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College Returns to Afghanistan to Finish the Job

Twenty-five years after it first began implementing educational reform in Afghanistan, Teachers College has returned to complete the job that it started. "This is not going to be an easy transition," said Barry Rosen who is heading the TC project in Kabul.
Twenty-five years after it first began implementing educational reform in Afghanistan, Teachers College has returned to complete the job that it started.  "This is not going to be an easy transition," said Barry Rosen who is heading the TC project in Kabul. "We need time to develop both a new curriculum and a teacher corps."  He went on to add, "It will take years."

Despite efforts to develop textbooks and provide professional development for teachers who frequently possess only a primary education themselves, such initiatives often pale to the dangers of war.  TC representatives were forced to postpone field-testing new textbooks until after the country's October 9 elections because of such violence.  "The situation here is not easy, but there are many, many children wanting to go to school," Rosen said. "Schools are targeted in many places . . . but I think education is on top of the agenda."

The article, entitled "With Election as Backdrop, Afghan Children Go Back to School," appeared in the October 13 edition of Education Week

Published Sunday, Oct. 17, 2004

College Returns to Afghanistan to Finish the Job

Twenty-five years after it first began implementing educational reform in Afghanistan, Teachers College has returned to complete the job that it started.  "This is not going to be an easy transition," said Barry Rosen who is heading the TC project in Kabul. "We need time to develop both a new curriculum and a teacher corps."  He went on to add, "It will take years."

Despite efforts to develop textbooks and provide professional development for teachers who frequently possess only a primary education themselves, such initiatives often pale to the dangers of war.  TC representatives were forced to postpone field-testing new textbooks until after the country's October 9 elections because of such violence.  "The situation here is not easy, but there are many, many children wanting to go to school," Rosen said. "Schools are targeted in many places . . . but I think education is on top of the agenda."

The article, entitled "With Election as Backdrop, Afghan Children Go Back to School," appeared in the October 13 edition of Education Week
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