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Engaging Students with Comic Books

Comic strip readers love their favorite funnies, but Michael Bitz of TC’s Center for Arts Education Research thinks it is no laughing matter that they can be the perfect learning tool to engage students.

Comic strip readers love their favorite funnies, but Michael Bitz of TC's Center for Arts Education Research thinks it is no laughing matter that they can be the perfect learning tool to engage students. As founder of TC's Comic Book Project, the senior research assistant is helping kids develop their storytelling skills by creating comic books based on educational themes. "Kids are back into comic books like nobody's business," he said. "And we are giving them an opportunity to create their own and express themselves through art. I really think it can make a difference in some of the lives of kids who need it most."

Dark Horse Comics, whose line includes "Shrek" and "Star Wars," has published some students' work. The timing of Bitz's initiative could not be better with the increasing popularity of comic book characters like Spider Man on the big screen. Bitz started the Comic Book Project in Queens, but schoolteachers in other cities like Cleveland, Ohio are now implementing it in their curricula.

The article, entitled "Innovative Teachers," appeared in the June 15 edition of the Washington Post.

Published Tuesday, Aug. 3, 2004

Engaging Students with Comic Books

Comic strip readers love their favorite funnies, but Michael Bitz of TC's Center for Arts Education Research thinks it is no laughing matter that they can be the perfect learning tool to engage students. As founder of TC's Comic Book Project, the senior research assistant is helping kids develop their storytelling skills by creating comic books based on educational themes. "Kids are back into comic books like nobody's business," he said. "And we are giving them an opportunity to create their own and express themselves through art. I really think it can make a difference in some of the lives of kids who need it most."

Dark Horse Comics, whose line includes "Shrek" and "Star Wars," has published some students' work. The timing of Bitz's initiative could not be better with the increasing popularity of comic book characters like Spider Man on the big screen. Bitz started the Comic Book Project in Queens, but schoolteachers in other cities like Cleveland, Ohio are now implementing it in their curricula.

The article, entitled "Innovative Teachers," appeared in the June 15 edition of the Washington Post.

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