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Hunt for University of Hawaii President Keeps Campus in the Dark

The search for a new president for the University of Hawaii has students and faculty upset because of its closed door nature.

The search for a new president for the University of Hawaii has students and faculty upset because of its closed door nature. Committee members meet in private, conceal the candidates names and keep the process as far from the public eye as possible. But, experts say that this process is not unusual and is used for recruiting nearly all high profile university officials.

"There is a general format," said TC President Levine. Newspaper ads are taken out to publicize the position and comply with affirmative action requirements but often aid little in recruiting an official, added Levine. "You sort of get people who think, 'Hey. I work at the post office. Maybe I can be a university president.' You get videotapes in the mail. You get pictures. You get recordings. You get the weirdest stuff." Most of it goes straight to the trash, said Levine.

The article, entitled "Hunt for University of Hawaii President Keeps Campus in the Dark" appeared in the December 24th edition of the Honolulu Advertiser.

When possible, the News Bureau provides a link to article summaries, a link is always provided to the online source. Not all online sources archive information and some charge a fee for older material.

Published Tuesday, Sep. 18, 2001

Hunt for University of Hawaii President Keeps Campus in the Dark

The search for a new president for the University of Hawaii has students and faculty upset because of its closed door nature. Committee members meet in private, conceal the candidates names and keep the process as far from the public eye as possible. But, experts say that this process is not unusual and is used for recruiting nearly all high profile university officials.

"There is a general format," said TC President Levine. Newspaper ads are taken out to publicize the position and comply with affirmative action requirements but often aid little in recruiting an official, added Levine. "You sort of get people who think, 'Hey. I work at the post office. Maybe I can be a university president.' You get videotapes in the mail. You get pictures. You get recordings. You get the weirdest stuff." Most of it goes straight to the trash, said Levine.

The article, entitled "Hunt for University of Hawaii President Keeps Campus in the Dark" appeared in the December 24th edition of the Honolulu Advertiser.

When possible, the News Bureau provides a link to article summaries, a link is always provided to the online source. Not all online sources archive information and some charge a fee for older material.

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