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No Child Law Affecting All Teachers

They talk about bubble sheets, scan trons and trend lines. They debate whether those tools -- all part of the standardized testing process -- can actually gauge how much a student has learned. Lessons like these are becoming more common in teaching schools across the country as the federal No Child Left Behind law forces colleges to prepare teachers to help students do well on standardized tests.
They talk about bubble sheets, scan trons and trend lines. They debate whether those tools -- all part of the standardized testing process -- can actually gauge how much a student has learned. Lessons like these are becoming more common in teaching schools across the country as the federal No Child Left Behind law forces colleges to prepare teachers to help students do well on standardized tests.

Professors are finding it's no longer enough to equip future educators with traditional teaching strategies. Now, they must also prepare them for an education system where schools are judged -- and funded in part -- on how well their students perform on these tests.

"There's no education school in the United States that isn't talking about this new accountability and testing," said Arthur Levine, president of Teachers College at Columbia University. "The reality is that students are going to be tested."

This article, written by Tiffany Lankes, appeared in the June 19th, 2006 publication of The Florida Herald Tribune.

Published Monday, Jun. 19, 2006

No Child Law Affecting All Teachers

They talk about bubble sheets, scan trons and trend lines. They debate whether those tools -- all part of the standardized testing process -- can actually gauge how much a student has learned. Lessons like these are becoming more common in teaching schools across the country as the federal No Child Left Behind law forces colleges to prepare teachers to help students do well on standardized tests.

Professors are finding it's no longer enough to equip future educators with traditional teaching strategies. Now, they must also prepare them for an education system where schools are judged -- and funded in part -- on how well their students perform on these tests.

"There's no education school in the United States that isn't talking about this new accountability and testing," said Arthur Levine, president of Teachers College at Columbia University. "The reality is that students are going to be tested."

This article, written by Tiffany Lankes, appeared in the June 19th, 2006 publication of The Florida Herald Tribune.
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