N.A.E.P. Shows States How They Measure Up | Teachers College Columbia University

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
News & Events Header

Teachers College Newsroom

Skip to content Skip to content

N.A.E.P. Shows States How They Measure Up

Thanks to the National Assessment of Educational Progress, states can see just how well their students measure up against their peers across the U.S. "When you compare yourselves using N.A.E.P., you're able to compare yourselves to a much more expansive and comprehensive national base," said Douglas Wood, executive director of the National Academy for Excellent Teaching at TC.
Thanks to the National Assessment of Educational Progress, states can see just how well their students measure up against their peers across the U.S.  "When you compare yourselves using N.A.E.P., you're able to compare yourselves to a much more expansive and comprehensive national base," said Douglas Wood, executive director of the National Academy for Excellent Teaching at TC. "It seems to me that offers us additional information by which to make policy decisions."

N.A.E.P., a national test known as the country's report card, was once voluntarily used by states, but is now required under the No Child Left Behind policy.  Students' scores on N.A.E.P. point to the variance in states' definition of proficiency, and that becomes critical because of the sanctions imposed upon those failing to reach national goals in math and reading by 2014.

The article, entitled "Meaning of ‘Proficient' Varies for Schools Across Country," appeared in the January 19 edition of The New York Times.

Published Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2005

N.A.E.P. Shows States How They Measure Up

Thanks to the National Assessment of Educational Progress, states can see just how well their students measure up against their peers across the U.S.  "When you compare yourselves using N.A.E.P., you're able to compare yourselves to a much more expansive and comprehensive national base," said Douglas Wood, executive director of the National Academy for Excellent Teaching at TC. "It seems to me that offers us additional information by which to make policy decisions."

N.A.E.P., a national test known as the country's report card, was once voluntarily used by states, but is now required under the No Child Left Behind policy.  Students' scores on N.A.E.P. point to the variance in states' definition of proficiency, and that becomes critical because of the sanctions imposed upon those failing to reach national goals in math and reading by 2014.

The article, entitled "Meaning of ‘Proficient' Varies for Schools Across Country," appeared in the January 19 edition of The New York Times.
How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends