Cheating Is Reaching Epidemic Proportions Worldwide | Teachers College Columbia University

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Cheating Is Reaching Epidemic Proportions Worldwide

A disturbing and fast-growing problem now plagues education around the world: academic fraud. Cheating, plagiarism, the falsification of credentials, and other forms of misrepresentation by students, faculty members, and administrators at all levels of education have reached epidemic proportions. The pressures of the marketplace as well as constant new and improved technology are to blame.
A disturbing and fast-growing problem now plagues education around the world: academic fraud. Cheating, plagiarism, the falsification of credentials, and other forms of misrepresentation by students, faculty members, and administrators at all levels of education have reached epidemic proportions. The pressures of the marketplace as well as constant new and improved technology are to blame.

That's the view of Harold J. Noah of Teachers College at Columbia University. "Cheating is now ubiquitous in the United States and overseas," said Mr. Noah. "The competitive pressure on every actor in education, from the school systems to the universities, fuels this growing misconduct."

This article, written by Paul Desruisseaux, appeared in the March 26th, 2006 publication of The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Published Monday, Mar. 27, 2006

Cheating Is Reaching Epidemic Proportions Worldwide

A disturbing and fast-growing problem now plagues education around the world: academic fraud. Cheating, plagiarism, the falsification of credentials, and other forms of misrepresentation by students, faculty members, and administrators at all levels of education have reached epidemic proportions. The pressures of the marketplace as well as constant new and improved technology are to blame.

That's the view of Harold J. Noah of Teachers College at Columbia University. "Cheating is now ubiquitous in the United States and overseas," said Mr. Noah. "The competitive pressure on every actor in education, from the school systems to the universities, fuels this growing misconduct."

This article, written by Paul Desruisseaux, appeared in the March 26th, 2006 publication of The Chronicle of Higher Education.

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