Are Computers Hurting Kids' Ability to Learn? | Teachers College Columbia University

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
News & Events Header

Teachers College Newsroom

Skip to content Skip to content

Are Computers Hurting Kids' Ability to Learn?

In a time when, according to a report from the US Department of Education, 94 percent of elementary school's have Internet access, some educators are saying that it is a serious mistake to embrace technology so enthusiastically. These experts are saying that young students are more harmed by computers than helped when it comes to developing thinking skills.

In a time when, according to a report from the US Department of Education, 94 percent of elementary school's have Internet access, some educators are saying that it is a serious mistake to embrace technology so enthusiastically. These experts are saying that young students are more harmed by computers than helped when it comes to developing thinking skills.

"It's developmentally harmful for young students," says TC Professor Douglas Sloan. Along with others, Sloan contends that computers may inhibit learning by stunting the development of language, social skills and critical thinking and offering passive "edutainment" in return.

The article, entitled "Vocal Critics Suggest Booting Computers From Early Grades" appeared in the February 26 edition of the Omaha World-Herald.

Published Tuesday, Sep. 18, 2001

Are Computers Hurting Kids' Ability to Learn?

In a time when, according to a report from the US Department of Education, 94 percent of elementary school's have Internet access, some educators are saying that it is a serious mistake to embrace technology so enthusiastically. These experts are saying that young students are more harmed by computers than helped when it comes to developing thinking skills.

"It's developmentally harmful for young students," says TC Professor Douglas Sloan. Along with others, Sloan contends that computers may inhibit learning by stunting the development of language, social skills and critical thinking and offering passive "edutainment" in return.

The article, entitled "Vocal Critics Suggest Booting Computers From Early Grades" appeared in the February 26 edition of the Omaha World-Herald.

How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends