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Even Kindergartners Feeling the Pressure of Testing

Kindergarten is no longer about playtime and naps. Test-driven education reform nationwide is leading to higher expectations for young children. In many states all children are expected to learn to read by the end of kindergarten, which many teachers say sets up students for failure and may affect their entire school career.

Even Kindergartners Feeling the Pressure of Testing

Kindergarten is no longer about playtime and naps. Test-driven education reform nationwide is leading to higher expectations for young children. In many states all children are expected to learn to read by the end of kindergarten, which many teachers say sets up students for failure and may affect their entire school career. Some experts say this pressure is unnecessary because no research shows a connection between early reading and higher academic achievement in later years. Many administrators, however, feel that children can rise to the challenge of rigorous standards in kindergarten. Some parents also feel their children benefit from more academic kindergarten programs.

"There's quite a struggle going on nationally now in kindergarten programs over the kinds of standards that are being required," said Leslie Williams, professor of early childhood education. "I think there's a kind of concern in the public that somehow children aren't doing real work unless there's a very traditional kind of work going on in the classroom with worksheets."


The article, entitled "As Playtime is Curbed in the Name of Testing, Even Kindergartners are Feeling the Heat" appeared in the October 28th edition of the Chicago Tribune .

Published Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2002

Even Kindergartners Feeling the Pressure of Testing

Even Kindergartners Feeling the Pressure of Testing

Kindergarten is no longer about playtime and naps. Test-driven education reform nationwide is leading to higher expectations for young children. In many states all children are expected to learn to read by the end of kindergarten, which many teachers say sets up students for failure and may affect their entire school career. Some experts say this pressure is unnecessary because no research shows a connection between early reading and higher academic achievement in later years. Many administrators, however, feel that children can rise to the challenge of rigorous standards in kindergarten. Some parents also feel their children benefit from more academic kindergarten programs.

"There's quite a struggle going on nationally now in kindergarten programs over the kinds of standards that are being required," said Leslie Williams, professor of early childhood education. "I think there's a kind of concern in the public that somehow children aren't doing real work unless there's a very traditional kind of work going on in the classroom with worksheets."


The article, entitled "As Playtime is Curbed in the Name of Testing, Even Kindergartners are Feeling the Heat" appeared in the October 28th edition of the Chicago Tribune .

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