Rebell Keynote Speaker at 2006 Superintendents Conference | Teachers College Columbia University

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
News & Events Header

Teachers College Newsroom

Skip to content Skip to content

Rebell Keynote Speaker at 2006 Superintendents Conference

Michael A. Rebell, Executive Director of The Campaign for Educational Equity, was the keynote at the 2006 Superintendents Work Conference at Teachers College, Columbia University and addressed the audience on the topics of what the educational adequacy movement, or the nationwide effort to reform state education finance systems, can contribute to school improvement as well as future directions for NCLB.

     From July 9th -- July 12th, the 2006 Superintendents Work Conference was held at Teachers College, Columbia University.  The Theme for this year's conference was "Beyond No Child Left Behind: What is the Plan for Tomorrow?"  This conference drew superintendents from across the country and discussed topics such as:

What will students need to know and be able to do in our rapidly changing world?        

What kind of schools and other learning experiences will they need?                                 

How can we achieve equity and excellence for all our children?

     Michael A. Rebell, Executive Director of The Campaign for Educational Equity, Teachers College, Columbia University, was the keynote speaker and addressed the audience on the topics of what the educational adequacy movement, or the nationwide effort to reform state education finance systems, can contribute to school improvement as well as future directions for NCLB. 

     In regard to school improvement, Rebell said that in addition to adequate funding and essential educational resources, the adequacy movement offers a considerable amount of empirical insights.  From the educational adequacy trials held across the nation, there is a wealth of evidence to be tapped on issues such as accountability, teacher quality, capacity building and especially costing-out.

On the topic of future directions for NCLB, Rebell told the audience that he predicts that a strong federal presence in local education with an emphasis on outputs and results is likely to stay -- there is bipartisan support in Washington for this model. Given a greater role for the federal government in education and an emphasis on accountability, Rebell told the group of superintendents that we need to look at fundamental issues such as:

Is NCLB truly confronting the core issues in narrowing the achievement gap?

How do we maintain high standards in all states?

Is  the 100% proficiency by 2014 mandate plausible?

If not, how do we maintain the focus and motivation provided that mandate without the unreasonable AYP targets and other growing problems associated with it? 

    

     Rebell invited all members of the audience to attend the upcoming Campaign for Educational Equity Symposium, "Examining America's Commitment to Closing Achievement Gaps NCLB and Its Alternatives" on November 13 and 14, 2006 at Teachers College.  The Campaign's second annual symposium will examine in greater depth many of the issues that Rebell discussed in his keynote address.

Published Friday, Jul. 28, 2006

Rebell Keynote Speaker at 2006 Superintendents Conference

     From July 9th -- July 12th, the 2006 Superintendents Work Conference was held at Teachers College, Columbia University.  The Theme for this year's conference was "Beyond No Child Left Behind: What is the Plan for Tomorrow?"  This conference drew superintendents from across the country and discussed topics such as:

What will students need to know and be able to do in our rapidly changing world?        

What kind of schools and other learning experiences will they need?                                 

How can we achieve equity and excellence for all our children?

     Michael A. Rebell, Executive Director of The Campaign for Educational Equity, Teachers College, Columbia University, was the keynote speaker and addressed the audience on the topics of what the educational adequacy movement, or the nationwide effort to reform state education finance systems, can contribute to school improvement as well as future directions for NCLB. 

     In regard to school improvement, Rebell said that in addition to adequate funding and essential educational resources, the adequacy movement offers a considerable amount of empirical insights.  From the educational adequacy trials held across the nation, there is a wealth of evidence to be tapped on issues such as accountability, teacher quality, capacity building and especially costing-out.

On the topic of future directions for NCLB, Rebell told the audience that he predicts that a strong federal presence in local education with an emphasis on outputs and results is likely to stay -- there is bipartisan support in Washington for this model. Given a greater role for the federal government in education and an emphasis on accountability, Rebell told the group of superintendents that we need to look at fundamental issues such as:

Is NCLB truly confronting the core issues in narrowing the achievement gap?

How do we maintain high standards in all states?

Is  the 100% proficiency by 2014 mandate plausible?

If not, how do we maintain the focus and motivation provided that mandate without the unreasonable AYP targets and other growing problems associated with it? 

    

     Rebell invited all members of the audience to attend the upcoming Campaign for Educational Equity Symposium, "Examining America's Commitment to Closing Achievement Gaps NCLB and Its Alternatives" on November 13 and 14, 2006 at Teachers College.  The Campaign's second annual symposium will examine in greater depth many of the issues that Rebell discussed in his keynote address.

How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends