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School Tax Credit Would Be Limited

Gov. George Pataki's proposal for a tax credit has garnered the support of parents who are struggling to pay rising tuition for children in private school as well as rising property taxes for their community's public schools. It also has brought out the opposition of teachers unions and others who say the $400 million proposal would take away funds needed by local districts.
Gov. George Pataki's proposal for a tax credit has garnered the support of parents who are struggling to pay rising tuition for children in private school as well as rising property taxes for their community's public schools. It also has brought out the opposition of teachers unions and others who say the $400 million proposal would take away funds needed by local districts.

Part of the reason for the limited success is that the proposals are coming from Republicans, who, in large part, are still choosing to live in the suburbs and send their children to public schools, said Chad d'Entremont, assistant director of the National Center for the Study of Privatization in Education at Columbia University Teachers College. "It seems like tuition tax credits are going to become a more attractive solution to school choice in the future-'because they're less likely to be viewed as taking money from the public coffers and more likely to be viewed as money that already belongs to families."

This article, written by David Novich, appeared in the January 29th, 2006 publication of The Journal News.

Published Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2006

School Tax Credit Would Be Limited

Gov. George Pataki's proposal for a tax credit has garnered the support of parents who are struggling to pay rising tuition for children in private school as well as rising property taxes for their community's public schools. It also has brought out the opposition of teachers unions and others who say the $400 million proposal would take away funds needed by local districts.

Part of the reason for the limited success is that the proposals are coming from Republicans, who, in large part, are still choosing to live in the suburbs and send their children to public schools, said Chad d'Entremont, assistant director of the National Center for the Study of Privatization in Education at Columbia University Teachers College. "It seems like tuition tax credits are going to become a more attractive solution to school choice in the future-'because they're less likely to be viewed as taking money from the public coffers and more likely to be viewed as money that already belongs to families."

This article, written by David Novich, appeared in the January 29th, 2006 publication of The Journal News.

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