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Pennsylvania's $30 million education tax credit program

While the issues of school choice, vouchers, and tax credits remain hotly debated topics among educators, an increasing number of businesses are championing the notion of funneling money directly to scholarship funds rather than the tax collector.

Pennsylvania's $30 million education tax credit program

While the issues of school choice, vouchers, and tax credits remain hotly debated topics among educators, an increasing number of businesses are championing the notion of funneling money directly to scholarship funds rather than the tax collector. In the wake of the recent passing of Pennsylvania's $30 million education tax credit program, Clive Belfied, Assistant Director of International and Transcultural - Grant at Teachers College, comments that this may be indicative of a more general national trend. While Belfield said there is no question that credits drain money from the public treasury, he's not sure that is enough to halt the spread of such programs.

"It's possible they could explode. That business like this is probably a suggestion that it will spin out to other states." said Belfield.

The article, entitled "Pennsylvania plan may be best in the nation" appeared in the March 24, 2002 edition of the Tribune-Review.

Published Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2002

Pennsylvania's $30 million education tax credit program

Pennsylvania's $30 million education tax credit program

While the issues of school choice, vouchers, and tax credits remain hotly debated topics among educators, an increasing number of businesses are championing the notion of funneling money directly to scholarship funds rather than the tax collector. In the wake of the recent passing of Pennsylvania's $30 million education tax credit program, Clive Belfied, Assistant Director of International and Transcultural - Grant at Teachers College, comments that this may be indicative of a more general national trend. While Belfield said there is no question that credits drain money from the public treasury, he's not sure that is enough to halt the spread of such programs.

"It's possible they could explode. That business like this is probably a suggestion that it will spin out to other states." said Belfield.

The article, entitled "Pennsylvania plan may be best in the nation" appeared in the March 24, 2002 edition of the Tribune-Review.

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