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Addressing Classism Will Improve School Performance

Richard Rothstein, a research associate of the Economic Policy Institute and a visiting professor at Teachers College at Columbia University, offers the best thoughts I've heard on narrowing the black/white achievement gap.
Richard Rothstein, a research associate of the Economic Policy Institute and a visiting professor at Teachers College at Columbia University, offers the best thoughts I've heard on narrowing the black/white achievement gap.

The education system is less to blame for the achievement gap than society's ills. Yet, the No Child Left Behind law would have people think the schools are totally at fault.  America's sicknesses include racism and classism, and the underfunded No Child Left Behind law doesn't address that.

"You can't fix it with school reform," Rothstein told me. "The biggest improvements will come when you address social and economic inequality."

This article, written by Lewis Diuguid, appeared in the January 17th, 2006 publication of The Kansas City Star.

Published Thursday, Jan. 19, 2006

Addressing Classism Will Improve School Performance

Richard Rothstein, a research associate of the Economic Policy Institute and a visiting professor at Teachers College at Columbia University, offers the best thoughts I've heard on narrowing the black/white achievement gap.

The education system is less to blame for the achievement gap than society's ills. Yet, the No Child Left Behind law would have people think the schools are totally at fault.  America's sicknesses include racism and classism, and the underfunded No Child Left Behind law doesn't address that.

"You can't fix it with school reform," Rothstein told me. "The biggest improvements will come when you address social and economic inequality."

This article, written by Lewis Diuguid, appeared in the January 17th, 2006 publication of The Kansas City Star.

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