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NCLB: Students Getting Double Dose of the Three R's

Across the country, middle and high school students like are being required to spend more class time on English and math as schools try to raise test scores and meet the requirements of the federal No Child Left Behind act.

Across the country, middle and high school students are being required to spend more class time on English and math as officials try to raise test scores and meet the requirements of the federal No Child Left Behind law.

Some students attend two class periods each day of English and math, and often one of those English classes is devoted to reading instruction -- something that traditionally ends when students leave elementary school.

Some schools offer longer classes, or classes that meet every day instead of every other day, or classes that are offered for a full year instead of a single semester.

The approach appears to pay off at test time, but some educators worry that youngsters forced to give up some of their electives are being deprived of a well-rounded education and the opportunity to explore new subjects.

http://www.cnn.com/2006/EDUCATION/08/04/double.doseeducation.ap/index.html

Published Monday, Aug. 28, 2006

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NCLB: Students Getting Double Dose of the Three R's

Across the country, middle and high school students are being required to spend more class time on English and math as officials try to raise test scores and meet the requirements of the federal No Child Left Behind law.

Some students attend two class periods each day of English and math, and often one of those English classes is devoted to reading instruction -- something that traditionally ends when students leave elementary school.

Some schools offer longer classes, or classes that meet every day instead of every other day, or classes that are offered for a full year instead of a single semester.

The approach appears to pay off at test time, but some educators worry that youngsters forced to give up some of their electives are being deprived of a well-rounded education and the opportunity to explore new subjects.

http://www.cnn.com/2006/EDUCATION/08/04/double.doseeducation.ap/index.html

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