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Tisch Lecturer Outlines Report Card on Education

Richard Rothstein agrees with No Child Left Behind supporters on at least one point: Holding schools accountable for improving children's reading and math skills may, in fact, eventually lead to improvement in those skills. The problem, as Rothstein outlined it on Monday evening, January 30th during the first of a three-part Teachers College lecture series known as the Tisch Lectures, is that those skills could improve -- to the detriment of others that are equally important.
Richard Rothstein agrees with No Child Left Behind supporters on at least one point: Holding schools accountable for improving children's reading and math skills may, in fact, eventually lead to improvement in those skills. The problem, as Rothstein outlined it on Monday evening, January 30th during the first of a three-part Teachers College lecture series known as the Tisch Lectures, is that those skills could improve -- to the detriment of others that are equally important.

"What gets measured, gets done," said Rothstein, Tisch Visiting Professor at TC and research associate at the Economic Policy Institute, in a talk he titled Equity in What? Defining the Goals of American Education for which We Seek Equity. "The current accountability system makes American education more inequitable in other areas, because the places that are weakest in basic skills are most likely to reduce effort in other subjects to increase drill in math and reading."

This article was published on February 9th, 2006 in HomeNews.

Published Saturday, Feb. 11, 2006

Tisch Lecturer Outlines Report Card on Education

Richard Rothstein agrees with No Child Left Behind supporters on at least one point: Holding schools accountable for improving children's reading and math skills may, in fact, eventually lead to improvement in those skills. The problem, as Rothstein outlined it on Monday evening, January 30th during the first of a three-part Teachers College lecture series known as the Tisch Lectures, is that those skills could improve -- to the detriment of others that are equally important.

"What gets measured, gets done," said Rothstein, Tisch Visiting Professor at TC and research associate at the Economic Policy Institute, in a talk he titled Equity in What? Defining the Goals of American Education for which We Seek Equity. "The current accountability system makes American education more inequitable in other areas, because the places that are weakest in basic skills are most likely to reduce effort in other subjects to increase drill in math and reading."

This article was published on February 9th, 2006 in HomeNews.
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