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When the Media Call - Print

When called by a newspaper or magazine reporter, don't panic.
PRINT: You're in the news

When called by a newspaper or magazine reporter, don't panic. If you need a few minutes to collect your thoughts, tell the reporter you will call back. Make sure to get the reporter's name and the name of the publication. Reporters work under demanding deadlines and may press you for an immediate answer, but make sure your thoughts are collected before giving any response.

Go over in your mind points you want to discuss and be prepared to provide the reporter with background information to help further his or her understanding of the issue.

Choose clear and simple words to explain your point, and if possible, avoid two-part answers. Emphasize your main points through repetition. To be sure the reporter understands the point you are trying to make, it is helpful to provide written material, such as a news release prepared by External Affairs or a journal article, as background information.

It is important to be patient and avoid arguments with the person interviewing you. If you want to make a contradiction, do it gently. Avoid being drawn into negative arguments and using words you don't want to use.

Some interviews may take an hour or more, and big announcements could result in calls from the media over a period of several days. It is easy to get impatient and irritable when you must repeat the same information several times, but it is important to remember that this time is being spent on behalf of the College. The only way to ensure accurate press coverage is to be available for comment and to act courteously.

You should not ask to see the final article, but you should tell the reporter that he or she is welcome to call back for additional help or clarification.

Published Saturday, Apr. 13, 2002

When the Media Call - Print

PRINT: You're in the news

When called by a newspaper or magazine reporter, don't panic. If you need a few minutes to collect your thoughts, tell the reporter you will call back. Make sure to get the reporter's name and the name of the publication. Reporters work under demanding deadlines and may press you for an immediate answer, but make sure your thoughts are collected before giving any response.

Go over in your mind points you want to discuss and be prepared to provide the reporter with background information to help further his or her understanding of the issue.

Choose clear and simple words to explain your point, and if possible, avoid two-part answers. Emphasize your main points through repetition. To be sure the reporter understands the point you are trying to make, it is helpful to provide written material, such as a news release prepared by External Affairs or a journal article, as background information.

It is important to be patient and avoid arguments with the person interviewing you. If you want to make a contradiction, do it gently. Avoid being drawn into negative arguments and using words you don't want to use.

Some interviews may take an hour or more, and big announcements could result in calls from the media over a period of several days. It is easy to get impatient and irritable when you must repeat the same information several times, but it is important to remember that this time is being spent on behalf of the College. The only way to ensure accurate press coverage is to be available for comment and to act courteously.

You should not ask to see the final article, but you should tell the reporter that he or she is welcome to call back for additional help or clarification.
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