Attention Surplus? Re-examining A Disorder | Teachers College Columbia University

Skip to content Skip to main navigation
News & Events Header

Teachers College Newsroom

Skip to content Skip to content

Attention Surplus? Re-examining A Disorder

Every generation likes to believe that it is witnessing the most dramatic epoch in history. In the case of the current Western world, that belief may indeed be accurate, particularly in light of the striking changes of the last 30 years.
Every generation likes to believe that it is witnessing the most dramatic epoch in history. In the case of the current Western world, that belief may indeed be accurate, particularly in light of the striking changes of the last 30 years.

For those of us who have "attention-surplus disorder," this knowledge-based economy has been a godsend. We thrive. Essentially, A.D.H.D. is a problem dealing with the menial work of daily life, the tedium involved in many school situations and 9-to-5 jobs.

But a more fundamental societal accommodation would be highly beneficial -- to recognize that each child and adult learns and performs better in certain contexts than others. As Arthur Levine, president of the Teachers College at Columbia University, has noted, future teachers will be able to individualize and customize the education of students.

This article, written by Paul Steinberg M.D., appeared in the March 7th, 2006 publication of The New York Times.

Published Tuesday, Mar. 7, 2006

Attention Surplus? Re-examining A Disorder

Every generation likes to believe that it is witnessing the most dramatic epoch in history. In the case of the current Western world, that belief may indeed be accurate, particularly in light of the striking changes of the last 30 years.

For those of us who have "attention-surplus disorder," this knowledge-based economy has been a godsend. We thrive. Essentially, A.D.H.D. is a problem dealing with the menial work of daily life, the tedium involved in many school situations and 9-to-5 jobs.

But a more fundamental societal accommodation would be highly beneficial -- to recognize that each child and adult learns and performs better in certain contexts than others. As Arthur Levine, president of the Teachers College at Columbia University, has noted, future teachers will be able to individualize and customize the education of students.

This article, written by Paul Steinberg M.D., appeared in the March 7th, 2006 publication of The New York Times.

How This Gift Connects The Dots
 
Scholarships & Fellowships
 
Faculty & Programs
 
Campus & Technology
 
Financial Flexibility
 
Engage TC Alumni & Friends