People

Current Lab Members


Lab Director

George A. Bonanno, Ph.D. is a Professor of Clinical Psychology. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1991. His research and scholarly interests have centered on the question of how human beings cope with loss, trauma and other forms of extreme adversity, with an emphasis on resilience and the salutary role of flexible coping and emotion regulatory processes. Professor Bonanno’s recent empirical and theoretical work has focused on defining and documenting adult resilience in the face of loss or potential traumatic events, and on identifying the range of psychological and contextual variables that predict both psychopathological and resilient outcomes. In 2019, he received lifetime achievement awards from both the Association for Psychological Science (APS) and the International Positive Psychology Association (IPPA). He is most recent book is The Other Side of Sadness: What the New Science of Bereavement Tells us about Life After Loss (Basic Books). Email:  gab38@columbia.edu

Post-Doc

Ann-Christin Haag is a postdoctoral researcher. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Zurich, Switzerland, investigating acute stress reactions in children after trauma. She conducted a study on the evaluation of an early intervention to prevent posttraumatic stress symptoms in accidently injured children and their parents at the University Children‘s Hospital Zurich.

Her research interests center on the adjustment of children, adolescents and parents in the aftermath of potentially traumatic events. Thereby, she is interested in mapping trajectories of dysfunction and resilience as well as studying their predictors. Further, her interests include the study of how regulatory flexibility is tied to the onset, severity, and persistence of posttraumatic outcomes in children and adolescents.

email: ah3784@tc.columbia.edu

Doctoral Student

Derrick  Hull is a doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology Program. He received an Ed.M. in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University, and an M.A. in Psychology in Education from Teachers College, Columbia University. He investigates the unique psychological challenges of modernity using the biological and social determinants of emotion as a paradigm case. His research focuses on 1) regulatory flexibility, 2) the attentional components of emotion, and 3) assisted attentional disengagement through social and technological interventions to enhance coping and well-being.

He developed the short Social Referencing Action Guide for use in coding intentional, socially-directed facial behavior, and has recently studied the extent to which these behaviors predict emotion dysregulation. Email: tdh732@mail.harvard.edu 

Doctoral Student

Meaghan Mobbs is a doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology program.  She received a B.S. in Comparative Politics from the United States Military Academy and a M.A. in Forensic Psychology from George Washington University.  A former Army CPT, her research interests include all aspects of the transition and social adjustment of soldiers from military service to civilian life and gender optimization in combat. Email: mm4713@tc.columbia.edu

Doctoral Student

Sandy Huang is a fifth-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology program. She received a B.A. (Hons) in Psychology from the University of Melbourne, Australia, and a M.A. in Clinical Psychology from Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research interests include the psychophysiological correlates of regulatory flexibility and their effects on adjustment to stressful life events.

Email: shh2125@tc.columbia.edu

Doctoral Student

Shuquan Chen is a third-year graduate student in the Clinical Psychology PhD program. Before coming to Columbia, he obtained a B.Sc. in Psychology from Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. Shuquan is interested in cognitive, physiological, and social processes that support emotion regulation flexibility, as well as predictors of psychopathology and adjustment following stressful and traumatic life events.

Email: sc4173@tc.columbia.edu

Doctoral Student

Charlotte is a fourth-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology Program.  She received a B.A. in Psychology from Colorado College and a M.A. in Psychology in Education from Teachers College, Columbia, University.  Her research interests focus on facilitating psychosocial adjustment following potential traumatic events through the study of emotion regulation, regulatory flexibility, and identification of factors that predict resilient outcomes. 

Lab member pic
Doctoral Student

Isabel is a first-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology Program. She received her B.A. in Communications and Philosophy from Tulane University and M.A. in Psychology in Education from Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research interests include the role of regulatory flexibility (context sensitivity, repertoire, and feedback monitoring) in adaptive coping and emotion regulation, flexibility interventions, and ecological momentary assessment. 

Email: it2293@tc.columbia.edu

Doctoral Student

Laura is a fourth-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology Program. She received her B.A. in Psychology from Skidmore College and M.S. in General/Special Elementary Education from Hunter College. Her research interests include the behavioral, emotional, and physiological mechanisms linking trauma with physical health outcomes, specifically cardiovascular disease. 

Doctoral Student
Doctoral Student

Rohini is a second-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology Program. She received her B.A. in Neurobiology and Behavior Sciences from Cornell University and M.A. in Psychology in Education from Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research interests include exploring the physiological and cognitive mechanisms of affective regulation and emotion flexibility within trauma and disability management.

Doctoral Student
Doctoral Student

Roland Hart is a second-year doctoral student in the Clinical Psychology Program. He received his B.S. in Psychology and B.A. in Music from Drake University, and an M.A. in Psychology in Education from Teachers College, Columbia University. His research interests include coping flexibility, context sensitivity, autobiographical memory disturbance, and military/veteran mental health.

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