reimagining Education Anew” — RESI 2022 video production
  •  “Anchors in the Storm: Confronting Racism and Book Bans” — Ben Hodge, Patricia Jackson, Central York HS teachers
  • “Between the Lines” — EPIC Theatre

 

11:45AM-12:30PM — Break/Lunch

 

12:30PM-1:45PM — Community Dialogue Sessions

The facilitated community dialogue session is a space for participants to deepen their learning through group dialogue and individual reflection. Similar to school homeroom, participants will meet with the same group daily to explore how insights gained from workshops and plenaries will actively inform their practice in education. Participants will be encouraged to engage in critical conversations in order to challenge assumptions and spark innovation for their work moving forward. By Thursday, participants will emerge with a vision of reimagined education.

2PM-3PM — Monday Live Workshops

Workshops provide a space where participants can dive deeper into a professional development topic that relates specifically to their role in education. Workshops can be targeted towards those who are new to a topic or provide more advanced knowledge, and  they can provide practical tools, skills and strategies that participants can apply in their own classroom, school, district or community. For example, past workshops have focused on:

 

  1. Particular school subjects, such as literacy, mathematics, social studies, arts and STEM; 
  2. Levels of schooling, such as early childhood, middle grades, or high school; 
  3. Topics relevant to specific school roles such as teacher, principal, parent, central administrator, school counselor, student, and school board member; 
  4. School practices, such as student assignment, social/emotional learning, restorative justice, and assessment; and 
  5. Special groups of students, such as students with special needs, recent immigrants, emerging bilinguals, and LGBTQ students. 

 

In-person Workshops

  • “ Citizen Artists in the Classroom” — James Wallert, Lizette Padua
  • “Windows and Mirrors in the Music Room and Beyond: Curricula that Reflects and Reveals Our Students’ Cultures” — Mercedes Yvonne Lysaker
  • “Culturally Responsive Special Education Services and Trauma Informed Pedagogy” — Jocardo Edward Ralston
  • “Using school gardens to reconnect with ancestors' strengths” — Natalie Greaves-Peters, MS, RD, PhD Student, Behavioral Nutrition, Pamela Ann Koch, Ed.D., RD, Mary Swartz Rose Associate Professor of Nutrition Education

 

Virtual Synchronous Workshops

  • “Creatively Yours: Teaching Students about Trauma through Literature and the Arts” — Cheryl Gartsbeyn
  • “Underreported News Stories and journalism skills that support educators in making curricular connections to the present” — Fareed Mostoufi, Associate Director of Education at the Pulitzer Center; Donnalie Jamnah, Senior Education Manager at the Pulitzer Center

Virtual Asynchronous Workshops

  • “You Belong Here: Developing and Affirming Racial Identities in Young Children” — Tara Kirton, Doctoral Student and Early Childhood Educator
  • “Reimagining Culturally Relevant Pedagogy Amidst and Post-COVID-19” — Samantha Harrienger, Kevin Cataldo

3:15PM-5PM — Monday Afternoon Keynote Plenary

This Keynote RESI 2022 session titled “Abolitionist Teaching for Education Justice” will be delivered by award-winning author and Athletic Association Endowed Professor at the University of Georgia, Dr. Bettina L. Love.

 

5:15PM-6PM — Monday After Hours Reception

Please note: This event is open to members of the general public. This event will only be offered in-person. There is no virtual offering for this event

Join us for a reception with light refreshments following the Keynote Lecture by Dr. Bettina Love.

 

 

 

 

TUESDAY, JULY 12TH

Tuesday’s Theme: Racial and Cultural Literacy

Our goal should be to teach ourselves and our children to recognize, respond to and counter inequality related to race and certain cultural orientations.

 

10AM-11:45AM — Tuesday Morning Plenary

This Day Two Morning Plenary is focused on Racial and Cultural Literacy as a form of healing after two years of loss, fear and racial tension. Each segment is designed to support educators in fostering their own understanding of their students’ cultural backgrounds and gifts as a pathway to creating school and classroom communities filled with the love and compassion our students need to thrive academically, socially and emotionally.

 

  • “Morning Welcome and Updates ” — Charlyn Henderson, RESI Associate Director
  • “Examining Racial and Cultural Literacy through Food “ — Haeny Yoon and Tran Templeton, Teachers College
  • “Reimagining Technology as a Tool for Racial Literacy” — Detra Price-Dennis, Teachers College Faculty,  Noelle Mapes and Emily Smith, NYC Public Schools

 

11:45AM-12:30PM — Break/Lunch

 

12:30PM-1:45PM — Community Dialogue Sessions

The facilitated community dialogue session is a space for participants to deepen their learning through group dialogue and individual reflection. Similar to school homeroom, participants will meet with the same group daily to explore how insights gained from workshops and plenaries will actively inform their practice in education. Participants will be encouraged to engage in critical conversations in order to challenge assumptions and spark innovation for their work moving forward. By Thursday, participants will emerge with a vision of reimagined education.

 

2PM-3PM — Tuesday Live Workshops

Workshops provide a space where participants can dive deeper into a professional development topic that relates specifically to their role in education. Workshops can be targeted towards those who are new to a topic or provide more advanced knowledge, and  they can provide practical tools, skills and strategies that participants can apply in their own classroom, school, district or community. For example, past workshops have focused on:

 

  1. Particular school subjects, such as literacy, mathematics, social studies, arts and STEM; 
  2. Levels of schooling, such as early childhood, middle grades, or high school; 
  3. Topics relevant to specific school roles such as teacher, principal, parent, central administrator, school counselor, student, and school board member; 
  4. School practices, such as student assignment, social/emotional learning, restorative justice, and assessment; and 
  5. Special groups of students, such as students with special needs, recent immigrants, emerging bilinguals, and LGBTQ students. 

 

In-person Workshops

  • “Teaching Justice through Multimodal Modules” — Patricia (Patty) Pión, Farah Amanda Bobbitt, Sandy Earl
  • “What's Your Story? (a youth-led workshop) Promoting Racial/Cultural Awareness Through the Power of Storytelling” — Heather Case; Toushi Karim, Sidharth Mahadeo, Mariam Coulibaly
  • “How to Develop a Meaningful Youth-Adult Restorative Practices & Equity Team (RPET) at YOUR School” — Ari Sussman, Sophia Webster, Fatoumata Tunkara, Vanessa Aguayo

 

Virtual Synchronous Workshops

  • “Teaching Black Feminism in the English Classroom” — Ileana Jiménez
  • “Mirror, Mirror: Humanizing Pedagogies through Self-Work” — Tasha Austin PhD
  • “#justlit: Strategies for Fostering Racial Literacy in K-6” — Noelle Mapes, Dr. Jenice Mateo-Toledo, Rachel Knight, Katie Harlan Eller

 

Virtual Asynchronous Workshops

  • “Reimagining Intervention: Student Testimonies from k-12 Culturally Responsive Classrooms Serving At-Risk Immigrant Youth; Disrupting Forced Assimilation Curriculum Models and ‘Us versus Them Mindset’” — Susan Capote Lamb MS., EdD (in progress); Hetty King BFA, MFA, MA, CMA
  • “‘Our Lives Matter’: Reimagining Curriculum Design and Building Transformative Pedagogies through Youth Literacies, Identities, and Knowledge” — Mijin Yeom, Gloria Tsang, Jordon Comrie, Marissa Desir, Jonathan Lam

 

3:15PM-5PM — Tuesday Afternoon Plenary

This session begins with an emphasis on the importance of teacher well-being as a way to help teachers support their students to create Healing Schools. The second segment is filled with the voices of students and youth and their adult allies who seek to share the power of artistic expression as a form of racial and cultural literacy for their students. Such artistic expression – applied to any subject – will foster healing from the trauma of the past two years and self-esteem and greater engagement in academic subjects, especially for students who have lost the most instructional time amid the pandemic. 

 

  • Dialogue Session Between Bettina Love and Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz  
  • “Together: Intergenerational Inquiry for Critical and Culturally Responsive/Sustaining Pedagogy” — Limarys Caraballo, TC Professor, Karen Zaino, “Cyphers for Justice”- Doctoral Lecturer, Mijin Yeom, CFJ program coordinator, Mark Narvaez and Caroline Park, Teachers, Joshua Aranay, Jonathan Lam, Anisa Nazir, CFJ Youth

 

5:15PM-6PM — Tuesday After Hours

Optional after-hours programming featuring some of the most critical and provocative conversations in education.

 

 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 13TH

Wednesday’s Theme: Equity Pedagogy

We must embrace teaching strategies that foster racial and cultural literacies to support all students in reaching their highest potential while sustaining a just, humane and democratic society.

 

10AM-11:45AM — Wednesday Morning Plenary

This Day Three Morning Plenary offers educators with specific, tangible strategies for making the curriculum and pedagogy of schools more culturally relevant and sustaining. The three segments of this session provide examples of distinct, but related projects to reimagine education as we know it.  Several related workshops will give participants hands-on materials to take home for the fall.

 

  • “Morning Welcome and Updates ” — Charlyn Henderson, RESI Associate Director
  • “Discrit and Anti-racist Education: Why Reimagine Education and Special Education” — Subini Ancy Annamma, Stanford, and Srikala “Kala” Naraian, Teachers College
  • “New York City Civil RIghts History Project: Race, Disability, and Activism in the Curriculum” — Ansley Erickson, Associate Professor, History and Education Policy, Nelson Luna, Youth Fellow, Harlem Education History Project and Center on History and Education, Teachers College, Jessica Murray, Lead Researcher and Developer, New York City Civil Rights History Project, Errol C. Saunders II, Doctoral Student, Department of Curriculum and Teaching, Teachers College, Maria Guarino, Educator, Francine Almash, PhD Candidate in Urban Education, The Graduate Center, CUNY
  • “Collaborative Curriculum Project” — Ansley Erickson , Teachers College
  • “Listening Project ” [Final Title TBA]  — Joseph Nelson, Swarthmore College and Teachers College 

 

11:45AM-12:30PM — Break/Lunch

 

12:30PM-1:45PM — Community Dialogue Sessions

The facilitated community dialogue session is a space for participants to deepen their learning through group dialogue and individual reflection. Similar to school homeroom, participants will meet with the same group daily to explore how insights gained from workshops and plenaries will actively inform their practice in education. Participants will be encouraged to engage in critical conversations in order to challenge assumptions and spark innovation for their work moving forward. By Thursday, participants will emerge with a vision of reimagined education.

2PM-3PM — Wednesday Live Workshops

Workshops provide a space where participants can dive deeper into a professional development topic that relates specifically to their role in education. Workshops can be targeted towards those who are new to a topic or provide more advanced knowledge, and  they can provide practical tools, skills and strategies that participants can apply in their own classroom, school, district or community. For example, past workshops have focused on:

 

  1. Particular school subjects, such as literacy, mathematics, social studies, arts and STEM; 
  2. Levels of schooling, such as early childhood, middle grades, or high school; 
  3. Topics relevant to specific school roles such as teacher, principal, parent, central administrator, school counselor, student, and school board member; 
  4. School practices, such as student assignment, social/emotional learning, restorative justice, and assessment; and 
  5. Special groups of students, such as students with special needs, recent immigrants, emerging bilinguals, and LGBTQ students. 

 

In-person Workshops

  • “Creation of the Nation” — Amoy Gill; Dalissa Duran
  • “Centering identity: Supporting student aspirations with a re-imagined SEL framework” — Maria Alejandra Canales- Managing Director Program Implementation, Suzanne Wulach- Director of Evaluation
  • “Reimagining the Rug: Elementary Read Aloud as a Space for Honoring Identity and Cultivating Unity” — Madeline Dressner, Abby C. Emerson
  • “Reimagining Integration: A Pedagogy of Disability as Transformative Praxis” — Miranda Hansen-Hunt, Maria Guarino, Francine Almash
  • “Joyful Struggle - Teaching Education Protest in NYC” — Ansley T. Erickson, Errol C. Saunders, II

 

Virtual Synchronous Workshops

  • “Radical Healing in the Youth Poetry Slam: Lessons from a Hip-Hop and Spoken Word Learning Community” — Brian Mooney
  • “Moving Toward Action and Agency: Facilitating Inclusive Social and Emotional Dynamics in the Classroom” — Josh Friedman
  • “Designing Equitable Learning Environments For All: the Role of Technology, Projects, and Inquiry-Based Learning” — Karen Kirsch Page, Ellen B. Meier, Caron Mineo, Bianca Licata, Jacqueline Pilati, Yvonne Thevenot, Hilary Ferguson, Anusheh Hashim Byrne

 

Virtual Asynchronous Workshops

  • “Opening the Doors of Literacy: Cultivating Equitable School Communities at the Primary Level” — Sarah Armstrong

3:15PM-5PM — Wednesday Afternoon Plenary

This plenary features TC professor Christopher Emdin sharing the key takeaways from his newly published book, Ratchetdemic: Reimagining Academic Success. The book provides educators a revolutionary new educational model that helps students (and teachers) celebrate “ratchet” (negative labels for characteristics of many students from low-income families and students of color) identities rarely accepted in the classroom. Emdin’s presentation is followed by a powerful “talk back” between him and two youth from Big Picture Learning, which is a non-profit organization that works with educators to enact a vision that all students can live lives of their own design, supported by caring mentors, student-directed learning, and equitable opportunities to achieve their greatest potential. This plenary will help educators see the power of providing spaces for students to display their academic brilliance without sacrificing their identities. 

 

  • “STEM Stories: A Culturally Responsive Approach to STEM Learning ” — Erica Walker and Charlyn Henderson, Teachers College and Jazlyn Mena, Castle Bridge Elementary, and Bernadette Napoleon, P.S. 116 
  • Title Forthcoming — Christopher  Emdin, USC

 

5:15PM-6PM — Wednesday After Hours

Optional after-hours programming featuring some of the most critical and provocative conversations in education.

 

 

THURSDAY, JULY 14TH

Thursday’s Theme: Culturally Responsive Leadership

21st century educational leaders must value the multiple understandings of racially, ethnically and culturally diverse learners, including those not measured on standardized tests.

 

10AM-11:45AM — Thursday Morning Plenary

Culturally responsive leadership empowers education leaders to use cultural references to support teacher-, school-, district-, leadership in creating conditions to enhance the student learning experience. This plenary provides an opportunity for attendees to consider teacher, school and district-level leadership within the context of a “post pandemic” moment. In conversation, panel members collectively explore: the ongoing disproportionate impact of race inequities; the inherent challenges in fully supporting racially, ethnically, and culturally diverse learners across the PK-12 education system at classroom, school and district level; strategies to counter the negative myths and misinformation that seeks to devalue the learning experience in classrooms; schools and districts serving students and communities from racialized backgrounds. Panelists will also share examples and strategies for success of culturally responsive leadership, evidenced through action-oriented social justice leadership, community engagement, intentional implementation of cultural competency, and addressing unconscious racial bias in schools.

 

  • “Morning Welcome and Updates ” — Charlyn Henderson, RESI Associate Director: 
  • “Are you Ready to Lead & Teach the Change You Want to See?: What We Can’t Do; But What We Did.” — Felicia  Moore Mensah, TC: Teacher Leadership
  • “A Reflection on Year 1 of the The 1619 Project Education Network: Leadership to Respond to the Needs of Our Teachers” — Fareed Mostoufi, and Donnalie Jamnah,  Pulitzer Center, Hannah Nolan-Spohn, English Language Support Educator, Maya Wilson, High School Educator

 

11:45AM-12:30PM — Break/Lunch

 

12:30PM-1:45PM — Community Dialogue Sessions

The facilitated community dialogue session is a space for participants to deepen their learning through group dialogue and individual reflection. Similar to school homeroom, participants will meet with the same group daily to explore how insights gained from workshops and plenaries will actively inform their practice in education. Participants will be encouraged to engage in critical conversations in order to challenge assumptions and spark innovation for their work moving forward. By Thursday, participants will emerge with a vision of reimagined education.

 

2PM-3PM — Thursday Live Workshops

Workshops provide a space where participants can dive deeper into a professional development topic that relates specifically to their role in education. Workshops can be targeted towards those who are new to a topic or provide more advanced knowledge, and  they can provide practical tools, skills and strategies that participants can apply in their own classroom, school, district or community. For example, past workshops have focused on:

 

  1. Particular school subjects, such as literacy, mathematics, social studies, arts and STEM; 
  2. Levels of schooling, such as early childhood, middle grades, or high school; 
  3. Topics relevant to specific school roles such as teacher, principal, parent, central administrator, school counselor, student, and school board member; 
  4. School practices, such as student assignment, social/emotional learning, restorative justice, and assessment; and 
  5. Special groups of students, such as students with special needs, recent immigrants, emerging bilinguals, and LGBTQ students. 

 

In-person Workshops

  • “From Passion to Action: Supporting Student Leadership and Activism” — Elaine Gross, MSW, Derrielle Faulkner, Alli Alvarez, Cateyann Bernard, Maekyla Massey, Savanna Pineros, Yoav Muscal
  • “Antiracist Leadership: Navigating the boundaries at the nexus between policy and practice to lead for equity.” — Jill Bloomberg
  • “Using Journalism and Research to Develop Intentional Curriculum” — Fareed Mostoufi, Associate Director of Education at the Pulitzer Center, Donnalie Jamnah, Senior Education Manager at the Pulitzer Center, Christine Fryer, High School Social Studies Educator and alumnus of The 1619 Project Education Network, Jane Lawrence, Visual arts educator and Pulitzer Center Teacher Fellow, Tania Mohammed, English Language Arts educator and Pulitzer Center Teacher Fellow
  • “Racial Identity and the Therapeutic Relationship: Art as the Language of Identity, Leadership and Practice” — Kaena Clark

 

Virtual Synchronous Workshops

  • “Building Educators’ Racial Literacy: Considerations for Bringing Race-based Conversations Into Your School Building’s PD” — Abby C. Emerson
  • “Realizing the Solidarity Dividend: A new story for educational leadership” — Dr. Allison Roda, Florence Barbour, Kelly Bare
  • “A Partnership Model to Increase Young Men of Color College Completion Rates” — Alberto Morales, Founder & CEO, Morales Consulting, Derrick M. Fleming, Jr, Managing Director of Strategic Engagement, Chicago Scholars, Hannaan Joplin, Senior Regional Manager, Becoming A Man, Youth Guidance
  • “What We Can’t Do; But What We Did” — Felicia Moore Mensah, Ph.D., Victoria Smith, Patricia Hans
  • “Cripping the History Curriculum: Teaching to Fill the Archival Silences” — Miranda Hansen-Hunt, Maria Guarino, Francine Almash
  • “Leveraging Youth-Led Digital Literacies: Implications from Justice-Centered Teacher Action Research” — Karen Zaino, Caroline Ahn-Park, Amelia Ward
  • “Listening with our Hearts and Hands” — Kandice Stewart

 

Virtual Asynchronous Workshops

  • “A New Stance: Cultural Liberation Pedagogy (CLP)” — Kevin Cataldo

 

3:15PM-5PM — Thursday Afternoon Plenary

This session will feature youth leadership on issues of suburban school district segregation and the need for students to lead the change they want to see within and across their separate and unequal school districts on Long Island. These secondary school students push for change on multiple fronts, from changing their school curriculum to organizing clubs with other students to share concerns and advocate for changes. Following these high school students will be a deep discussion of what is in store for high school students when they matriculate into higher education in the U.S. and what “diversity work” on college campuses can and should look like to support an anti-racist agenda.

 

  • Title Forthcoming — York, PA Students and educators ; Olivia (Train); Ed Gupta, Mother, Father, Renee, Christina & Mario
  • Title Forthcoming — Erase Racism and the LI Student Task Force Panel 
  • Combined Q and A and Wrap up of the for-credit Institute

 

5:15PM-6PM — Thursday After Hours 

Optional after-hours programming featuring some of the most critical and provocative conversations in education.

 

 

FRIDAY, JULY 15TH (OPTIONAL)

Friday’s Theme: Reimagining Policy

This summer, as educators come together to heal and reboot, the Reimagining Education Summer Institute (RESI) is leveraging their knowledge base on good teaching and best practices for a racially and ethnically diverse democracy into the policy space in a special virtual session titled “Reimagining Policy: A Roundtable with Policymakers, Students, Educators, and Communities.” At this event, there will be a critical policy dialogue between educators, students, researchers and policymakers who care deeply about issues of race and education. Educators, students and researchers will share their perspectives on the policy barriers they face when trying to enact anti-racist education strategies, while policymakers will discuss the work they are doing to address these policy barriers and support policies that allow for transformative, anti-racist education reform.

 

10AM-11AM — Friday Live Workshops (Virtual Only)

Workshops provide a space where participants can dive deeper into a professional development topic that relates specifically to their role in education. Workshops can be targeted towards those who are new to a topic or provide more advanced knowledge, and  they can provide practical tools, skills and strategies that participants can apply in their own classroom, school, district or community. For example, past workshops have focused on:

 

  1. Particular school subjects, such as literacy, mathematics, social studies, arts and STEM; 
  2. Levels of schooling, such as early childhood, middle grades, or high school; 
  3. Topics relevant to specific school roles such as teacher, principal, parent, central administrator, school counselor, student, and school board member; 
  4. School practices, such as student assignment, social/emotional learning, restorative justice, and assessment; and 
  5. Special groups of students, such as students with special needs, recent immigrants, emerging bilinguals, and LGBTQ students. 

 

11AM-12:30PM — Policy Roundtable

This summer, as educators come together to heal and reboot, the Reimagining Education Summer Institute (RESI) is leveraging their knowledge base on good teaching and best practices for a racially and ethnically diverse democracy into the policy space in a special virtual session titled “Reimagining Policy: A Roundtable with Policymakers, Students, Educators, and Communities.” At this event, there will be a critical policy dialogue between educators, students, researchers and policymakers who care deeply about issues of race and education. Educators, students and researchers will share their perspectives on the policy barriers they face when trying to enact anti-racist education strategies, while policymakers will discuss the work they are doing to address these policy barriers and support policies that allow for transformative, anti-racist education reform.

 

Asynchronous content available through August 1st.



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