Artist Envisions A Place Where Other Artists Could Flourish | Teachers College Columbia University

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
News & Events Header

Teachers College Newsroom

Skip to content Skip to content

Artist Envisions A Place Where Other Artists Could Flourish

Two years ago, Martinez Celaya escaped the bustle of Los Angeles for Delray Beach, a beautiful, safe, and quiet beach town. A successful artist, Celaya now wants to open 20 small and affordable studios inside a two-story building he hopes to construct next to his own studio, which he could rent to working artists who could display their work in a gallery he would open in the same building.
Two years ago, Martinez Celaya escaped the bustle of Los Angeles for Delray Beach, a beautiful, safe, and quiet beach town. A successful artist, Celaya now wants to open 20 small and affordable studios inside a two-story building he hopes to construct next to his own studio, which he could rent to working artists who could display their work in a gallery he would open in the same building.

His idea comes during a time when city officials are looking to turn the city into a mecca for the arts, which could happen through providing affordable work space and affordable housing.

According to the Research Center for Arts and Culture at Teachers College at Columbia University, of 4,000 artists surveyed in 1997, only 28 percent owned their own work space, while 40 percent shared work space with others.

This article, written by Dianna Smith, appeared in the April 23rd, 2006 publication of The Palm Beach Post.

Published Monday, Apr. 24, 2006

Artist Envisions A Place Where Other Artists Could Flourish

Two years ago, Martinez Celaya escaped the bustle of Los Angeles for Delray Beach, a beautiful, safe, and quiet beach town. A successful artist, Celaya now wants to open 20 small and affordable studios inside a two-story building he hopes to construct next to his own studio, which he could rent to working artists who could display their work in a gallery he would open in the same building.

His idea comes during a time when city officials are looking to turn the city into a mecca for the arts, which could happen through providing affordable work space and affordable housing.

According to the Research Center for Arts and Culture at Teachers College at Columbia University, of 4,000 artists surveyed in 1997, only 28 percent owned their own work space, while 40 percent shared work space with others.

This article, written by Dianna Smith, appeared in the April 23rd, 2006 publication of The Palm Beach Post.

How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends