Assistant Director

Assistant Director


Bryan Cheng
Assistant Director, Ph.D.

Dr. Bryan Cheng is the Assistant Director of the Global Mental Health Lab at Columbia University. He received his B.S. in Developmental Psychology from the University of Minnesota in the Twin Cities, and his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Teachers College, Columbia University. He completed his doctoral internship at Mount Sinai St. Luke's and West Hospitals focusing his clinical training on the care for individuals suffering from psychotic disorders, where he now also lectures and supervises interns and psychiatric residents on CBT and IPT. Dr. Cheng provides oversight on various projects in the lab, including an RCUK funded Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) scalability for Syrian refugees in Lebanon. He is also a co-investigator (methodologist and statistician) for a large clustered randomized controlled trial in northern Uganda investigating the effects of the treatment of maternal depression using IPT on child nutrition outcomes and growth, and a similar project investigating the effects of maternal depression on food security in Ethiopia. He also currently co-chairs an international collaborative focused on elevating the linkages between nutrition and mental health with researchers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (U.K.), Kings College London (U.K.), Northwestern University (U.S.), University of Chittagong (Bangladesh), and Kabale University (Uganda). His previous research includes an assessment of the needs of Syrian refugees in Jordan and validation of mental healthcare instruments for that population, as well as utilization of new statistical methodology to investigate trends and trajectories in mental health outcomes in large clinical epidemiological data. He is also an IPT provider and supervisor, and specializes in other forms of therapies including Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT). As he pursues expanding his research in global mental health research, his interests continue to include the role of rumination in maternal depression, the economics of mental health interventions in health systems, and the development and cultural validation of mental health measures.

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