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Elementary School Violence on the Rise

Safe school advocates see a rise nationwide in elementary school children committing violent acts.

Elementary School Violence on the Rise

Safe school advocates see a rise nationwide in elementary school children committing violent acts. Pennsylvania and New Jersey, for example, report stark increases in violent incidents at elementary and middle schools from 1999 through 2001. As a result, new Philadelphia schools CEO Paul Vallus introduced a tough discipline policy and threatened principals with losing their jobs if they tried to hide problems with violence. This year so far 361 violent incidences have been reported, up from 141 last year. Many blame the rise in violence among children on violence in the home. Children imitate violent behavior they see in their parents, other adults, and other kids. Many families are battling poverty as well as family violence.

More and more schools are being held accountable for dealing with violent children. Much of the concern arises because violent children often grow up to be violent, criminal adults. "Aggression that is not remedied nearly always leads to later acts of delinquency," writes Wendy Schwartz of Teachers College.

 

The article, entitled "Editorial Truth and Violence" appeared in the November 24th edition of the Philadelphia Inquirer .

Published Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2002

Elementary School Violence on the Rise

Elementary School Violence on the Rise

Safe school advocates see a rise nationwide in elementary school children committing violent acts. Pennsylvania and New Jersey, for example, report stark increases in violent incidents at elementary and middle schools from 1999 through 2001. As a result, new Philadelphia schools CEO Paul Vallus introduced a tough discipline policy and threatened principals with losing their jobs if they tried to hide problems with violence. This year so far 361 violent incidences have been reported, up from 141 last year. Many blame the rise in violence among children on violence in the home. Children imitate violent behavior they see in their parents, other adults, and other kids. Many families are battling poverty as well as family violence.

More and more schools are being held accountable for dealing with violent children. Much of the concern arises because violent children often grow up to be violent, criminal adults. "Aggression that is not remedied nearly always leads to later acts of delinquency," writes Wendy Schwartz of Teachers College.

 

The article, entitled "Editorial Truth and Violence" appeared in the November 24th edition of the Philadelphia Inquirer .

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