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Tomorrow's Education, Made to Measure

"We are witnessing the start of a revolution that will transform American education forever," says President Levine, in an op-ed for The New York Times.
"We are witnessing the start of a revolution that will transform American education forever," says President Levine, in an op-ed for The New York Times. The revolution is from an industrial society to an information society. This revolution is what is causing the increase in students labeled "learning disabled." When we were industrial, we needed things (such as education) to be efficient and product oriented. Now, Levine says, we are in the information age, which is oriented more towards customization. Evidenced most obviously in the retail business, customization is what the new citizen expects. Although many education critics are citing the problems of special education, special education is a sign of progress. It is one of the symptoms of the trend toward tailoring education to each student. Levine says that "the old education system is dying," and that we should not resist this change. The best thing we can do is to make "the transition as short and as painless as possible." The op-ed, entitled "Tomorrow's Education, Made to Measure" appeared in the December 22 edition of the New York Times. When possible, the News Bureau provides a link to article summaries, a link is always provided to the online source. Not all online sources archive information and some charge a fee for older material.

Published Tuesday, Sep. 18, 2001

Tomorrow's Education, Made to Measure

"We are witnessing the start of a revolution that will transform American education forever," says President Levine, in an op-ed for The New York Times. The revolution is from an industrial society to an information society. This revolution is what is causing the increase in students labeled "learning disabled." When we were industrial, we needed things (such as education) to be efficient and product oriented. Now, Levine says, we are in the information age, which is oriented more towards customization. Evidenced most obviously in the retail business, customization is what the new citizen expects. Although many education critics are citing the problems of special education, special education is a sign of progress. It is one of the symptoms of the trend toward tailoring education to each student. Levine says that "the old education system is dying," and that we should not resist this change. The best thing we can do is to make "the transition as short and as painless as possible." The op-ed, entitled "Tomorrow's Education, Made to Measure" appeared in the December 22 edition of the New York Times. When possible, the News Bureau provides a link to article summaries, a link is always provided to the online source. Not all online sources archive information and some charge a fee for older material.
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