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Educators Speak Out Over Boys Suspension

The suspension of a sixth-grader in a Mamaroneck school has experts cautioning the public to not label the school officials as extreme. The boy was suspended earlier this month after reciting a crude poem to two girls. Officials said that a suspension would not have occurred had there not been earlier attempts at intervention. Educators who fail to stop students from sexually harassing classmates can be held financially responsible, according to a Supreme Court ruling.

The suspension of a sixth-grader in a Mamaroneck school has experts cautioning the public to not label the school officials as extreme. The boy was suspended earlier this month after reciting a crude poem to two girls. Officials said that a suspension would not have occurred had there not been earlier attempts at intervention. Educators who fail to stop students from sexually harassing classmates can be held financially responsible, according to a Supreme Court ruling.

"Whether this is an overreaction or there's a history of harassment with this child, we don't know," said TC's Judith Berman Brandenberg, a professor of psychology and education. "At least it's evidence that they're taking sexual harassment seriously.

The article, entitled "Educators Speak Out Over Boys Suspension" appeared in the April 8th edition of the New York Journal News.

When possible, the News Bureau provides a link to article summaries, a link is always provided to the online source. Not all online sources archive information and some charge a fee for older material.

Published Tuesday, Sep. 18, 2001

Educators Speak Out Over Boys Suspension

The suspension of a sixth-grader in a Mamaroneck school has experts cautioning the public to not label the school officials as extreme. The boy was suspended earlier this month after reciting a crude poem to two girls. Officials said that a suspension would not have occurred had there not been earlier attempts at intervention. Educators who fail to stop students from sexually harassing classmates can be held financially responsible, according to a Supreme Court ruling.

"Whether this is an overreaction or there's a history of harassment with this child, we don't know," said TC's Judith Berman Brandenberg, a professor of psychology and education. "At least it's evidence that they're taking sexual harassment seriously.

The article, entitled "Educators Speak Out Over Boys Suspension" appeared in the April 8th edition of the New York Journal News.

When possible, the News Bureau provides a link to article summaries, a link is always provided to the online source. Not all online sources archive information and some charge a fee for older material.

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