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The Language and Social Interaction Working Group (LANSI)

Stance Analysis in Sociolinguistics (Friday, December 18, 2020)

Scott Kiesling

University of Pittsburgh

 

Abstract

While stance (aka stancetaking) has been used as an explanatory notion in sociolinguistics for some time, there is nevertheless often confusion about what stance is and more importantly how to go about using it in an analysis. I present both a way of thinking about stance and some models for analyzing it. The model expands on Jack Du Bois's (2007) notion of the stance triangle, and expands upon the insights there while drawing on insights of Jakobson (1957), Goffman (1981), and Kockelman (2004). I demonstrate the use of the model and method for analyses of discourse markers as well as gender and sexuality. 

 

References

Du Bois, John. 2007. The Stance Triangle. In R. Englebretson (Ed.), Stancetaking in Discourse (pp. 139–182). John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Goffman, Erving. 1981. Footing. In E. Goffman, Forms of Talk, 124-159. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Jakobson, Roman. 1957. Shifters and verbal categories. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, Dept. of Slavic Languages and Literatures. Reprinted in L. R. Waugh & M. Monville-Burston (Eds.), [1990] On language: Roman Jakobson, 386–392. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Kockelman, P. 2004. Stance and subjectivity. Journal of Linguistic Anthropology 14, 127–150. doi:10.1525/jlin.2004.14.2.127

 

Speaker's Bio

Scott Kiesling is Professor and Chair of Linguistics at the University of Pittsburgh. He is a sociolinguist who works in both variation and discourse analytic methods, with a focus on gender/sexual identities, masculinities, class and place in Pittsburgh, ethnic identities in Australia, and theories of affect and stance(taking) in sociolinguistics. 

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