Chase, Catherine C. (cc3663)

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Chase, Catherine
Assistant Professor of Cognitive Studies
Department of Human Development
212-678-3483

Office:
460 GDodge

Office Hours:
by appointment; please email

Educational Background

Ph.D. Learning Sciences and Technology Design.  Stanford University, 2011.

M.S. Elementary Education.  Brooklyn College, City University of New York, 2003.

B.A.S. Biology and Psychology, with honors. Stanford University, 2000.

Scholarly Interests

  • Cognition, learning, and transfer in STEM domains
  • Student motivation and its relationship to instructional methods and learning outcomes
  • The design of novel instructional methods that teach deep domain principles
  • Technology-based classroom interventions such as educational games, simulations, intelligent tutoring systems, and Teachable Agents

Selected Publications

Chase, C.C., Malkiewich, L.M.*, Lee, A.*, Slater, S.*, Choi, A., & Xing, C.* (under review). Game over: When a game hurts learning and challenge-seeking. IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies.

Lamnina, M.* & Chase, C.C. (under review). Finding the right level of uncertainty in instruction: Effects on curiosity, learning, and transfer.

Chase, C.C., Harpstead, E., & Aleven, V. (under review/revision). Promoting transfer beyond the game: Adapting contrasting cases for educational games. Journal of the Learning Sciences.

Marks, J.* & Chase, C. C. (in press). The impact of a brief design thinking intervention on students’ design knowledge, iterative dispositions, and attitudes towards failure. Journal of Engineering Education.

Malkiewich, L.M.*, & Chase, C.C. (in press). What’s your goal? The importance of shaping the goals of engineering tasks to focus learners on the underlying science. Instructional Science.

Lamnina, M.*, & Chase, C.C. (in press). Developing a thirst for knowledge: How uncertainty in the classroom influences curiosity, affect, learning, and transfer. Contemporary Educational Psychology.

Chase, C.C., Marks, J.*, Malkiewich, L.M.*, & Connolly, H* (2019). How teacher talk guidance during Invention activities shapes students’ cognitive engagement and transfer. International Journal of STEM Education, 6(14), 1-22. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40594-019-0170-7

Chase, C.C., Connolly, H.*, Lamnina, M.*, & Aleven, V. (2019). Problematizing helps! A classroom study of a computer-based guidance for Invention activities. International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education, 29(2), 283-316. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40593-019-00178-y

Malkiewich, L.M.*, & Chase, C.C. (2019). The process of focusing on deep structures in an engineering design task. International Journal of Science Education, 1-21. https://doi.org/10.1080/09500693.2019.1613583

Chase, C.C., Malkiewich, L.M.*, & Kumar, A.* (2019). Learning to notice science concepts in engineering activities and transfer situations. Science Education, 103(2), 440-471. https://doi.org/10.1002/sce.21496

Fusco, J. Martin, W. Lane, H. C. & Chase, C.C. (2017). Virtual peers and coaches: Social and cognitive support for learning. In J. Roschelle, W. Martin, J. Ahn, & P. Schank (Eds.), Cyberlearning Community Report: The State of Cyberlearning and the Future of Learning With Technology (pp. 31-35). Menlo Park CA: SRI International.

Chase, C.C., & Klahr, D. (2017). Invention versus direct instruction: In some contexts it’s a tie. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 26(6), 582-596. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10956-017-9700-6

Marks, J.*, Bernett, D.*, & Chase, C.C. (2016). The Invention Coach: Integrating data and theory in the design of an exploratory learning environment. International Journal of Designs for Learning, 7(2), 74-92. https://doi.org/10.14434/ijdl.v7i2.20126

Shemwell, J.T., Chase, C.C., & Schwartz, D.L. (2015). Seeking the general explanation: A test of inductive activities for learning and transfer. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 52(1), 58-83. https://doi.org/10.1002/tea.21185

Chase, C.C. (2013). Motivating expertise: Equipping novices with the motivational tools to move beyond failure.  In J.J. Staszewski (Ed.), Expertise and skill acquisition: The impact of William G. Chase (pp. 59-83).  New York: Psychology Press. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203074541 

Chi, M.T.H., Roscoe, R., Slotta, J., Roy, M. & Chase, C.C. (2012). Misconceived causal explanations for emergent processes. Cognitive Science, 36(1), 1-61. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1551-6709.2011.01207.x

Schwartz, D.L., Chase, C.C., & Bransford, J.D. (2012). Resisting overzealous transfer: Coordinating previous successful routines with needs for new learning. Educational Psychologist, 47(3), 204-214. https://doi.org/10.1080/00461520.2012.696317 

Schwartz, D.L., Chase, C.C., Oppezzo, M.A., & Chin, D.B. (2011). Practicing versus inventing with contrasting cases: The effects of telling first on learning and transfer. Journal of Educational Psychology, 103(4), 759-775. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0025140 

Chin, D.B., Dohmen, I.M., Cheng, B.H., Oppezzo, M.A., Chase, C.C., & Schwartz, D.L. (2010).   Preparing students for future learning with Teachable Agents. Educational Technology Research and Development, 58(6), 649-669. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11423-010-9154-5 

Chase, C.C., Chin, D.B., Oppezzo, M.A., & Schwartz, D.L. (2009). Teachable Agents and the Protégé Effect: Increasing the effort towards learning. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 18(4), 334-352. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10956-009-9180-4 

Schwartz D.L., Chase C.C., Chin D.B., Oppezzo M.A., Kwong H., Okita S., Biswas G., Roscoe R.D., Jeong H., & Wagster J.D. (2009). Interactive metacognition: Monitoring and regulating a teachable agent. In D.J. Hacker, J. Dunlosky, & A.C. Graesser (Eds.), Handbook of metacognition in education (pp. 340-358). New York: Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203876428 


Copies of most publications can be found at catherinechase.org/publications/

Chase, C.C., Malkiewich, L.M.*, Lee, A.*, Slater, S.*, Choi, A., & Xing, C.* (under review). Game over: When a game hurts learning and challenge-seeking. IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies.

Lamnina, M.* & Chase, C.C. (under review). Finding the right level of uncertainty in instruction: Effects on curiosity, learning, and transfer.

Chase, C.C., Harpstead, E., & Aleven, V. (under review/revision). Promoting transfer beyond the game: Adapting contrasting cases for educational games. Journal of the Learning Sciences.

Marks, J.* & Chase, C. C. (in press). The impact of a brief design thinking intervention on students’ design knowledge, iterative dispositions, and attitudes towards failure. Journal of Engineering Education.

Malkiewich, L.M.*, & Chase, C.C. (in press). What’s your goal? The importance of shaping the goals of engineering tasks to focus learners on the underlying science. Instructional Science.

Lamnina, M.*, & Chase, C.C. (in press). Developing a thirst for knowledge: How uncertainty in the classroom influences curiosity, affect, learning, and transfer. Contemporary Educational Psychology.

Chase, C.C., Marks, J.*, Malkiewich, L.M.*, & Connolly, H* (2019). How teacher talk guidance during Invention activities shapes students’ cognitive engagement and transfer. International Journal of STEM Education, 6(14), 1-22. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40594-019-0170-7

Chase, C.C., Connolly, H.*, Lamnina, M.*, & Aleven, V. (2019). Problematizing helps! A classroom study of a computer-based guidance for Invention activities. International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education, 29(2), 283-316. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40593-019-00178-y

Malkiewich, L.M.*, & Chase, C.C. (2019). The process of focusing on deep structures in an engineering design task. International Journal of Science Education, 1-21. https://doi.org/10.1080/09500693.2019.1613583

Chase, C.C., Malkiewich, L.M.*, & Kumar, A.* (2019). Learning to notice science concepts in engineering activities and transfer situations. Science Education, 103(2), 440-471. https://doi.org/10.1002/sce.21496

Fusco, J. Martin, W. Lane, H. C. & Chase, C.C. (2017). Virtual peers and coaches: Social and cognitive support for learning. In J. Roschelle, W. Martin, J. Ahn, & P. Schank (Eds.), Cyberlearning Community Report: The State of Cyberlearning and the Future of Learning With Technology (pp. 31-35). Menlo Park CA: SRI International.

Chase, C.C., & Klahr, D. (2017). Invention versus direct instruction: In some contexts it’s a tie. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 26(6), 582-596. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10956-017-9700-6

Marks, J.*, Bernett, D.*, & Chase, C.C. (2016). The Invention Coach: Integrating data and theory in the design of an exploratory learning environment. International Journal of Designs for Learning, 7(2), 74-92. https://doi.org/10.14434/ijdl.v7i2.20126

Shemwell, J.T., Chase, C.C., & Schwartz, D.L. (2015). Seeking the general explanation: A test of inductive activities for learning and transfer. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 52(1), 58-83. https://doi.org/10.1002/tea.21185

Chase, C.C. (2013). Motivating expertise: Equipping novices with the motivational tools to move beyond failure.  In J.J. Staszewski (Ed.), Expertise and skill acquisition: The impact of William G. Chase (pp. 59-83).  New York: Psychology Press. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203074541 

Chi, M.T.H., Roscoe, R., Slotta, J., Roy, M. & Chase, C.C. (2012). Misconceived causal explanations for emergent processes. Cognitive Science, 36(1), 1-61. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1551-6709.2011.01207.x

Schwartz, D.L., Chase, C.C., & Bransford, J.D. (2012). Resisting overzealous transfer: Coordinating previous successful routines with needs for new learning. Educational Psychologist, 47(3), 204-214. https://doi.org/10.1080/00461520.2012.696317 

Schwartz, D.L., Chase, C.C., Oppezzo, M.A., & Chin, D.B. (2011). Practicing versus inventing with contrasting cases: The effects of telling first on learning and transfer. Journal of Educational Psychology, 103(4), 759-775. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0025140 

Chin, D.B., Dohmen, I.M., Cheng, B.H., Oppezzo, M.A., Chase, C.C., & Schwartz, D.L. (2010).   Preparing students for future learning with Teachable Agents. Educational Technology Research and Development, 58(6), 649-669. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11423-010-9154-5 

Chase, C.C., Chin, D.B., Oppezzo, M.A., & Schwartz, D.L. (2009). Teachable Agents and the Protégé Effect: Increasing the effort towards learning. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 18(4), 334-352. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10956-009-9180-4 

Schwartz D.L., Chase C.C., Chin D.B., Oppezzo M.A., Kwong H., Okita S., Biswas G., Roscoe R.D., Jeong H., & Wagster J.D. (2009). Interactive metacognition: Monitoring and regulating a teachable agent. In D.J. Hacker, J. Dunlosky, & A.C. Graesser (Eds.), Handbook of metacognition in education (pp. 340-358). New York: Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203876428 


Copies of most publications can be found at catherinechase.org/publications/

HUDK 4080: Educational Psychology -- teaching in Summer B 2019, and Fall 2019

HUDK 4029: Cognition and Learning

HUDK 5505: Transfer of Learning -- teaching in Fall, 2019

HUDK 6199: Learning through Play

HUDK 5324/6539: Research Practicum -- teaching in Spring, 2020

New Course! Learning Science Principles -- teaching in Spring, 2020

Courses

Related Articles

The Invention Coach

An interview with Catherine Chase, Assistant Professor of Human Development at Teachers College, Columbia University. Dr. Chase studies how exploratory learning activities impact student learning, transfer, and motivation, largely in the context of STEM education.

/faculty/cc3663/faculty-profile/external-articles/
/articles/2019/march/the-importance-of-deeper-noticing/
/articles/2018/september/interactive-learning-via-the-subway/

The Invention Coach

An interview with Catherine Chase, Assistant Professor of Human Development at Teachers College, Columbia University. Dr. Chase studies how exploratory learning activities impact student learning, transfer, and motivation, largely in the context of STEM education.

/faculty/cc3663/faculty-profile/external-articles/