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Comic Books for Learning

The three-year-old "Comic Book Project" developed by Dr. Michael Bitz of Columbia University's Teachers College is giving teachers ways to teach kids that will be stimulating and fun while skill-building at the same time. It gives kids the chance to use material from their own lives to conceive, write, and illustrate stories.
The three-year-old "Comic Book Project" developed by Dr. Michael Bitz of Columbia University's Teachers College is giving teachers ways to teach kids that will be stimulating and fun while skill-building at the same time. It gives kids the chance to use material from their own lives to conceive, write, and illustrate stories.

The comic books offer a dynamic way to teach elements of fiction required in many middle schools, and kids in 12 cities -- including Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Los Angeles, Philadelphia and Washington -- are learning about sequence and dialogue as they develop their panels. The kids address topics such as teamwork, violence, bullying, the environment and racial harmony -- casting themselves as heroes with supernatural powers. Meanwhile, they're learning to stick with a project, express themselves, and make their voices heard.

This article, written by Dr. Marciene Mattleman, appeared on KYW NewsRadio on March 14th, 2006.


Published Wednesday, Mar. 15, 2006

Comic Books for Learning

The three-year-old "Comic Book Project" developed by Dr. Michael Bitz of Columbia University's Teachers College is giving teachers ways to teach kids that will be stimulating and fun while skill-building at the same time. It gives kids the chance to use material from their own lives to conceive, write, and illustrate stories.

The comic books offer a dynamic way to teach elements of fiction required in many middle schools, and kids in 12 cities -- including Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Los Angeles, Philadelphia and Washington -- are learning about sequence and dialogue as they develop their panels. The kids address topics such as teamwork, violence, bullying, the environment and racial harmony -- casting themselves as heroes with supernatural powers. Meanwhile, they're learning to stick with a project, express themselves, and make their voices heard.

This article, written by Dr. Marciene Mattleman, appeared on KYW NewsRadio on March 14th, 2006.


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