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PART I: Key issues and concerns in school reform and school change
Week 1 - September 2: Why change? Why not?  

Overview of the course and key issues in school change. Participants will be introduced to the debates around whether or not schools have improved.

Printable Syllabus (word)

Designs for New Schools

Week 2 - September 8: What's involved in change?
The nature of change and the complexity of the “change process”

Required:

  • Fullan, M. (2006). “Change” In Turnaround leadership. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 35-68.
  • Senge, P. (1990). “The art of seeing the forest and the trees.” In The Fifth discipline. New York: Doubleday, 127-135.
  • Hatch, T. (in press). “For better and for worse: Creating good schools in difficult times.” Chapter 2 from Managing to change:  How schools can survive (and sometimes thrive) in turbulent times. New York: Teachers College Press.

Recommended:

  • Hatch, T. (2009).  “It takes capacity to build capacity” and “Changing conditions, changing times.”Chapters 1 & 2 from Managing to change:  How schools can survive (and sometimes thrive) in turbulent times.  New York:  Teachers College Press.

Due in class: 2-3 page letters

Resources on Change

Week 3 - September 15: What has changed? What hasn't?
A brief history of key events and issues in school reform: "Incremental" vs. "radical" change; how reforms change schools and schools change reforms; predictable failures; and the grammar of schooling.

Required:

  • Tyack, D. & Cuban, L. (1995). Tinkering toward utopia: A Century of public school reform. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Chpts 1-4.

Due in class: Brief reflection on how Tyack and Cuban explain why some changes endured while others did not.

History Resources

Week 4 - September 22: What should change?
An examination of the theories and assumptions behind school reform efforts.

Required:

  • Hatch, T. (1998). “The differences in theory that matter in the practice of school improvement,” American Journal of Education 35 : 3-31.
  • Cohen, D. K., & Moffit, S. (2009).  “Title 1” & “Epilogue” (pp. 179-231) in The ordeal of equality: Did federal regulation fix the schools? Cambridge, MA:  Harvard University Press.

Recommended:

Due in class: 1 page description of a reform effort to serve as the basis for the reform critique

Background Resources

Week 5 - September 29:  How can schools change?   
            An exploration of the theories behind a variety of approaches that seek to redesign schools and/or learning (such as Core Knowledge, Expeditionary Learning Outward Bound, KIPP, or the Big Picture Company)

            Required:

  • Websites and selected program documents and evaluation reports from one of the school designs.

Recommended:

Due in class:  Bring a brief (1-2 paragraph) description of your initial view of the theory of action underlying key aspects of one of the designs.

 

School Designs

Week 6 - October 6: Why don’t schools change? The perils and the promise of school reform.
A consideration of the key problems with current reform efforts.

Required:

  • Cohen, David (1990). “A Revolution in one classroom: The Case of Mrs. Oublier.” Educational Evaluation Policy Analysis, 12.
  • Elmore, R. (2003). “Change and improvement in education.” In David Gordon (Ed.). A Nation reformed? Cambridge: Harvard Education Press.
  • Payne, C. (2008).  “I don't want your nasty pot of gold From social demoralization to organizational irrationality” In  So much reform, so little change.  Cambridge, MA:  Harvard University Press.

Recommended:

  • Evans, R. (1996). “Reach and realism, experience and hope.” In The Human side of school change. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, p. 289-299.

Due: Lists of group members for school design project

Centers for Research and Evaluation

Center on Education Policy
PART II: How can we design new schools?

Week 7 - October 13:  What can new schools look like?
Initial discussion of new school designs and the school design process.

Required: 

Due: 4-5 page reform critiques

 

Week 8 - October 20: What goes into a school design?.
A review of some of the key aspects of school design and their connections.

Required: 

  • Darling-Hammond, L. (1997).  “Structuring learner-centered schools” and “Staffing schools for teaching and learning.”  In The Right to learn. San Francisco:  Jossey-Bass, 148-210.
  • Hatch, T. (2009).  “Key practices for managing change.”  Introduction to Part II  in Managing to change:  How schools can survive (and sometimes thrive) in turbulent times.  New York:  Teachers College Press.

Resources for designing charter schools and small schools

New Visions school design resources

Resources for Budgeting:

Week 9 - October 27: Purpose, Community, & Culture
Why have a school? What purpose does it serve?  Who does it serve? Who is your community? What kind of school culture(s) reflect your purpose?

Required:

  • Meier, D. (1999). “Habits of mind: Democratic values and the creation of effective learning communities” in Common schools, uncommon futures: A working consensus for school renewal.  New York:  Teachers College Press.
  • Hatch, T. (2009). “Developing common purposes and shared understanding.” Chapter 3 in Managing to change:  How schools can survive (and sometimes thrive) in turbulent times. New York:  Teachers College Press.
  • Evans, R.  (2001) “The Culture of Resistance.” In L. Iura (Ed.), The Jossey-Bass Reader on School Reform.  San Francisco: Jossey-Bass

Week 10 - November 3: Purpose, community, & culture (Cont.)

Required:

  • Hatch, T. (1998).  How community action contributes to achievement. Educational Leadership, 55 (8), 16-19.
  • Berger, R.  “The radon project.”  In A Culture of quality.  Providence, RI.  Annenberg Institute for School Reform, 13-51.
  • Warren, M. (2005) Communities and schools: A new view of urban education reform. Harvard Educational Review, 75 (2), 133-173.

Due in class:  Draft description of proposed school’s purpose, location, and students/community.

Resources on Community Organizing and Community Involvement


Week 11 - November 10: Theories of learning.
What theories of learning underlie the design of a school? What are the goals? How will they be achieved?

  • Resnick, L. & Hall, M. (1998). “Learning organizations for sustainable organizational change. Daedulus, 127, 89-118.
  • Thomas, D. & Seely-Brown, J.S. (2009). Learning for a World of Constant Change:  Homo Sapiens, Homo Faber & Homo Ludens revisited.    Paper presented at the 7th Glion Colloquium

Due in class: Initial draft/outline of the school’s curriculum

Due Monday November 15 at 6 PM: Drafts of the Executive Summary and supporting documents for key elements of the design (such as curriculum and instruction materials or hiring criteria and professional development plans, etc.

Week 12 - November 17: Discussion of initial design proposals.

Week 13 - November 24: No class.

Resources for theories of learning:

Architectural design and learning:

Week 14 - December 1: Professional Development. 
What do staff members need to know and do?  What kinds of support do they need?

Recommended:

  • Hatch, T. (2009). “Working on hiring and turnover” and “Creating a productive work environment.” Chapters 4 & 5 in Managing to change:  How schools can survive (and sometimes thrive) in turbulent times.  New York:  Teachers College Press.

Due in class: Outlines of staff hiring and selection criteria and/or professional development plans.

Resources on Teaching and Professional Development

Week 15 - December 8: Assessment and Accountability
How should a school be assessed and to whom is it accountable?

Required:

  • Darling-Hammond, L. & Snyder, J. (1992). "Reframing Accountability: Creating Learner-Centered Schools" In Ann Lieberman (Ed.), The Changing Context of Teaching, Ninety-first Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education, (11-36). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Ninety-first Yearbook of the National Society for the Study of Education, 11-36. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Furman, S. (1999) "The New Accountability" Consortium for Policy Research in Education University of Pennsylvania.
  • Abelman, C. & Elmore, R. (1999) "When accountability knocks, will anyone answer?
  • McDonald, J. (1993). The dilemmas of planning backwards. Providence, RI: Coalition of Essential Schools.

Recommended:

  • Hatch, T. (2009). “Managing the external environment.” Chapter 7 in Managing To Change: How schools can survive (and sometimes thrive) in turbulent times. New York: Teachers College Press.

Due in class: Outlines of staff hiring and selection criteria and/or professional development plans.

Resources on Testing

 


Week 16 - December 15: Design Presentations & Reflections
            Power point design presentations and reflections and implications for future work.

Due: Final design portfolios.

Due by 12/20 7 PM: 4-5 page position papers and reflections.

 

Fall 2010
C&T 4004: School Change
Thomas Hatch, Teachers College

 

About Thomas Hatch