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Suniya S. Luthar

Professional Background

Educational Background

B.Sc., M.Sc., Delhi University (India); Ph.D., Yale University

Scholarly Interests

Developmental psychopathology and resilience among children and families at risk.



 

Selected Publications

Luthar, S. S., Barkin, S. H., & Crossman, E. J.  (2013).   "I can, therefore I must": Fragility in the upper-middle classes.  Development and Psychopathology, 25th Anniversary Special Issue, 25, 1529-1549. 


Luthar, S. S. (2013).   The problem with rich kids  Psychology Today, Nov-Dec. 62-69, 87.


Luthar, S. S., & Lyman, E.  (In press). Resilience and Positive Psychology.   In M. Lewis and K. Rudolph (Eds.), Handbook of Developmental Psychopathology (3rd Edition).  Norwell, MA: Kluwer/ Academic Press.  


Luthar, S. S., & Barkin, S. H.  (2012).  Are affluent youth truly "at risk"? Vulnerability and resilience across three diverse samples.   Development and Psychopathology, 24, 429-449.  


 Ansary, N. A.. & Luthar, S. S. (2009).  Distress and academic achievement among adolescents of affluence: A study of externalizing and internalizing problem behaviors and school performance.  Development and Psychopathology, 21, 319-341.

Yates, T. M., Tracy, A. J., Luthar, S. S. (2008).  Nonsuicidal self-injury among "privileged" youth: Longitudinal and cross-sectional approaches to developmental processes. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 76, 52-62.

Luthar, S. S., & Goldstein, A.  (2008).  Substance use and related behaviors among suburban late adolescents: The importance of perceived parent containment. Development and Psychopathology, 20, 591-614.
 
Luthar, S.S., & Sexton, C. C. (2007).Maternal drug abuse versus maternal depression: Vulnerability and resilience among school-age and adolescent offspring. Development and Psychopathology, 19, 205-225.

Luthar, S. S., Suchman, N. E., & Altomare, M. (2007). Relational Psychotherapy Mothers Group: A randomized clinical trial for substance abusing mothers. Development and Psychopathology, 19, 243-261.

Luthar, S. S. & Brown, P. J. (2007). Maximizing resilience through diverse levels of inquiry: Prevailing paradigms, possibilities and priorities for the future.Development and Psychopathology, 19, 931-955.

Becker, B., & Luthar S. S. (2007). Peer-perceived admiration and social preference: contextual correlates of positive peer regard among suburban and urban adolescents. Journal of research on adolescence, 17(1), 117-144.

Luthar, S. S., Shoum, K. A.,Brown, P.J. (2006). Extracurricular involvement among affluent youth: A scapegoat for "ubiquitous achievement pressures"?. Developmental Psychology, 42, 583-597.

Luthar, S. S. (2006). Resilience in development: A synthesis of research across five decades. In D. Cicchetti & D. J. Cohen (Eds.), Developmental Psychopathology: Risk, disorder, and adaptation (pp. 740-795). New York: Wiley.

Luthar, S. S., & Latendresse, S. J. (2005). Children of the affluent: Challenges to well-being. Current Directions in Psychological Science,14 , 49-53.

Luthar, S. S. (2003). The culture of affluence: Psychological costs of material wealth. Child Development, 74, 1581-1593.

Luthar, S.S. (Ed.) (2003).Resilience and vulnerability: Adaptation in the context of childhood adversities. Cambridge University Press.


biographical information

curriculum vitae

SUNIYA S. LUTHAR, Ph.D.

EDUCATION

1990 Ph.D. Developmental / Clinical Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT

1980 M.S. Child Development, Delhi University, India

1978 B.S. (Honors) Delhi University, India

CAREER

2006 - Faculty Advisor, Family Research Consortium: National Interdisciplinary Consortium with the National Institutes of Health (PI Belinda Tucker).
 
2001 - Professor, Developmental and Clinical Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York.
 
2006 - Chair, Dept. of Counseling and Clinical Psychology, Teachers College

1997 - 2001 Associate Professor, Developmental Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University.

1997 - Research Affiliate, Yale University School of Medicine; Director; Child & Family Research, APT Foundation, New Haven, CT.

1994 - 1996 Assistant Professor, Departments of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT.

1994 - 1996 Director, Child & Family Research, Substance Abuse Treatment Unit, Yale University School of Medicine.

1992 - 1996 Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine.

1990 - 1992 Associate Research Scientist, Department of Psychiatry and Child Study Center (joint appointment 1991-92), Yale University School of Medicine.

1989 - 1990 Postdoctoral fellow, Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT.

1988 - 1989 Predoctoral clinical psychology intern, Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT.

1981 - 1984 Lecturer, Child Development, Lady Irwin College, Delhi University, India.

AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

2009  Award for Mentorship, Courage, and Integrity: Asian Caucus of the Society for Research in Child Development.

2007-2008  Member, Commitee on the Socioeconomic Status: American Psychological Association- Board for the Advancement of Psychology in the Public Interest
 
2006   Fellow, American Association for Psychological Science (APS) for Distinguished Contributions to Psychological Science

2006-2009   Member, Governing Council, Society for Research in Child Development
 
2005 - 2006  The Outstanding Teacher Award. Teachers College, Columbia University.

2003 - 2004  The Outstanding Teacher Award. Teachers College, Columbia University.

2002 - 2003  The Outstanding Teacher Award. Teachers College, Columbia University.

2002  Chair, Initial Review Group: National Institute of Health, Center for Scientific Review: Psychosocial Risk Prevention and Health Behavior-1 Review Committee (Term: 2002 - 2004).

1998  Boyd McCandless Young Scientist Award for Early Career Contributions. American Psychological Association, Division 7: Developmental Psychology.

1996  Outstanding Contributions to Child Development. Delhi University, India.

1995  American Mensa Education & Research Foundation Award for excellence in research on intelligence and intellectual giftedness.

1993  Research Scientist Development Award (K-21). National Institute on Drug Abuse.

1990  American Psychological Association Dissertation Award, Div. 37:Child, Youth, & Family Services.

1988  Enders Prize Fellowship: support for dissertation research, Yale University.

1987  Enders Prize Fellowship: support for independent research, Yale University.

1978  All India Post Graduate Merit Scholarship.

PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

"FONT-SIZE: 12pt ">Grant reviews: National Institutes of Health  

Chair, Initial Review Group: National Institute of Health, Center for Scientific Review: Risk Prevention and Health Behavior-1 Review Committee (2002-2004).

Member, Initial Review Group: National Institute of Mental Health Child/Adolescent Development, Risk, and Prevention Review Committee (06/1998 - 02/1999).

Chair, Special Emphasis Panels, Center for Scientific Review RHPB-3 (03/2001; 07/2000).

Member, Special Emphasis Panel National Institute on Drug Abuse: Behavioral Therapy Development and Behavioral Science (07/1999).

Ad hoc member, Initial Review Groups: National Institute on Mental Health (1997, 1998), National Institute on Drug Abuse (1993, 1996).

Site visit for RO1 grant: National Institute on Drug Abuse (1995).

"font-weight: normal; font-size: medium; ">"FONT-SIZE: 14pt ">Grant reviews: Other

National Science Foundation, Smith-Richardson Foundation, William T. Grant Foundation

"font-weight: normal; font-size: medium; ">"FONT-SIZE: 14pt ">Journal reviews/ Editorial responsibilities  

Associate Editor: Developmental Psychology (2004 -2007),
Development and Psychopathology (1999 - 2008)
Editorial board: Annual Review of Clinical Psychology (2003 - 2005),
DevelopmentalPsychology (1999 - 2003),
Child Development (1994 - 1997)
Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development
Ad hoc manuscript reviews: Child Development, Developmental Psychology,
Development and Psychopathology, Psychological Bulletin, American Psychologist,
Journal on Adolescent Research, Journal of Research on Adolescence, Journal of
Clinical Child Psychology, American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, Addiction

"font-size: medium; ">Reviews of books / book proposals

Cambridge University Press; Harvard University Press; Erlbaum

"FONT-SIZE: 14pt ">"FONT-SIZE: 12pt ">GRANTS AND CONTRACTS  

Principal Investigator: Family Research Consortium - V. National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse, OBSSR; (R13 MH082592-01); Dates: May 01, 2008 - April 30, 2011.

Principal Investigator: "Maternal Drug Abuse, Psychopathology, and Child Adaptation". National Institute on Drug Abuse (2 R01 DA010726-12); dates: 09/30/2007 - 05/31/2012; costs: $2,785,648.

Principal Investigator: "Substance Abuse Among Suburban Youth: A Prospective Study". National Institute on Drug Abuse (DA014385-01); dates: 02/01/2003 - 01/31/2008; total costs: $1,262,126.

Principal Investigator: "Maternal Drug Abuse, Psychopathology, and Child Adaptation". National Institute on Drug Abuse (RO1DA10726-07); dates: 04/01/2002 - 03/01/2007; total costs: $1,933, 415.

Principal Investigator: "Vulnerability and competence among suburban youth: A seven wave longitudinal study". William T. Grant Foundation; dates: 06/01/2001 - 05/31/2006; total costs: $502,845.

Principal Investigator: "Relational Parenting Groups for DCF-involved mothers". Department of Children and Families, State of Connecticut; dates: 01/03/2000 - 06/31/2000; total costs: $11,000.

Principal Investigator: "Risk and resilience among suburban adolescents: A three-year longitudinal study". William T. Grant Foundation; dates: 04/01/1999 - 03/31/2001; total costs: $53,705.

Co-Principal Investigator: "Aggression in school-age children". Co-Investigators: Marla Brassard, Terry Orr, Charles Basch, Teachers College, Columbia University. Spencer Foundation; dates: 08/01/1999 - 07/31/2001; total costs: $300,000.

Co-investigator: "Drug-Dependent Fathers: A Developmental Perspective" P.I.: Thomas McMahon, Yale University. National Institute on Drug Abuse (RO1-DA11988); dates: 07/01/1998 - 06/30/2000; total costs: $136,787.

Principal Investigator: "Relational Parenting Therapy for Opioid Abusing Mothers". National Institute on Drug Abuse (RO1-DA11498); dates: 01/01/1998 - 11/30/2002; total costs: $2,226,520.

Principal Investigator: "Maternal drug use, psychopathology, and child adaptation".National Institute on Drug Abuse (RO1-DA10726); dates: 09/30/1996 - 09/29/2001; total costs: $1,513,080.

Principal Investigator: "Risk and resilience among adolescents". William T. Grant Foundation; dates: 07/01/1996 - 06/30/1997; total costs: $5,000.
 
Faculty Award: Salary support from the Smith Richardson Foundation, Westport. CT, to supplement NIDA Research Scientist Development Award; dates: 08/01/1996 - 07/31/1997; total costs: $19,019

Principal Investigator: "Psychosocial profiles associated with adolescent substance use: A school-based, needs-assessment study". Component grant within the "Psychotherapy Development for Cocaine and Opioid Abuse" Center funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse; Center PI: Bruce Rounsaville, M.D. (P50-DA09241); dates: 09/01/1995 - 08/01/1997; total costs: $11,800.

Principal Investigator: "Relational Psychotherapy Parenting for addicted mothers"Component grant within the "Psychotherapy Development for Cocaine and Opioid Abuse" Center funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse; Center PI: Bruce Rounsaville, M.D. (P50-DA09241); dates: 09/01/1994 - 08/31/1997; total costs: $401,628.

Co-Investigator: "Parenting stress in opioid dependent women and the developmental competence of their children: A study of treatment needs". Component grant within the "Psychotherapy Development for Cocaine and Opioid Abuse" Center funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse; PI: Bruce Rounsaville, M.D. (P50-DA09241); dates: 09/01/1994 - 08/01/1996; total costs: $11,862.

Research Scientist Development Award (K21) from National Institute on Drug Abuse (K21-DA00202); dates: 08/01/1993 - 07/31/1998; total costs: $574,066

Principal Investigator on grant from the Social Science Research Council, New York, for research on resilience among underprivileged adolescents. Funded by the Rockefeller Foundation; dates: 09/1990 - 12/1991; total costs: $6,850.

CONSULTATIONS: SCIENTIFIC/ GRANTS
Member, American Psychological Association Task Force on Resilience and Strength in Black Children and Adolescents: Review/recommendations provided for final report, 2007.
 
Chair, Mentorship Awards Commitee, 2006-2008. American Psychological Association, Division 7.

Consultant, "Fostering Healthy Futures Efficacy Trial for Preadolescent Youth in Foster Care." Project PI Heather Taussig, University of Colorado, Denver (R01 MH076919-01A1, 2007-2012).
 
Advisory Board Member, for NIH-funded Developing Center Grant project, Delivering Family-Centered Preventions to Rural African American Families. PI. Gene Brody, Ph.D. 2003- 2008.
Consultant, "Defining Fatherhood among Drug-dependent Men." Project P.I. Susan Witte, Columbia University School of Social Work. National Institute on Drug Abuse Grant, 2003 - 2005.

Training for grant peer review: NIH Peer Review Orientation Workshop, Bethesda, MD, July 24 - 25, 2003; One of two NIH review committee Chairs training new scientists slated to join behavioral science review committees.

Training for grant peer review: NIH Peer Review Orientation Workshop, Bethesda, MD, July 29 - 30, 2002; One of two NIH review committee Chairs training new scientists slated to join behavioral science review committees.

Consultant, "Parent Intervention for Drug-Abusing Fathers." Project P.I. T. J. McMahon, Ph.D., Yale University School of Medicine. In B. J. Rounsaville (PI), Psychotherapy development research center. National Institute on Drug Abuse Grant (P50DA09241), 1999 - 2002.

Consultant, "Exposure to chronic community violence and its consequences." P.I. Beth Rosenthal, D.S.W., York College, City University of New York. National Institute of Mental Health grant, 1997.

Consultant, "Longitudinal effects of prenatal cocaine exposure." P.I. Linda Mayes, M.D., Yale University School of Medicine. National Institute on Drug Abuse Grant, 1997 - 1998.

CONSULTATIONS/ACTIVITIES: POLICY

Research Committee of the Canadian Centre of Excellence for Early Childhood Development. Consultation on preparation and dissemination of literature review on resilience. Committee chair: Ron Barr, Ph. D.; Centre Director: Richard Tremblay, Ph. D. February 2005.

National Center for Children in Poverty's Unclaimed Children II. Member, Advisory Group. Focused on current social policies regarding children's mental health. Chairs: Jane Knitzer, Ed.D. and Mareasa Isaacs, Ph.D. October 2004 - (ongoing).

Society for Research in Child Development. Member, Ethnic and Racial Issues Committee. 2003 - (ongoing).

"Health Rocks! Study of Positive Youth Development". Advisory Board Member, for Project of National 4H Council, coordinated by Richard Lerner, Tufts University, and Alexander von Eye, Michigan State University. September 2001 - (ongoing).

Bernard van Leer Foundation, The Hague, The Netherlands. Review of three papers on early childhood programs seeking to foster resilient adaptation. January 1 - May 15, 2001.

Center for Mental Health Services, SAMHSA, US Department of Health and Human Services. Developing a working definition of, and measurement approach for, the construct of resilience for the use by CMHS grantees. October 1, 2000 - May 1, 2001.

Department of Children and Families, State of Connecticut. Consulting with state administrators to monitor, streamline, and evaluate state-supported services for substance-abusing mothers and their children. October 1999 - (ongoing).

Rochester Child Health Congress Leadership and Advocacy Program.One of 50 multidisciplinary Congress members identified as future academic leaders in maternal-child health. Rochester, NY, October 22 - 24, 1999.

Faculty Seminar on Child and Family Policy, Institute on Child and Family Policy, Columbia University. New York, NY, 1999 - 2000.

"Childhood resilience and policy"Workgroup sponsored by the Center for Mental Health Services (SAMHSA). Initial meetings: Fairfax, Virginia, June 16 - 18, 1999.

"Children's mental health and social policy". Workgroup sponsored by the Center for Mental Health Services (SAMHSA) and the American Orthopsychiatric Association. Initial meetings: Washington, DC, September 24 - 25, 1998.

CONSULTATIONS: COMMUNITY

Department of Human Services, Mercer Island, WA. Informing interventions to promote positive development among resident youth. 2005 - (ongoing).

American Psychological Association Practice Directorate: "Resilience Initiative". Using findings from current research, consulting in the design of a brochure and a television documentary (developed with the Discovery Channel) to educate the public about resilient adaptation and how it is achieved. 2002.

Springfield, MA schools and Smith School of Social Work, MA.. Collaborating in the design and evaluation of research-based preventive mental health interventions in inner-city public schools. 2000 - (ongoing).

Department of Human Services, Westport, CT. Designing and conducting series of parent support group meetings for families in the community. 1997 - (ongoing).

Parent Teacher Associations, Westport, CT: Interactive presentations on behavioral adjustment and substance use among middle and elementary school students. 1997 - (ongoing).

New Haven Transitional School. Supervision of faculty and counselors in a multidisciplinary community support treatment team. In collaboration with the Connecticut Mental Health Center and the Department of Psychiatry, Yale University. 1994 - 1997.

New Haven Adolescent Comprehensive Treatment System (ACTS). Designed a research-based battery of assessments for youth at risk for substance abuse, to monitor treatment needs and progress in treatment. Provide ongoing supervision of faculty in project. In collaboration with the Connecticut Department of Child and Family Services, Yale University, & the APT Foundation. 1993 - 1997.

Women in Treatment: Research-based assessments to characterize population and monitor treatment success among patients in a multifaceted methadone program for women. In collaboration with the APT Foundation, New Haven, 1992 - (ongoing).

Professional Development CEU for staff in Bridgeport high schools (1992 - 1996).

Testimonies as expert witness/evaluations ordered by Juvenile Court, New Haven.

Services/placement of adolescent boy with delinquent record, August, 1995.

School services for adolescent girl, August, 1993.

Maternal alleged abandonment of infant, June, 1992.

Parental neglect of adolescent boys, October 1992.

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS

American Psychological Association

Society for Research in Child Development

Division 37 (Child, Youth and Family), American Psychological Association

Division 7 (Developmental Psychology), American Psychological Association

American Orthopsychiatric Association

CERTIFICATIONS

Licensed clinical psychologist, Connecticut License #001710, 12/06/91.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Journal articles

Bick, J., Naumova, O., Hunter, S., Barbot, B., Lee, M., Luthar, S. S., Raefski, A., & Grigorenko, E. L. (In press). Childhood Adversity and DNA Methylation of Genes involved in the HPA axis and Immune System: Whole Genome and Candidate Gene Associations.  Development and Psychopathology,

 

Luthar, S. S., & Barkin, S. H.  (2012).  Are affluent youth truly "at risk"?  Vulnerability and resilience across three diverse samples.   Development and Psychopathology, 24, 429-449.

 

David, D., McMahon, T., Luthar, S.S., & Suchman, N.  (In press).  Sensation seeking, coping with stress, and readiness to engage in therapy: Does ego development influence the psychosocial functioning of substance-abusing mothers?  American Journal of Orthopsychiatry. 

 

Ansary, N., McMahon, T.J., & Luthar, S. S.  (In press).  Socioeconomic context and emotional-behavioral links: Concurrent and prospective associations among low income and high income youth.  Journal of Research on Adolescence.

 

Racz, S., McMahon, R., & Luthar, S. S.  (2011). Risky Behavior in Affluent Youth: Examining the Co-occurrence and Consequences of Multiple Problem Behaviors. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 20, 120-128.

 

Borelli, J. L., Luthar, S. S.,  & Suchman. N. E.  (2010).  Discrepancies in perceptions of maternal aggression: Implications for children of methadone-maintained mothers.  American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 80, i412-421.

 

Yoo, J., Brown, P.J., & Luthar, S. S.  (2009).  Children with co-occurring internalizing and externalizing behavior problems: Family risks and implications for competence.  American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 79, 532-540.   


Ansary, N. A.. & Luthar, S. S.  (2009).  Distress and academic achievement among adolescents of affluence:  A study of externalizing and internalizing problem behaviors and school performance.  Development and Psychopathology, 21. 319-341.


Yates, T. M., Tracy, A. J., Luthar, S. S.  (2008).  Nonsuicidal self-injury among "privileged" youth: Longitudinal and cross-sectional approaches to developmental processes.  Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 76, 52-62.


Luthar, S. S., & Goldstein, A. S.  (2008).  Substance use and related behaviors among suburban late adolescents: The importance of perceived parent containment.  Development and Psychopathology, 20, 591-614.


Luthar, S. S., & Brown, P. J. (2007). Maximizing resilience through diverse levels of inquiry: Prevailing paradigms, possibilities, and priorities for the future. Development and Psychopathology, 19, 931-955.
 
Luthar, S.S., & Sexton, C. C. (2007). Maternal drug abuse versus maternal depression: Vulnerability and resilience among school-age and adolescent offspring. Development and Psychopathology, 19, 205-225.
 
Luthar, S. S., Suchman, N. E., & Altomare, M. (2007). Relational Psychotherapy Mothers Group: A randomized clinical trial for substance abusing mothers. Development and Psychopathology, 19, 243-261.
 
Becker, B. E., & Luthar, S. S. (2007). Peer-perceived admiration and social preference: Contextual correlates of positive peer regard among suburban and urban adolescents. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 17, 117-144.
 
Luthar, S. S., Sawyer, J., Brown, P.J. (2006). Conceptual issues in studies of resilience: Past, present, and future research. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1094 (1), 105-115.

Luthar, S.S. (2006). "Overscheduling" versus other stressors: Challenges of high socioeconomic status families. Social Policy Report, Society for Research in Child Development. XX (IV)

Luthar, S. S., Shoum, K. A., & Brown, P.J. (2006). Extracurricular involvement among affluent youth: A scapegoat for "ubiquitous achievement pressures?" Developmental Psychology, 42, 583-597

McMahon, T. J., & Luthar, S. S. (2006). Substance use, emotional distress, delinquent behavior, and social competence: A longitudinal study of affluent, suburban high school students. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 35 72-89.

Suchman, N. E., McMAhon, T. J., Zhang, H., Mayes, L., & Luthar, S. S. (2006) Substance abusing mothers and disruptions in child custody: An attachment perspective. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 30, 197-204.

Suchman, N. E., McMahon, T. J., Slade, A., & Luthar, S. S. (2005). How early bonding, depression, illicit drug use, and perceived support work together to influence drug-dependent mothers' caregiving. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 75, 431-445.  

McMahon, T. J., Winkel, J. D. Luthar, S. S., Rounsaville B. J. (2005). Looking for poppa: Parenting status of men versus women seeking drug abuse treatment. The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 1, 79-91.

Luthar, S. S., & Ansary, N.(2005). Dimensions of adolescent rebellion: Risks for academic failure among high- and low-income youth. Development and Psychopathology,17, 231-250.

Luthar, S. S., & Latendresse, S. J. (2005). Comparable "risks" at the SES extremes: Pre-adolescents' perceptions of parenting. Development and Psychopathology, 17, 207-230.

Luthar, S. S., & Latendresse, S. J. (2005). Children of the affluent: Challenges to well-being. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 14, 49-53.

Luthar, S. S., & Sexton, C. (2004). The high price of affluence. In R. V. Kail (Ed.), Advances in Child Development, 32, 126-162. San Diego, CA: Academic Press.

Luthar, S. S., & Goldstein, A. (2004). Children's exposure to community violence: Implications for understanding risk and resilience. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 33, 499-505.

Suchman, N. E., McMahon, T. J., & Luthar, S. S., (2004). Interpersonal maladjustment as predictor of mothers' response to a relational parenting intervention. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 27, 135-143.

Luthar, S. S. (2003). The culture of affluence: Psychological costs of material wealth. Child Development, 74, 1581-1593.

Reyland, S. A., McMahon, T. J., Higgins-Delessandro, A., & Luthar, S. S. (2002). Inner-city children living with an HIV-seropositive mother: Parent-child relationships, perception of social support, and psychological disturbance. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 11, 313-329.

Becker, B. E., & Luthar, S. S. (2002). Social-emotional factors affecting achievement outcomes among disadvantaged students: Closing the achievement gap. Educational Psychologist, 37, 197-214.

Luthar, S. S., & Becker, B. E. (2002). Privileged but pressured?: A study of affluent youth. Child Development, 73, 1593-1610.

McMahon, T. J., Winkel, J. D., Suchman, N. E., & Luthar, S. S. (2002). Drug dependence, parenting responsibilities, and treatment history: Why doesn't mom go for help? Drug andAlcohol Dependence, 65, 105-114.

Suchman, N E., & Luthar, S. S. (2001). The mediating role of parenting stress in methadone-maintained mothers' parenting. Parenting: Science and Practice, 1, 285-315.

Luthar, S. S. (2001). Families under stress: Patterns of adaptation. Contemporary Psychology, 4, 154-156.

Luthar, S. S., Doyle, K., Suchman, N. E., & Mayes, L. (2001). Developmental themes in women's emotional experiences of motherhood. Development and Psychopathology, 13, 165-182.

Luthar, S. S. & Cicchetti, D. (2000). The construct of resilience: Implications for interventions and social policies. Development and Psychopathology, 12, 857-885.

DeCarlo, L. T., & Luthar, S. S. (2000). Analysis and class validation of a measure of parental values perceived by preadolescents: An application of a latent class model for rankings. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 60, 578-591.

Luthar, S. S., Cicchetti, D., & Becker, B. (2000a). The construct of resilience: A critical evaluation and guidelines for future work. Child Development, 71, 543-562.

- Top 1% of papers cited in Psychiatry / Psychology. ISI Essential Science Indicators, February 2002. http:esi-topics.com/

Luthar, S. S., Cicchetti, D., & Becker, B. (2000b). Research on resilience: Reply to commentaries. Child Development, 71, 573-575.

Luthar, S. S., & Suchman, N. E. (2000). Relational Psychotherapy Mothers' Group: A developmentally informed intervention for at-risk mothers. Development and Psychopathology, 12, 235-253.

McMahon, T.J., & Luthar, S. S. (2000). Women in treatment: Within-gender differences in the clinical presentation of opioid-dependent women. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 188, 679-687.

Ripple, C. & Luthar, S.S. (2000). Academic risk among inner-city adolescents: The role of personal attributes. Journal of School Psychology, 38, 277-298.

Suchman, N. E., & Luthar, S. S. (2000). Maternal addiction, child maladjustment, and sociodemographic risks: Implications for parenting behaviors. Addiction, 95, 1417-1428.

Cicchetti, D., & Luthar, S. S. (1999). Editorial: Developmental approaches to substance use and abuse. Development and Psychopathology, 11, 655-656.

Luthar, S. S., & Cushing, G. (1999). Neighborhood influences and child development: A prospective study of substance abusers' children. Development and Psychopathology, 11, 763-784.

Luthar, S. S., & D'Avanzo, K. (1999). Contextual factors in substance use: A study of suburban and inner-city adolescents. Development and Psychopathology, 11, 845-867.

Luthar, S. S., Cushing, G., Merikangas, K., & Rounsaville, B. J. (1998). Multiple jeopardy: Risk and protective factors among addicted mothers' offspring. Development and Psychopathology, 10, 117-136.

Bybee, J. A., Luthar, S., Zigler, E., & Merisca, R. (1997). The fantasy, ideal, and ought selves: Content, relationships to mental health, and functions. Social Cognition, 15, 37-53.

Luthar, S. S., & Cushing, G. (1997). Substance use and personal adjustment among disadvantaged teenagers: A six-month prospective study. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 26, 353?372.

Luthar, S. S., Cushing, G., & Rounsaville, B. J. (1996). Gender differences among opioid abusers: Pathways to disorder and profiles of psychopathology. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 43, 179-189.

Blatt, S. J., Zohar, A., Quinlan, D. M., Luthar, S., & Hart, B. (1996). Levels of relatedness within the dependency factor of the Depressive Experiences Questionnaire for Adolescents. Journal of Personality Assessment, 67, 52-71.

Luthar, S. S., & McMahon, T. J. (1996). Peer reputation among inner-city adolescents: Structure and correlates. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 6, 581-603.

Ripple, C. H., & Luthar, S. S. (1996). Familial factors in illicit drug abuse: An interdisciplinary perspective. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 22, 147-172.

Luthar, S. S. (1995). Social competence in the school setting: Prospective cross-domain associations among inner-city teens. Child Development, 66, 416-429.

Luthar, S. S., & Blatt, S. J. (1995). Differential vulnerability of dependency and self-criticism among disadvantaged teenagers. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 5, 431-449.

Luthar, S.S., & Walsh, K. (1995). Treatment needs of drug-addicted mothers: Integrated parenting psychotherapy interventions. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 12 341-348.

Luthar, S. S., Woolston, J. W., Sparrow, S. S., Zimmerman, L. D., & Riddle, M. A. (1995). Adaptive behaviors among psychiatrically hospitalized children: The role of intelligence and related attributes. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 24, 98-108.

Luthar, S. S., & Ripple, C. H. (1994). Sensitivity to emotional distress among intelligent adolescents: A short-term prospective study. Development and Psychopathology, 6, 343-357.

Luthar, S. S. (1993). Annotation: Methodological and conceptual issues in research on child resilience. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 34, 441-453.

Luthar, S. S., Ball, S., & Rounsaville, B. J. (1993). Psychiatric disorders among relatives of cocaine-abusing individuals: Assessment of familial risk. American Journal on Addictions, 2, 225-231.

Luthar, S. S., & Blatt, S. J. (1993). Dependent and self-critical depressive experiences among inner city adolescents. Journal of Personality, 61, 365-386.

Luthar, S. S., Doernberger, C. H., & Zigler, E. (1993). Resilience is not a unidimensional construct: Insights from a prospective study of inner-city adolescents. Development and Psychopathology. Special Issue: Milestones in the development of resilience, 5, 703-717.

Luthar, S. S., Glick, M., Zigler, E., & Rounsaville, B. J. (1993). Social competence among cocaine abusers: Moderating effects of comorbid diagnoses and gender. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 19, 283-298.

Luthar, S. S., Merikangas, K. R., & Rounsaville, B. J. (1993). Parental psychopathology and disorders in offspring: A study of relatives of drug abusers. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 181, 351-357.

Luthar, S. S., & Quinlan, D.M. (1993). Parental images in two cultures: A study of women in India and America. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 24, 186-202.

Luthar, S. S., & Rounsaville, B. J. (1993). Substance misuse and comorbid psychopathology in a high-risk group: A study of siblings of cocaine misusers. International Journal of the Addictions, 28, 415-434.

Luthar, S. S., Anton, S. F., Merikangas, K. R., & Rounsaville, B. J. (1992). Vulnerability to drug abuse among opioid addicts' siblings: Individual, familial, and peer influences. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 33, 190-196.

Luthar, S. S., Anton, S. F., Merikangas, K. R., & Rounsaville, B. J. (1992). Vulnerability to substance abuse and psychopathology among siblings of opioid abusers. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 180, 153-161.

Luthar, S. S., & Zigler, E. (1992). Intelligence and social competence among high-risk adolescents. Development and Psychopathology, 4, 287-299.

Luthar, S. S., Zigler, E., & Goldstein, D. (1992). Psychosocial adjustment among intellectually gifted adolescents: The role of cognitive-developmental and experiential factors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 33, 361-373.

Luthar, S. S. (1991). Vulnerability and resilience: A study of high-risk adolescents. Child Development, 62, 600-616.

- Reprinted in the 1996 edition of Timely Issues in Print Series: The resilience factor. Greenville, NC: East Carolina University Regional Training Center.

Luthar, S. S., & Zigler, E. (1991). Vulnerability and competence: A review of research on resilience in childhood. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 61, 6-22.

- Reprinted in M. E. Hertzig & E. A. Farber (Eds.) (1993) Annual Progress in Child Psychiatry and Child Development: 1992 (pp. 232-255). New York: Brunner/Mazel.

Miller, J. G., & Luthar, S. (1989). Issues of interpersonal responsibility and accountability: A comparison of Indians' and Americans' moral judgments. Social Cognition, 7, 237-261.

Luthar, S., & Zigler, E. (1988). Motivational factors, school atmosphere and SES: Determinants of children's probability task performance. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 9, 477-494.

"font-weight: normal; font-size: medium; ">Books/ Monographs

Luthar, S.S. (Ed.) (2003). Resilience and vulnerability: Adaptation in the context of childhood adversities. Cambridge University Press.

Cicchetti, D., & Luthar, S. S. (Eds). (1999). Development and Psychopathology Special Issue: Developmental Approaches to Substance Use.

Luthar, S. S. (1999). Poverty and children's adjustment. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Luthar, S. S., Burack, J. A., Cicchetti, D., & Weisz, J. R. (Eds.) (1997). Developmental Psychopathology: Perspectives on adjustment, risk, and disorder. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Luthar, S. (1984). Immunizing more children: Towards greater community participation. New Delhi: UNICEF.

Chapters

Luthar, S. S. & Prince, R. P. (2007). Developmental psychopathology: Risk, disorder, and resilience. In A. Martin and F. R. Volkmar (Eds.), Lewis's Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - A Comprehensive Textbook, Fourth Editionpp.291-301).Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.
 
Luthar, S. S. (2006). Resilience in development: A synthesis of research across five decades. In D. Cicchetti & D. J. Cohen (Eds.), Developmental Psychopathology: Risk, disorder, and adaptation (pp. 740-795). New York: Wiley.
 
Luthar, S.S. (2005). Resilience at an early age and its impact on child psychosocial development. In R.E. Tremblay, R.G. Barr, R.D. Peters (Eds.), Encyclopedia on Early Childhood Development (pp 1-6). Montreal, Quebec: Centre of Excellence for Early Childhood Development. Available at http://www.excellance-earlychildhood.ca/documents/LutharANGxp.pdf.

Luthar, S. S., D'Avanzo, K., & Hites, S. (2003). Parental substance abuse: Risks and resilience. In S. S. Luthar (Ed.), Resilience and vulnerability: Adaptation in the context of childhood adversities (pp. 104-129). Cambridge University Press.

Luthar, S. S. & Zelazo, L. B. (2003). Research on resilience: An integrative review. In S. S. Luthar (Ed.), Resilience and vulnerability: Adaptation in the context of childhood adversities (pp. 510-549). Cambridge University Press.

Luthar, S. S. & Latendresse, S. J. (2002). Adolescent risk: The costs of affluence. In C. S. Taylor, R. M. Lerner, & A. von Eye (Eds.). New directions for youth development: Theory, practice and research: Pathways to positive youth development among gang and non-gang youth (Vol. 95; G. Noam, Series Ed.). San Francisco: Jossey- Bass.

Luthar, S. S., & Burack, J. A. (2000). Adolescent wellness: In the eye of the beholder? In D. Cicchetti, J. Rappaport, I. Sandler, & R. Weissberg (Eds.), The promotion of wellness in children and adolescents (pp. 29-57). Washington, DC: Child Welfare League of America.

Luthar, S. S., & Cushing, G. (1999). Measurement issues in the empirical study of resilience: An overview. In M. Glantz & J. Johnson (Eds.) Resilience and development: Positive life adaptations (pp. 129-160). New York: Plenum Press.

Luthar, S. S., & Suchman, N. E. (1999). Developmentally informed parenting interventions: The Relational Psychotherapy Mothers' Group. In D. Cicchetti & S.L. Toth (Eds.), Rochester Symposium on Developmental Psychopathology, Volume 9: Developmental approaches to Prevention and Intervention (pp.271-309). Rochester, NY: University of Rochester Press.

McMahon, T. J., & Luthar, S. S. (1998). Bridging the gap for children as their parents enter substance abuse treatment. In R. L. Hampton, V. Senatore, & T. P. Gullota (Eds.), Bridging the fields of substance abuse and child welfare. Volume 7: Issues in children's and families' lives (pp. 143-187). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Luthar, S. S. (1997). Sociodemographic disadvantage and psychosocial adjustment: Perspectives from developmental psychopathology. In S.S. Luthar, J.A. Burack, D. Cicchetti, & J.R. Weisz, (Eds.) Developmental Psychopathology: Perspectives on adjustment, risk, and disorder (pp. 459-485). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Luthar, S. S., Cushing, G., & McMahon, T. J. (1997). Interdisciplinary interface: Developmental principles brought to substance abuse research. In S.S. Luthar, J.A. Burack, D. Cicchetti, & J.R. Weisz, (Eds.), Developmental Psychopathology: Perspectives on adjustment, risk, and disorder (pp. 437-456). New York: Cambridge University Press.

Rounsaville, B. J., & Luthar, S. (1992). Family/genetic studies of cocaine abusers and opioid addicts. In T. R. Kosten & H. D. Kleber (Eds.), Clinician's guide to cocaine addiction (pp. 206-221). New York: Guilford.

Luthar, S. (1984). Integration of hearing-impaired children in Delhi schools: An evaluative report. In P. Victor & A. Lowe (Eds.), Second All India Workshop for Teachers and Parents of Hearing-Impaired Children: Selected papers. New Delhi: Max Mueller Bhavan.

Luthar, S. (1981). Young people and growing up problems. In Annual Brochure of the Sanjivini Society for Mental Health, New Delhi.

Other

Luthar, S. S., Suchman, N. E., & Boltas, D. (1997). Relational Parenting Mothers' Group: A therapists' manual. Yale University, New Haven, CT.

"FONT-SIZE: 14pt ">"font-family: 'Times New Roman'; ">Selected Invited Presentations
"font-family: 'Times New Roman'; ">
"font-family: 'Times New Roman'; ">Luthar, S. S. (2010).  Women in white-collar, educated families: Multiple jeopardy?  Plenary presented at the Summer Institute of the Family Research Consortium - V, New York City, June 17-19.

Luthar, S.S.  (2010). Socio-economic vs. Psychosocial "Prosperity": Impact on Children and Families.  Presented at the United Nations NGO Committee on the Family, New York, NY, April  22.

"font-family: 'Times New Roman'; ">Luthar, S.S.  (2010). Fostering resilient adaptation among "privileged" youth.  Presented at Edgemont, NY, May 6.

"font-family: 'Times New Roman'; ">Luthar, S.S. (2008).  Privileged but pressured:  The risks of raising children in affluent communities.   Presented for New Castle CARES and the Chappaqua PTA, Chappaqua, NY, March 31.

"font-family: 'Times New Roman'; ">Luthar, S.S. (2008).  "Privileged" youth: Well-educated, well-to-do, but what of well-being?  Invited Views by two" session at the Society for Research on Adolescence, Chicago, IL, March 7.

Luthar, S.S. (2007). The resilience perspective in working with at-risk families. Plenary talk, Addiction and Children 2007 Conference, Sandefjord, Norway, September 26.

Luthar, S.S. (2007). Relational Psychotherapy for substance abusing mothers. Workshop conducted at Addiction and Children- 2007 Conference, Sandefjord, Norway, September 26.

Luthar, S. S. (2007). Reconceptualizing risk and resilience: Considerations for research and interventions. The Lawrenceville School Positive Psychology Conference, Lawrenceville, NJ, June 16 to June 18, 2007

Luthar, S. S. (2007). Well-being and resilience among affluent youth (...and the potential costs of "privilege"). The Lawrenceville School Positive Psychology Conference, Lawrenceville, NJ, June 16 to June 18, 2007.
 
Luthar , S.S. (2007) Children in overdrive: The costs of too much ambition. Presented at the ParentMap's Pathways Lecture Series. Bellevue, WA, April 24.
 
Luthar,S.S. (2007). Reporting to the community: Research findings. Presented atMercer Island, WA, April 23.

Luthar, S. S. (2007). The price of privilege. Presented at Swarthmore College, PA, April 17, 2007.

Luthar, S. S. (2007). "Privileged' children and families: Well-educated and well-off-but what of well-being? Presented at the Risk and Prevention Speaker Series, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA Feb 16.
 
Luthar, S. S. (2006). The price of privilege. Invited colloquim for the Department of Psychology and Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, April 12.

Luthar, S. S. (2006). Children of well-educated, white-college parents: Risks linked with "upward mobility". Presented at the Roxbury Latin School, Boston, MA, October 23.

Luthar, S. S. (2006). "Privileged" families: Risks unique to well-educated, affluent girls and mothers. Presented at the Yale Women's Health Research Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, October 11.

Luthar, S. S. (2006). Resilience and practice. I. Basic concepts. II. Applications in Interventions. III. Future directions. Series in a one-day workshop for researchers and service providers. Oslo, Norway, September 28.

Luthar, S. S. (2006). Privileged but pressured: Children of the well-educated and wealthy. Invited address for the American Psychological Association's Division 53 - Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, New Orleans, LA, August 10-13.

Luthar, S. S. (2006). The costs of affluence: Risks for child and adolescent development. Grand Rounds: Harvard University School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry. May 24, 2006.

Luthar, S. S. (2006). Conceptual issues in the study of resilience in children. Plenary talk at the New York Academy of Sciences conference on Resilience in Children, Arlington, VA, Feb. 26-28.

Luthar, S. S. (2005). Resilience: Current issues in research and applications. Keynote address at the International Conference on Childhoods 2005: Children and Youth in Emerging and Transforming Societies. Oslo, Norway, June 29 - July 3.

Luthar, S. S. (2005). Understanding risk, protection and resilience. Presented at the Center for Family Research, University of Georgia, February 10.

Luthar, S. S. (2004). The high costs of affluence: Research with suburban youth. Presented at the Department of Psychology, New York University. New York, New York, December 8.

Luthar, S. S. (2004). Reconceptualizing resilience: Considerations for research and interventions. Presented at the Carolina Consortium on Human Development, Center for Developmental Science, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, October 26.

Luthar, S. S. (2004). A new look at resilience: Summarizing major themes. Discussant for symposium, "A new look at resilience", Chair Michael Rutter. Presented at the 16th World Congress of the International Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions, August 22-26.

Luthar, S. S. (2004). The construct of resilience. Presented at the Institute of Medicine Board of Neuroscience and Behavioral Health annual meeting. Washington D.C., June 8.

Luthar, S. S. (2004). The Psychological Impact of Affluence on Adolescents. Student Assistance Services Corporation 15th Annual When the Holidays Aren't So Happy Conference: Affluence to Poverty, Research to Practice With Adolescents.Tarrytown, New York, January 13.

Luthar, S. S. (2003). Reconceptualizing Risk and Resilience. Center for Human Development and Family Research in Diverse Contexts (Penn State University): "Spring Speaker Series." University Park, Pennsylvania, April 9.

Luthar, S. S. (2003). Privileged but Pressured? Youth in affluent, suburban families. University of Pennsylvania, Graduate School of Education. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, March 26.

Luthar, S. S. (2003). The construct of resilience: Applications in interventions. Judge Baker Children's Center (Harvard Medical School) & Children's Hospital Department of Psychiatry Academic Teaching Conference Series 2002-2003: "Future Directions in Child Mental Health." Boston, Massachusetts, March 19.

Luthar, S. S. (2003). Privileged but Pressured? Development in the context of affluence. Yale University Psychology Department. New Haven, Connecticut, February 24.

Luthar, S. S. (2002). Reconceptualizing risk and resilience. Plenary talk at the Fourth Annual Summer Institute Family Research Consortium III: Family Processes, Mental Health and Positive Development in Diverse Contexts. Charlotte, North Carolina, June 20-23.

Luthar, S. S. (2001). The construct of resilience: Interventions and social policies. Presented at New York University, New York, March 29.

Luthar, S. S. (2000). Socioeconomic stressors: Youth in affluent, suburban communities. Society for Prevention Research Eighth Annual Meeting, Montreal, June 1-3.

Luthar, S. S. (2000). The construct of resilience: Applications in interventions. Keynote address at the XXXII Banff International Conference on Behavioral Sciences: Resilience: Children, Families, and Communities. Banff, Canada, March 19-22.

Luthar, S. S. (1998). Resilience among adolescents at risk. Presented at New York University, New York, September 30.

Luthar, S. S. (1998). Resilience among at-risk youth: Ephemeral, elusive, or robust? Boyd McCandless Young Scientist Award presentation, 106th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, San Francisco, August 14-18.

Luthar, S. S. (1998). Vulnerability and resilience among inner-city adolescents. Presented at the Center for Opportunities and Outcomes for People with Disabilities, Teachers College, Columbia University, April 09.

Luthar, S. S. (1997). Relational Psychotherapy Mothers' Group: Developmentally informed interventions with substance using mothers. Presented at the New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, October 22.

Luthar, S. S. (1997). Relational Psychotherapy Mothers' Group: An intervention for substance using mothers. Presented at the Bush Center in Child Development and Social Policy, New Haven, CT, April 25.

Luthar, S. S. (1996). Relational Psychotherapy Mothers' Group: Developmentally informed interventions with substance using mothers. Presented at the Rochester Symposium on Developmental Psychopathology: Developmental approaches to prevention and intervention. Rochester, NY, November 13-15.

Luthar, S. S. (1996). Resilience: A construct of value? Presented at the 104th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, Toronto, August 9-13.

Luthar, S. S. (1995). Resilience among inner-city teens. Presented at the Annual meetings of the American Psychological Association, New York City, August 11-15.

Luthar, S. S. (1994). Measurement issues in the study of resilience: An overview. Presented at a conference on "The role of resilience in drug abuse, alcohol abuse, and mental illness", sponsored by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Center for Mental Health Services, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institute of Mental Health, and National Association for Children of Alcoholics. Washington, D.C., December 5-6.

Luthar, S. S. (1993). Resilience among inner-city adolescents. Bush Center in Child Development and Social Policy, New Haven, CT, February 26.

Luthar, S. S. (1991). The study of resilience among high-risk adolescents: Methodological issues and salient findings. Presented at a conference on "Fostering Resilience", Institute of Mental Health Initiatives, Washington D.C., December 5-6.

Selected Media Citations 

Jewish Action Online, June 15.  (OU Marriage Survey: Do Frum Couples Have Happier Marriages?)

CNN Website, June 11.  (Adolescents and adventure: How much is too much?)

Scarsdale Inquirer, October 10, 2009.  (Who mothers Mommy?).

Judith Warner Blog: Domestic Disturbances, New York Times TimesSelect, Jan 29, 2009 (The myth of lost innocence).

US News, June 12, 2008  (Good Parents, Bad Results).  

Business Week, October 22, 2007. (I can get your kid into an Ivy)

Campus Outreach Webinar, September 10, 2007. (Motherhood, fatherhood, and parenting teens).

Seattle Times, July 13, 2007. (Parents warned: Let kids drink, and it'll cost you)

The Oregonian, April 29, 2007. (Affluence can mask drug abuse by students)

NBC, King5 Seattle News, April 24, 2007. (Study: Affluent Mercer Island youth at risk)

Seattle Times, April 21, 2007. (Mercer Island has it all, plus extra helping of teen angst)

The Phoenix, Swarthmore College's Newspaper, April 19, 2007. (Class differences-- Invisible yet pervasive)

Anne Tergeson Blog, Business Week Online, March 22, 2007. (The kids aren't all right: same goes for the moms)

Los Angeles Times, March 18, 2007. (Make college admissions a crapshot)

Contra Costa Times, February 19, 2007. (Lap of luxury breeds higher rates of teen sustance abuse)

Philadelphia Inquirer, February 15, 2007. (Families who have it all - child trouble included)

Judith Warner Blog: Domestic Disturbances, New York Times TimesSelect, Nov 30, 2006 (The Most-Troubled Moms)

The Judith Warner Radio Show, XM Radio, 11/2006 ("Privileged" mothers)

National Public Radio (WBUR), Here & Now, Sept. 14, 2006 (Wealthy teens more troubled)
http://www.here-now.org/shows/2006/09/20060914_2.asp

Boston Globe, August 18, 2006. (The more activities, the better)

CBS News and WebMD August 14, 2006. (Kids aren't really overscheduled)

MedicalNewsToday August 20, 2006 Experts Challenge Popular Belief That Today's Children Are "over-scheduled" (reprinted on more than 30 other sites)

Marin Independent Journal. July 25, 2006. The price of privilege: A generation of stressed-out kids

New York Times, June 4, 2006. (Lost Summer for the College-Bound). Section 9, p. 1 & 6.

New York Times Magazine. April 30, 2006, (A Question of Resilience). p. 54-59.

APS Observer, February 2005 (Rich Kid, Poor Kid) p. 11.

Boston Globe, January 20, 2005 (Parents see down side of wealth: Fear children more likely to engage in risky behavior)

Working Mothers (Connecting with Kids, Online), August 25, 2004 (What Parents Need to Know)

USA Today, July 28, 2004 (Working moms' kids do fine, as long as moms keep tabs)

World Congress of Families (Family Update, Online), April 13, 2004 (Family Research Abstract of the Week: Marital Benefit: Rich but Disturbed)

Westport News, December 19, 2003 (In praise of Westport's proactive approach)

CTNow.com (by The Hartford Courant), June 1, 2003 (A Community's Challenge: Why the lessons of Glastonbury's tragedy are so hard for teenagers to learn)

DIOPA (Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania), No Date (Teen and pastoral care)

The Philadelphia Inquirer, March 15, 2003 (All that's clear is the pain)

TheStar.com, February 9, 2003 (Children under pressure)

The Philadelphia Inquirer, February 03, 2003 (Help teens cope with isolation, stress)

Boston Globe, December 19, 2002 (Resiliency helps during Christmas morning upset)

Palo Alto Weekly, December 18, 2002 (On the Blackboard - Sobering Statistics)

Hartford Courant, December 16, 2002 (Parents Turn Up the Heat)

American Journal of Nursing, December 2002 (Living Well but Poorly: Suburban youths show high levels of distress and substance abuse.) Ovid Full text.

Education Week, November 20, 2002 (Report Roundup: Affluent Youths)

Mobile Register (AL), November 17, 2002 (Are kids from affluent families more likely to drink?)

APA Practice, No date (Resilience Resources)

Voices for Children, No Date (Promoting Children's Health Development)

Leadership to keep Children Alcohol Free, November 14, 2002 (Underage Drinking By Affluent Suburbanites)

CNN Radio, November 13, 2002 (Interview with Jim Ribble)

Associated Press, November 12, 2002 (NYC Suburbs Worry About Teen Drinking) - AP article

Psychology Today, June 2005 (Down and out in Orange Coutny)

reprinted/cited in over 30 other sources.

Lexis-Nexis, November 12, 2002 (Teen drinking incidents raise worries in affluent NYC Suburbs)

Lexis-Nexis, November 12, 2002 (Risky business: Parents, police fear teen drinking on the rise in affluent NYC Suburbs)

Lexis-Nexis, November 12, 2002 (NYC Suburbs Worry About Teen Drinking)

WPXI-TV Channel 11 (PA), November 12, 2002 (Suburban Parents Fear Teen Drinking)

Today's School Psychologist, November 11, 2002 (Rich youth more prone to stress, substance use, and depression)

Lexis-Nexis, November 10, 2002 (Teen drinking incidents raise worries in affluent NYC suburbs)

Lexis-Nexis, October 31, 2002 (Rich youth prone to stress, substance abuse, depression)

The Metrowest Daily News, October 22, 2002 (Wallace: Parents running for cover)

International Child and Youth Care Network, October 8, 2002 (Early pressures tied to drug abuse)

Boston Globe, October 7, 2002 (Early pressures tied to drug abuse)

Media Awareness Project (Boston Globe), October 7, 2002 (Early pressures tied to drug abuse)

Cannabis News (World Net Daily), October 4, 2002 (Doping our kids)

Muzi.com (News), September 23, 2002 (Affluent Kids Abusing Drugs)

Mindful-Things Weekly, September 20, 2002 (Psychology News)

UPI, September 18, 2002 (Affluent kids: Both pressured and ignored)UPI article reprinted/cited in over 10 other sources.

Intelihealth(Blue Bell, PA), September 18, 2002 (Affluent Youth Prone to High Distress, Substance Abuse)

MSN Health (WebMD), September 18, 2002 (Affluent kids abusing drugs: Overwhelmed by pressure, middle-school students get into trouble)

AOL Health (WebMD), September 18, 2002 (Affluent kids abusing drugs)

Health Behavior News Service, September 17, 2002 (Affluent Youth Prone to High Distress, Substance Abuse)

EurekAlert (Washington, DC), September 17, 2002 (Affluent Youth Prone to High Distress, Substance Abuse)

The Stress of Life.com, No date (Affluent Youth Prone to High Distress, Substance Abuse)

New Haven Advocate, 2002 (Nannies tell all: Accessory kids and their rich parents who neglect them)

National Mentoring Partnership, 2002 (Journal of Youth and Adolescence)

Center for Family & Demographic Research, Bowling Green State University (Working Papers, 02-03)

Alberta (CA) Mental Health Board, March 2002 (Promoting Resilience)

ISI Essential Science Indicators, February 1, 2002 (Fast Breaking Comments)

Australian Information & Support Services for Men, August 15, 2001 (More Kids Struggle with Depression)

The Minuteman, May 16, 2001 (depression and substance use among affluent youth)

Australian Institute of Family Studies, March 13, 2001 (Literature Highlights)

New Haven Advocate, February 7, 2001 (Nannies and neglect of children in wealthy families).

Westport News, January 19, 2001 (teen risky behaviors and parenting issues)

The Minuteman, January 25, 2001(pressures and competition among suburban youth)

National Council of Jewish Women Journal, Winter 2000/2001 (challenges of the middle school years)

Westport News, January 2, 2001 (teen stress and pressures)

National Council of Jewish Women, Winter 2001 (The Middle School Years: Some Troubling Insights, A Conversation with Dr. Suniya Luthar)

MaineToday.com, December 31, 2000 (Pressure to succeed can have costly effects on teens)

Westport News, October 20, 2000 (substance use among affluent teens)

Westport News, September 20, 2000 (after school program instituted to prevent risky behaviors)

Cablevision editorial, May 12, 2000 (problems and lack of after-school supervision, suburban youth)

Westport News, May 03, 2000 (problems of suburban teens)

Detroit News, August 30, 1999 (adjustment problems among upper-SES teens)

USA Today, August 16, 1999 (drugs and depression among suburban teens)

Parenting Magazine, August 1999 (raising healthy teens)

CNN News, April 24, 1999 (mental health concerns among suburban youth)

Australian Broadcasting Corporation, April 22, 1999 (preventing violence)

New York Times, April 22, 1999 (adolescent mental health; preventing violence)

USA Today, December 14 1998 (generation gap, mother-daughter relationships)

WSYR radio, Syracuse, NY, August 28, 1998 (adolescent depression)

Sun Herald, August 24, 1998 (depression among girls)

USA Today, August 13, 1998 (depression among suburban teens)

WCBS radio, New York, August 14, 1998 (adolescent depression)

Westport News, November 19, 1997 (professional workshop for community agencies)

Westport News, October 10, 1997 (parenting workshops to prevent teen substance use)

Ladies' Home Journal, May, 1994 ("Women who beat the odds")

American Health, April 1994 ("The miracle of resilience")

TEACHING/UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES

2006   Chair, Department of Counseling and Clinical Psychology, Teachers College

2007   Elected faculty representative, Search Committee for Teachers College Dean

2005-2006  Member, Faculty Executive Committee, Teachers College, Columbia University

2003-2005  Member, Committee for Promotion to Full Professor, Teachers College, Columbia University.

1999 - 2002  Coordinator of Developmental Psychology Program, Department of Human Development, Teachers College, Columbia University.

1998 2005   Member, Institutional Review Board, Teachers College, Columbia University.

1997 -     Graduate courses -- Teachers College, Columbia University. Developmental Psychopathology; Risk, resilience & poverty: Processes in children's adjustment; Adolescent development and developmental problems

1997 - 1999  Member, Faculty Executive Committee and Academic Programs Subcommittee, Teachers College, Columbia University

1995 - 1997   Graduate / postdoctoral research seminar, Yale University. Research Topics in Developmental Psychopathology.

1994 - 1997 Advisor, undergraduates senior projects, Department of Psychology, Yale University

1994 - 1997   Supervision of postdoctoral fellows for Connecticut state licensure, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University

1993 - 1995   Supervision of psychology interns in group psychotherapy, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University

1993 - 1997   Faculty member, graduate students' predissertation and dissertation advisory committees, Department of Psychology, Yale University

1991 - 1992   Supervision of graduate students in child assessment, Yale Child Study Center

1986 - 1988   Member, Graduate Student Advisory Committee, Department of Psychology, Yale University

current projects



CURRENT RESEARCH

      Conducted within a developmental psychopathology framework research by our group revolves around the construct of resilience and positive youth development (Luthar, 2003; Luthar, 2006; Luthar & Brown, 2007;  Luthar, Cicchetti, & Becker, 2000).  Core questions of interest are: What are the processes that help some children do well in spite of diverse stressors in their lives?  Across various spheres of development -psychological, emotional, interpersonal, and academic- how can children maximize their potentials and achieve competent, productive trajectories over time? 

           Currently, we are focused on three major programs of research.  The first involves middle- and high-school students from both wealthy and poor families, and the second involves children of mothers with major psychiatric illnesses.  In the third, we are attempting to understand what the experience of motherhood means, from a developmental perspective.

 Child & adolescent development in poverty vs. wealth: Research in schools"font-family: Arial; font-size: 16px; "> 

       This program of research has its roots in a 1999 study involving two samples of 10th graders - those from low-income, urban families and high-income, suburban families.  Findings showed that on several fronts the wealthy children fared more poorly than did their low-income counterparts.  Specifically, they reported much higher levels of cigarette, alcohol, and marijuana use as well as significantly greater anxiety; in addition, suburban girls reported startlingly high levels of depression (Luthar & D'Avanzo, 1999).

           In a subsequent study, we considered whether the problems seen among wealthy 10th graders might be seen among younger children as well, and also began to explore possible causes of such distress among these apparently "privileged" youth.  Our results showed that affluent sixth graders seemed to be relatively untroubled, but seventh graders did show some beginning signs of distress, again, chiefly in relation to overall substance use, anxiety, and depression among girls.  Exploration of possible reasons for distress showed that two factors seemed to be implicated; one was excessive pressures to achieve, and the other was isolation (physical and emotional) from parents (Luthar & Becker, 2002).

           These findings led to the initiation of a long-term follow-up study of a new cohort of about 350 suburban middle school students, whom we have assessed each year since 1999 when they were sixth graders.  This project is still ongoing; our hope is to continue to follow these youth through their transition to young adulthood.  Alongside the 6th, 7th, and 8th grade assessments of this suburban cohort, we also conducted parallel assessments of a low-income, urban cohort, so that we could begin to disentangle major processes in development across these two very different contexts.

           Our first comparison of these two groups of students, when they were 6th graders, was focused on aspects of family relations, and again, findings showed that the high-income students were, in fact, no more "privileged" than were their inner-city counterparts.  Across various relationship dimensions wealthy suburban youth perceived their parents no more positively than did students who lived in harsh conditions of urban poverty.  Furthermore, in the rich community just as in the poor one, children who felt close to their parents excelled across different domains; those who felt distant from their parents tended to be at risk for emotional as well as academic problems (Luthar & Latendresse, 2005b).

           Peer pressure is widely believed to have a strong effect on their development, and in our next study, we examined the degree to which wealthy and poor youth might serve as both positive and negative socializing influences (Becker & Luthar, 2004).  Again, we found more similarities than differences:  Early adolescents in both settings were somewhat admiring of classmates who openly flouted authority.

           As noted earlier, we have followed this suburban 6th grade cohort through high school and have found several issues of concern.  As high school sophomores, for example, these youth reported significantly higher levels of substance use as compared to national normative samples.   They also said that their parents were generally more tolerant of their substance use than of other adolescent "misbehaviors", such as rudeness to adults or minor acts of delinquency.  And (not surprisingly) greater perceived parent lenience of substance use was related to more frequent use of drugs and alcohol by the teens (Luthar & Goldstein, 2008).  Subsequent analyses revealed that substance use during high school was not without its consequences.  Sophomores reporting marijuana use, in particular, tended to achieve significantly poorer academic grades than others during their last three years of high school (Ansary & Luthar, 2009).

        In recent years, we have extended our work with teens in our longitudinal cohort to cover also (a) private schools serving high-income families in large cities, and (b) suburban youth in areas other than the North East.   Collectively, these data suggest that the problems of affluent youth seem to generalize beyond a particular community or geographic area.  Across multiple samples, we are seeing that affluent youth report, on average, more difficulties than national normative samples not only in substance use but also other problems including internalizing symptoms (such as depression and anxiety), self-injurious behaviors, and random acts of delinquency (Luthar & Barkin, 2012; Luthar & Goldstein, 2008; Yates, Tracy, & Luthar, 2008).    

           In addition to the topics listed above, doctoral students are currently exploring a range of questions based on the data we already have.  To illustrate, ongoing projects are focused on the long-term effects of different dimensions of family relationships; the role of eating disorders and body image problems in suburban girls' vulnerability to depression; the long-term effects of problems such as depression, anxiety, and substance use on adolescents' academic grades; the degree to which neighborhoods' characteristics (such as isolation and alienation versus support and helpfulness) might contribute to adolescent's adjustment; and attitudes toward help-seeking from community professionals (e.g., concerns about the privacy of family problems).

Children of mothers with major mental illnesses

            A second area of ongoing research is on resilience and vulnerability among children of mothers with major psychiatric disorders such as drug abuse, and depressive or anxiety disorders.  This programmatic research is ongoing in New Haven, CT, and began with research on families of cocaine and heroin addicts, which revealed that 8-17 year old children of substance abusing mothers were at high risk for many problems.  More specifically, almost two thirds of these children had at least one major psychiatric disorder themselves by the average age of 12 years (Luthar, Cushing, Merikangas, & Rounsaville, 1998).

            In subsequent work, we considered the degree to which vulnerability might be conferred by maternal drug abuse per se and / or by depressive and anxiety disorders, which often co-exist with addiction among women.  In a new study, we recruited three groups of mothers: those with histories of cocaine or heroin abuse; depression or anxiety; or neither of these sets of diagnoses.  An initial exploration of a subset of approximately 200 mothers and their children in this sample showed, in fact, that maternal depression was apparently more deleterious for children than was maternal drug abuse: children of drug abusing mothers had lower rates of psychiatric disorders than did offspring of depressed mothers (Luthar, D'Avanzo, & Hites, 2003).  With completion of data collection for this study - 361 mother-child dyads - we are now conducting further, in-depth analyses of relative child vulnerability as a function of maternal diagnoses.

            In an extension of this study, we obtained funding to conduct follow-up assessments of this cohort of mothers and children, four and a half years after their original assessments.  We reasoned that whereas drug abusers' children seemed less vulnerable than depressed mothers' children at the average age of 12 years, these differences could be reversed by middle and late adolescence - when the children could themselves begin to experiment with substances more freely.  This longitudinal follow-up study is currently underway.

            A recent extension of this work has been to recruit high socioeconomic status mothers with major mental illnesses as well.  Thus far, our work in this domain has been focused largely on low-income women and their children, but recently, we have begun to explore parallel issues among wealthy, highly-educated mothers as well.  There is an assumption that with the availability of economic resources for their parents' psychiatric treatment, children in these families would be relatively trouble-free, but there are no data available, so far, to validate or negate this assumption.

            In addition to continuing with the various psychiatric and psychological assessments described in our earlier works (Luthar et al., 2003; 1998), another exciting new extension of this work on mother-child dyads involves the inclusion of biological indices.  Specifically, we are now considering genetic factors in vulnerabilities to different disorders, as well as biological measures of stress-reactivity, as indexed, for example, by levels of the stress hormone cortisol, heart rate, and body temperature.   

            Another extension of this work involves psychotherapy research.  In the mid 1990's, we developed a parenting group psychotherapy for at-risk mothers, entitled Relational Psychotherapy Parenting Group.  This intervention was based on insight-oriented therapy, and its development reflected specific recognition of the challenges unique to women and mothers.  Initial evaluations showed that drug-abusing mothers who received this intervention fared significantly better, after treatment, than did those who received treatment as usual in their methadone clinics (Luthar & Suchman, 2000).  Following this initial assessment, we received funding for a larger randomized clinical trial, in which this treatment was tested against drug counseling.  Data from this new trial confirmed the importance of the supportive intervention for women in clinics.  (Luthar, Suchman, & Altomare, 2007).

            As with the school-based research, doctoral students at Teachers College are currently exploring various aspects of these data of mothers with major mental illnesses and their offspring.  Examples of topics considered are further analyses of child vulnerability as a function of different maternal diagnoses; long-term effects of maternal depression versus substance abuse; the role of intelligence as a potential "protective factor"; and major antecedents of academic or educational resilience. 

Motherhood: Developmental phenomenology

 In developmental research, women are typically considered in terms of their behaviors as mothers - rarely in terms of their own personhood.  In an internet-based survey (www.MomsAsPeople.com), we are exploring how women  feel about their different roles -- not only as mothers, but also as spouses, friends, workers (in and out of the home), individuals with various hopes and fears -- and how they cope with the challenge of balancing multiple roles.

References (for more citations, please see Bibliography under "CV") 

Ansary, N. A.. & Luthar, S. S. (2009).  Distress and academic achievement among adolescents of affluence: A study of externalizing and internalizing problem behaviors and school performance.  Development and Psychopathology, 21, 319-341.  

Becker, B., & Luthar S. S. (2007). Peer-perceived admiration and social preference: contextual correlates of positive peer regard among suburban and urban adolescents. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 17(1), 117-144.  

Luthar, S. S. (2003). The culture of affluence: Psychological costs of material wealth.Child Development, 74, 1581-1593.

Luthar, S.S. (Ed.) (2003).  Resilience and vulnerability: Adaptation in the context of childhood adversities. Cambridge University Press.

Luthar, S. S. (2006). Resilience in development: A synthesis of research across five decades. In D. Cicchetti & D. J. Cohen (Eds.), Developmental Psychopathology: Risk, disorder, and adaptation (pp. 740-795). New York: Wiley.  

Luthar, S. S., & Ansary, N.  (2005). Privileged but pressured: A study of affluent youthChild Development, 73, 1593-1610.

Luthar, S. S., & Barkin, S. H.  (2012).  Are affluent youth truly "at risk"? Vulnerability and resilience across three diverse samples.  Development and Psychopathology, 24, 429-449. 

   

Luthar, S. S. & Brown, P. J. (2007). Maximizing resilience through diverse levels of inquiry: Prevailing paradigms, possibilities and priorities for the future.  Development and Psychopathology, 19, 931-955.     
 
Luthar, S. S., Cicchetti, D., & Becker, B.  (2000). Multiple jeopardy: Risk and protective factors among addicted mothers' offspringDevelopment and Psychopathology, 10, 117-136.     

Luthar, S. S., & D'Avanzo, K. (1999). Children's exposure to community violence: Implications for understanding risk and resilience. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 33, 499-505.  

Luthar, S. S., & Latendresse, S. J. (2005). Children of the affluent: Challenges to well-being. Current Directions in Psychological Science,14 , 49-53  

Luthar, S. S., & Latendresse, S. J.  (2005b). Comparable "risks" at the SES extremes: Pre-adolescents' perceptions of parentingDevelopment and Psychopathology, 17, 207-230.

Luthar, S. S., & Sexton, C. (2005). The high price of affluence. In R. V. Kail (Ed.), Advances in Child Development, 32, 126-162. San Diego, CA: Academic Press. 

Luthar, S. S., & Suchman, N. E.  (2000). ). Relational Psychotherapy Mothers' Group: A developmentally informed intervention for at-risk mothers. Development and Psychopathology, 12, 235-253.   

Luthar, S. S., Suchman, N. E., & Altomare, M. (2007). Relational Psychotherapy Mothers Group: A randomized clinical trial for substance abusing mothers. Development and Psychopathology, 19, 243-261.  

Yates, T. M., Tracy, A. J., Luthar, S. S. (2008).  Nonsuicidal self-injury among "privileged" youth: Longitudinal and cross-sectional approaches to developmental processes. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 76, 52-62.

honors and awards

2010                Appointment as Professor Adjunct, Yale University's Child Study Center
2009         Award for Mentorship, Courage, and Integrity: Asian Caucus of the Society for Research in Child Development.

"font-family: 'Times New Roman'; ">2007-2008 Member, Committee on Socioeconomic Status: American Psychological  Association - Board for the Advancement of Psychology in the Public Interest

2006          Fellow, American Association for Psychological Science (APS) for Distinguished Contributions to Psychological Science
 
2006 - 2009Member, Governing Council, Society for Research in Child Development
 
2005 -- 2006Outstanding Teacher Award, Teachers College, Columbia University
 
2003 - 2004 Outstanding Teacher Award, Teachers College, Columbia University.
 
2002 - 2003Outstanding Teacher Award, Teachers College, Columbia University.
 
2002              Chair, Initial Review Group: National Institute of Health, Center for Scientific Review: Psychosocial Development, Risk and Prevention -1 Committee (Term: 2002 - 2004)
 
1998               Boyd McCandless Young Scientist Award for Early Career Contributions. American Psychological Association, Division 7: Developmental Psychology
 
1996              Outstanding Contributions to Child Development. Delhi University, India
 
1995             American Mensa Education & Research Foundation Award for excellence in research on intelligence and intellectual giftedness
 
1993             Research Scientist Development Award (K-21). National Institute on Drug Abuse
 
1990             American Psychological Association Dissertation Award, Div. 37:Child, Youth, & Family Services
 
1988                Enders Prize Fellowship: support for dissertation research, Yale University.
 
1987                Enders Prize Fellowship: supportfor independent research, Yale University.

1978                 All India Post Graduate Merit Scholarship

grants

Principal Investigator: Family Research Consortium - V. National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse, OBSSR; (R13 MH082592-01); Dates: May 01, 2008 - April 30, 2011.

Principal Investigator: "Maternal Drug Abuse, Psychopathology, and Child Adaptation".  National Institute on Drug Abuse (2 R01 DA010726-12); dates: 09/30/2007 - 05/31/2012; costs: $2,785,648.

Principal Investigator: "Substance Abuse Among Suburban Youth: A Prospective Study".  National Institute on Drug Abuse (DA014385-01); dates: 02/01/2003 - 01/31/2008; costs: $1,262,126.

Principal Investigator: "Maternal Drug Abuse, Psychopathology, and Child Adaptation".  National Institute on Drug Abuse (RO1DA10726-07); dates: 04/01/2002 - 03/01/2007; costs: $1,933, 415.

Principal Investigator: "Vulnerability and competence among suburban youth: A seven wave longitudinal study".  William T. Grant Foundation; dates: 06/01/2001 - 05/31/2007; costs: $502,845.  

Principal Investigator: "Relational Parenting Groups for DCF-involved mothers".  Department of Children and Families, State of Connecticut; dates: 01/03/2000 - 06/31/2000; costs: $11,000. 

Principal Investigator: "Risk and resilience among suburban adolescents: A three-year longitudinal study".  William T. Grant Foundation; dates: 04/01/1999 - 03/31/2001; costs: $53,705. 

Co-Principal Investigator: "Aggression in school-age children".  Co-Investigators: Marla Brassard, Terry Orr, Charles Basch, Teachers College, Columbia University.  Spencer Foundation; dates: 08/01/1999 - 07/31/2001; costs:  $300,000.

Co-investigator: "Drug-Dependent Fathers: A Developmental Perspective"  P.I.: Thomas McMahon, Yale University.  National Institute on Drug Abuse (RO1-DA11988); dates: 07/01/1998 - 06/30/2000; costs:  $136,787. 

Principal Investigator: "Relational Parenting Therapy for Opioid Abusing Mothers".  National Institute on Drug Abuse (RO1-DA11498); dates: 01/01/1998 - 11/30/2002; costs: $2,226,520. 

Principal Investigator: "Maternal drug use, psychopathology, and child adaptation".  National Institute on Drug Abuse (RO1-DA10726); dates: 09/30/1996 - 09/29/2001; costs: $1,513,080.

Principal Investigator: "Risk and resilience among adolescents".  William T. Grant Foundation; dates: 07/01/1996 - 06/30/1997; costs: $5,000.

Faculty Award: Salary support from the Smith Richardson Foundation, Westport, CT, to supplement NIDA Research Scientist Development Award; dates: 08/01/1996 - 07/31/1997; costs: $19,019.        

Principal Investigator: "Psychosocial profiles associated with adolescent substance use: A school-based, needs-assessment study".  Component grant within the "Psychotherapy Development for Cocaine and Opioid Abuse" Center funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse; Center PI: Bruce Rounsaville, M.D. (P50-DA09241); dates: 09/01/1995 - 08/01/1997; costs:  $11,800. 

Principal Investigator: "Relational Psychotherapy Parenting for addicted mothers". Component grant within the "Psychotherapy Development for Cocaine and Opioid Abuse" Center funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse; Center PI: Bruce Rounsaville, M.D. (P50-DA09241); dates: 09/01/1994 - 08/31/1997; costs: $401, 628. 

Co-Investigator: "Parenting stress in opioid dependent women and the developmental competence of their children: A study of treatment needs".  Component grant within the "Psychotherapy Development for Cocaine and Opioid Abuse" Center funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse; PI: Bruce Rounsaville, M.D. (P50-DA09241); dates: 09/01/1994 - 08/01/1996; costs: $11,862. 

Research Scientist Development Award (K21) from National Institute on Drug Abuse (K21-DA00202); dates: 08/01/1993 - 07/31/1998; costs:  $574,066.

Principal Investigator on grant from the Social Science Research Council, New York, for research on resilience among underprivileged adolescents.  Funded by the Rockefeller Foundation; dates: 09/1990 - 12/1991; costs: $6,850.

personal news

In September 2009, Luthar returned to teaching full time after a two-year gap due to events following her tenure as Chair, Department of Counseling and Clinical Psychology.  For details, see

HUDK 5040: Development and psycho-pathology: Atypical contexts and populations

Using contemporary research as the basis, the focus is on the interface between classical developmental psychology theories and patterns of development identi-fied in atypical contexts (e.g., poverty) and among atypical populations (e.g., resilient youth). Implications for interventions and policy are also discussed.

HUDK 6529: Seminar in risk, resilience and developmental psychology

Permission required. Students participate in ongoing research.

HBSK 6575: Research in Applied Educatrional Psychology: Risk and resilience

Permission required. Prerequisite: familiarity with statistical procedures and research design. Students participate in ongoing research or other special projects under the direction of a faculty member.

Documents & Papers

Download: 1999LuthDAvanz [PDF]

Download: 1998MultJeopardy [PDF]

Download: LuthCiccBeckResil [PDF]

Download: 2000LuthSuchRPMG [PDF]

Privileged but pressured

Download: 2002PrivilButPressured [PDF]

The culture of affluence

Download: 2003CultureofAffluence [PDF]

Summary of findings from Resilience book

Download: 2003LuthZelazoResilience [PDF]

Children's exposure to community violence

Download: 2004LuthGoldsteinCommViol [PDF]

Children of the affluent

Download: 2005CurrentDirections [PDF]

Dimensions of adolescent rebellion

Download: 2005LuthAnsaryAdolSES_Extremes [PDF]

The high price of affluenc

Download: 2005HighPriceAffluence [PDF]

Comparable “risks” at the SES extremes

Download: 2005LuthLatendParentsSES_Extremes [PDF]

Resilience at an early age and its impact on child psychosocial developmen

Download: 2005Luth_Resil_Encyclo [PDF]

Extracurricular involvement among affluent youth

Download: 2006ActivitiesLuthShoumBrown [PDF]

Conceptual issues in studies of resilience

Download: 2006LuthSawyBrown [PDF]

Substance use, emotional distress, delinquent behavior, and social competence

Download: 2006McMahLuthAdolSubstance [PDF]

“Overscheduling” versus other stressors

Download: 2006LutharSPR [Word]

Peer-perceived admiration and social preference

Download: 2007BeckerLuthar [PDF]

Maximizing resilience through diverse levels of inquiry

Download: 2007LutharBrown [PDF]

Relational Psychotherapy Mothers Group

Download: 2007LuthSuchRPMG [PDF]

Maternal drug abuse versus maternal depression

Download: 2007LuthSextonMatDrug [PDF]

Nonsuicidal self-injury among "privileged" youth

Download: 2008Yatesetal [PDF]

Distress and academic achievement among adolescents of affluence

Download: 2009AnsaryLuthar [PDF]

Substance use and related behaviors among suburban late adolescents

Download: 2009LuthGoldsteinContainment.pdf [PDF]

Download: 2009 Yoo [PDF]

Download: 2011 Racz [PDF]

Download: 2012LutharandBarkin [PDF]

Problems of rich kids

Download: 2013 Psychology Today [PDF]

Download: My TC Picture [Image]

Centers and Projects

Developmental Psychopathology and Resilience Among Children and Families at Risk
Dr. Suniya Luthar's current work is with affluent adolescent populations aimed at understanding the psychosocial risk and protective factors that interact to eventuate in maladjustment. She is currently conducting a longitudinal project that has followed students from 6th grade through high school in an affluent suburban community.

Please contact Suniya Luthar suniya.luthar@tc.columbia.edu if you have any further questions.

Suniya S. Luthar appeared in the following articles:

Wealthy, Suburban Children Experience Substance Abuse, Depression and Anxiety at a Higher Rate than Inner-City Kids (5/13/2013)

Suniya Luthar: Keep Teens Busy But Ease Performance Pressure (2/7/2013)

The Psychological Impact of Spirituality (11/21/2012)

Suniya Luthar Gives Forbes.com Readers Advice on Raising Wealthy Children (6/19/2012)

The Consequences of Great Expectations (5/14/2012)

What's a Mother to Do? (12/16/2011)

Idalia Catalan: Coming of Age (10/10/2011)

Bidding Farewell to a Capital Guy (5/12/2011)

Navigating Adolescent Risk-Taking (6/14/2010)

Good Parents, Bad Results (6/12/2008)

The State of the College: Emerging Stronger from Trying Times (10/20/2007)

Transcript of the State of the College Address (10/19/2007)

2006: Research Highlights (5/8/2007)

Mercer Island has it all, plus extra helping of teen angst (4/21/2007)

Cosmopolitan Moms (11/9/2006)

Orienting to History (10/27/2006)

Faculty Notes (9/18/2006)

Study: The more activities the better (9/18/2006 12:55:00 PM)

Study Finds Wealthier Teens More Troubled (9/14/2006 12:08:00 PM)

Kids Really Aren't Overscheduled (8/20/2006)

No Beach Blanket Bingo Here (6/8/2006)

Psychology Professor Offers Insights on Teenage Drug Use (5/19/2006)

Resilience and Vulnerability- Adaptation in the Context of Childhood Adversities (8/16/2005)

Schools plan survey on students' drinking (8/16/2005)

TC Professor May Lead Study of Teens' Risky Behaviors (8/5/2005)

More Money, More Problems? (2/8/2005)

Engaging in Research: An Award-Winning Faculty (8/1/2003)

In brief (4/1/2003)

Luthar's Study on Affluent Adolescents is National News (12/1/2002)

Suburban Kids Under More Pressure than Ever (10/17/2002)

Study Shows Affluent Kids May Be More Likely to Abuse Drugs (9/17/2002)

Study Shows Affluent Kids May Be More Likely to Abuse Drugs (9/17/2002)

From Pakistani Television for Children to the Afghan Children's Project (6/1/2002)

In Brief (3/1/2002)

Examining School Violence (1/1/2001)

Spencer Grant Studies Research: Nipping Aggression in the Bud (1/1/2001)

Graduates Sing 'Happy Birthday' to Governor Hunt of North Carolina (6/1/2000)

Professor Luthar Finds Suburban Teens Prone to Substance Abuse and Stress (6/1/2000)

Professor Luthar's Study Finds Suburban Teens more Prone to Substance abuse, Stress and delinquency (8/1/1999)

Luthar to Receive APA Award (2/12/1998)