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TC Fund-Raiser Makes a Marathoner out of his Dad

Last year Tim Freeman, 34, who does fund-raising for Teachers College; talked his father, Jim, into running the New York Marathon. In May 2001 Tim called his father, then 62, and asked, "How would you like to run in the New York Marathon?"

TC Fund-Raiser Makes a Marathoner out of his Dad

Last year Tim Freeman, 34, who does fund-raising for Teachers College; talked his father, Jim, into running the New York Marathon. In May 2001 Tim called his father, then 62, and asked, "How would you like to run in the New York Marathon?" Jim Freeman, a professor at Swarthmore, was a high school athlete but hadn't run in years. The elder Freeman wanted to lose some weight, had a sabbatical coming up, and decided training for a marathon would be the ideal physical challenge for his leave. Jim Freeman started slowly with short runs and gradually built up his endurance. Last year father and son ran the marathon side by side, finishing 22,623rd and 22,629th, good enough to make the list of finishers in the New York Times. Jim has continued to run, and he and Tim will be at the starting line again for this year's marathon. This year they'll be joined by another Freeman, Jim's wife and Tim's mom, Dorothy.

Tim jokes, "I feel like I created a monster."

The article, entitled "At 62, Professor Became Marathon Man" appeared in the October 28th edition of the Philadelphia Inquirer.

Published Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2002

TC Fund-Raiser Makes a Marathoner out of his Dad

TC Fund-Raiser Makes a Marathoner out of his Dad

Last year Tim Freeman, 34, who does fund-raising for Teachers College; talked his father, Jim, into running the New York Marathon. In May 2001 Tim called his father, then 62, and asked, "How would you like to run in the New York Marathon?" Jim Freeman, a professor at Swarthmore, was a high school athlete but hadn't run in years. The elder Freeman wanted to lose some weight, had a sabbatical coming up, and decided training for a marathon would be the ideal physical challenge for his leave. Jim Freeman started slowly with short runs and gradually built up his endurance. Last year father and son ran the marathon side by side, finishing 22,623rd and 22,629th, good enough to make the list of finishers in the New York Times. Jim has continued to run, and he and Tim will be at the starting line again for this year's marathon. This year they'll be joined by another Freeman, Jim's wife and Tim's mom, Dorothy.

Tim jokes, "I feel like I created a monster."

The article, entitled "At 62, Professor Became Marathon Man" appeared in the October 28th edition of the Philadelphia Inquirer.

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