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We Can All Help Keep Young Workers Safe On The Job

The number of young workers who suffer on-the-job injuries has risen 30 per cent over the past five years, according to WorkSafeBC. And in the United States, statistics for 2004 from the Indiana Department of Labor suggest young workers aged 15-24 are twice as likely as adults to be injured on the job.

The number of young workers who suffer on-the-job injuries has risen 30 per cent over the past five years, according to WorkSafeBC. And in the United States, statistics for 2004 from the Indiana Department of Labor suggest young workers aged 15-24 are twice as likely as adults to be injured on the job.

The reasons were pinpointed recently by James Westabu and J. Krister Lowe, researchers at Teachers College at Columbia University. In their study of 2,542 young workers between the ages of 12 and 21, working in diverse fields such as farming, construction, child care and retail in the U.S., the authors observe that psychological factors may contribute to more young workers getting injured on the job.


This article, written by
Jennifer Newman and Darryl Grigg, appeared in the June 10th, 2006 publication of The Vancouver Sun.

Published Tuesday, Jun. 13, 2006

We Can All Help Keep Young Workers Safe On The Job

The number of young workers who suffer on-the-job injuries has risen 30 per cent over the past five years, according to WorkSafeBC. And in the United States, statistics for 2004 from the Indiana Department of Labor suggest young workers aged 15-24 are twice as likely as adults to be injured on the job.

The reasons were pinpointed recently by James Westabu and J. Krister Lowe, researchers at Teachers College at Columbia University. In their study of 2,542 young workers between the ages of 12 and 21, working in diverse fields such as farming, construction, child care and retail in the U.S., the authors observe that psychological factors may contribute to more young workers getting injured on the job.


This article, written by
Jennifer Newman and Darryl Grigg, appeared in the June 10th, 2006 publication of The Vancouver Sun.
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