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When the Media Call - TV

TELEVISION: On-camera interviewing strategies
TELEVISION: On-camera interviewing strategies

Behave as if the camera and sound system are turned on all of the time. Lean slightly forward in your chair with your feet on the floor or neatly crossed. This body language will communicate interest and enthusiasm on your part and will enhance the message you want to communicate.

Place your hands in your lap or on the arms of the chair when listening or being asked a question. Look your interviewer in the eye most of the time. Look at the interviewer, not the camera. Be aware, also, that the camera may be looking at you even when you think it is not.

Make eye contact changes from the interviewer to the camera as smoothly as possible. It's important to resist getting comfortable; however, don't be stiff.

The easiest way to eliminate nervousness is to learn to smile. If necessary, take a deep breath before answering a question. This gives you a chance to gather your thoughts. It's especially important to smile if the interviewer seems hostile.

What to wear on camera


Simplicity is the key to looking your best on camera. Dark colors are more authoritative. Don't wear wild colors or patterns.

Men should wear a solid light blue shirt and a dark-colored suit, preferably blue or gray. Striped or white shirts, chunky jewelry and wild-colored neck-ties should be avoided. Women should wear a solid light blue blouse or shirt and a dark-colored suit or blazer. Sparkling, large jewelry and ruffles are distracting and should be avoided.

If you wear glasses, don't wear the photosensitive type that turn dark in bright light.

Published Saturday, Apr. 13, 2002

When the Media Call - TV

TELEVISION: On-camera interviewing strategies

Behave as if the camera and sound system are turned on all of the time. Lean slightly forward in your chair with your feet on the floor or neatly crossed. This body language will communicate interest and enthusiasm on your part and will enhance the message you want to communicate.

Place your hands in your lap or on the arms of the chair when listening or being asked a question. Look your interviewer in the eye most of the time. Look at the interviewer, not the camera. Be aware, also, that the camera may be looking at you even when you think it is not.

Make eye contact changes from the interviewer to the camera as smoothly as possible. It's important to resist getting comfortable; however, don't be stiff.

The easiest way to eliminate nervousness is to learn to smile. If necessary, take a deep breath before answering a question. This gives you a chance to gather your thoughts. It's especially important to smile if the interviewer seems hostile.

What to wear on camera


Simplicity is the key to looking your best on camera. Dark colors are more authoritative. Don't wear wild colors or patterns.

Men should wear a solid light blue shirt and a dark-colored suit, preferably blue or gray. Striped or white shirts, chunky jewelry and wild-colored neck-ties should be avoided. Women should wear a solid light blue blouse or shirt and a dark-colored suit or blazer. Sparkling, large jewelry and ruffles are distracting and should be avoided.

If you wear glasses, don't wear the photosensitive type that turn dark in bright light.

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