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The Pitfalls of Annual Testing

"I am pleased that the new education bill provides more resources for poor children, but I am concerned that it mandates annual math and reading tests in grades three through eight," wrote Clifford Hill, the Arthur I. Gates Professor of Language, in a recent editorial in the Christian Science Monitor.

"I am pleased that the new education bill provides more resources for poor children, but I am concerned that it mandates annual math and reading tests in grades three through eight," wrote Clifford Hill, the Arthur I. Gates Professor of Language, in a recent editorial in the Christian Science Monitor.

"As states gear up to meet this demand, the problems encountered during the past decade in developing standards-based testing are likely to be exacerbated," continued Hill. "In taking on this increased burden, states may be forced to forgo the most promising approaches to testing." Testing for reading, and assesing more complex thinking is not possible with multiple choice and machine graded type tests, they require students writing and teachers evaluating.

"What we are likely to see nationwide is already clear in the 15 states with annual math and reading tests in grades three through eight. All except Tennessee use multiple-choice tests such as the Standford 9, even though these commercially produced tests are not in line with these states' standards." said Hill.

The article, entitled "The Pitfalls of Annual Testing" appeared in the December 27, 2001 edition of the Christian Science Monitor.

When possible, the News Bureau provides a link to article summaries, a link is always provided to the online source. Not all online sources archive information and some charge a fee for older material.

Published Wednesday, Jun. 26, 2002

The Pitfalls of Annual Testing

"I am pleased that the new education bill provides more resources for poor children, but I am concerned that it mandates annual math and reading tests in grades three through eight," wrote Clifford Hill, the Arthur I. Gates Professor of Language, in a recent editorial in the Christian Science Monitor.

"As states gear up to meet this demand, the problems encountered during the past decade in developing standards-based testing are likely to be exacerbated," continued Hill. "In taking on this increased burden, states may be forced to forgo the most promising approaches to testing." Testing for reading, and assesing more complex thinking is not possible with multiple choice and machine graded type tests, they require students writing and teachers evaluating.

"What we are likely to see nationwide is already clear in the 15 states with annual math and reading tests in grades three through eight. All except Tennessee use multiple-choice tests such as the Standford 9, even though these commercially produced tests are not in line with these states' standards." said Hill.

The article, entitled "The Pitfalls of Annual Testing" appeared in the December 27, 2001 edition of the Christian Science Monitor.

When possible, the News Bureau provides a link to article summaries, a link is always provided to the online source. Not all online sources archive information and some charge a fee for older material.

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